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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

TOWN 
OF 

CHELMSFORD 



Annual Report 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31 



1994 



IN MEMORIAM 


1993 OMISSIONS 


1994 


MARTIN AMES 


ARTHUR BENNETT 


School Committee 


Volunteer Fireman 




Park Commission 


DONALD E. BLAIKIE, SR. 




Emergency Management Agency 


ELIZABETH K. FERREIRA 

Principal Clerk, 
Town Clerk Office 


JAMES F. DUNIGAN, SR. 




Fonner Highway Superintendent 
Park Commission 


DANIEL HART 




School Committee 




Board of Selectmen 


BRUCE KNOWLES 




Commission on Disabilities 






CHARLES J. MARDEROSIAN 




Town Celebration Committee 


WARREN C. LAHUE 




Finance Committee 






PATRICK J. MURTAGH 




Head Custodian, 


KENTON P. WELLS 


Public Building Division 


Sinking Fund 





ncu 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Incorporated 

Type of Government 

Location 

County 

Land Area 

Population 1994 

Assessed Valuation Rate for 1994 . . 

Tax Rate 

United States Senators in Congress: 
5th Congressional District 

State Senator 

Representative in General Court 
16th Middlesex District 

Accounting Department 

Assessors Office 

Board of Health 

Building Department 

Highway Department 

Office 

Garage 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library 

Children's House 

McKay Library 

School Superintendent 

Selectmen's Office 

Town Clerk 

Tax Collector & Treasurer 

Veterans' Agent 



N)SV 

Coil 



May, 1655 

Town Meeting 

Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and 

Tyngsboro on the North, Billerica on the East, Carlisle 

on the South, and Westford on the West. It is 24 miles 

from Boston, 40 miles from Worcester, and 225 miles 

from New York City. 

Middlesex 

22.54 Square Miles 

32,071 

$2,077,391,727 (Real Estate) 

$47,705,680 (Personal Property) 

Flat Rate $17.11 

($16.87 Residential-$17.97 Commercial) 

Martin Meehan, Lowell, MA 
Lucile C. Hicks, Wayland, MA 

CarolC. Cleven, Chelmsford, MA 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.* 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m.— 4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 7:00 a.m. -3:30 p.m. 

Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 9:00 a.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Thursday 1:00 p.m. -9:00 p.m. 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Monday, Tuesday & Wednesday 9:00 a.m.— 8:00 p.m. 
Thursday— Closed 

Friday & Saturday 9:00 a.m. -5:30 p.m. 

Monday & Wednesday 1:00 p.m. -8:00 p.m. 

Tuesday 1:00 p.m. -6:00 p.m. 

Thursday, Friday & Saturday. . . .9:00 a.m. — 1:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:00 a.m. -4:30 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday 8:30 a.m. -6:30 p.m.* 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Monday 8:30 a.m. -6:30 p.m.* 

Tuesday thru Friday 8:30 a.m.— 5:00 p.m. 

Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

*[Except June, July & August] 

MEETINGS 



Annual Town Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



First Tuesday in April 
Last Monday in April 
Third Monday in October 
7:00 p.m. -Every other Monday 
7:30 p.m.— Every other Tuesday 
7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Wednesday 
7:30 p.m. -2nd & 4th Thursday 
8:00 p.m.-lst & 3rd Tuesday 
7:00 p.m.— 1st Tuesday of Month 
7:30 p.m.-lst Tuesday of Month 



9 Precincts 

McCarthy Middle Sch. 
McCarthy Middle Sch. 
Town Offices 
Parker School 

Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 
Town Offices 

10 Wilson Street 



TOWN DIRECTORY 

Accounting 250-5215 

Assessors 250-5220 

Board of Appeals 250-5247 

Building Inspector 250-5225 

(Yard Sales & Bldg. Permits) 

Cemetery ' 250-5245 

Community Teamwork 459-0551 

Conservation Commission 250-5247 

Council on Aging 251-0533 

Dog Officer 256-0754 

Fire Department 256-2541 

All Other Fire Business 250-5265 

Gas Inspector 250-5225 

Health Department 250-5241 

Highway Department 250-5270 

Garage 250-5271 

High School 251-8729 

Housing Authority 256-7425 

Libraries: Adams 256-5521 

McKay 251-3212 

Mass. Electric Co 683-9511 

Planning Board Clerk 250-5231 

Plumbing Inspector 250-5225 

Police Department 256-2521 

Post Office (Center) 256-2361 

Recreation Commission 250-5262 

Registry of Deeds (Lowell) 458-8474 

Registry of Motor Vehicles 459-9397 

School Administration 251-4981 

Selectmen 250-5201 

Sewer Commission 250-5233 

Supt. of Public Bldgs 250-5249 

Town Clerk 250-5205 

Town Engineer 250-5228 

Town Manager 250-5201 

Treasurer/Tax Collector 250-5210 

Veterans' Agent 251-0123 

Water Dept 256-2381 

Welfare, Lowell '. 454-8061 

Wiring Inspector 250-5225 

24-hr. Juror Hotline 1-800-792-5117 



POLL LOCATIONS FOR ELECTIONS 



Precinct 1 
Precinct 2 
Precinct 3 
Precinct 4 
Precinct 5 
Precinct 6 
Precinct 7 
Precinct 8 
Precinct 9 



Town Offices Gym 
Harrington School Gym 
Harrington School Gym 
Westlands School 
Byman School Cafetorium 
Westlands School 
McCarthy Middle School 
McCarthy Middle School 
Town Office Gym 



U.S. Senator Edward M. Kennedy 

JFK Federal Bldg. Boston, MA 02202 
431 Russell Office Building 
Washington, DC 20510 
1-202-224-4543 

U.S. Senator John F. Kerry 

10 Park Plaza 
Boston, MA 02116 
362 Russell Office Building 
Washington, DC 20510 

Congressman Martin T. Meehan 

1429 Longworth House Bldg. 
Washington, DC 20515 
508-459-0101 (Lowell) Office 

State Representative Carol Cleven 

Room 36 State House 

Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-2552 

Home: 4 Arbutus Avenue 

Chelmsford, MA 

508-256-5043 

State Senator Lucile C. Hicks 

Room 41 3G - State House 
Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-1572 

Middlesex County Commission 

Superior Courthouse 

East Cambridge, MA 02141 

617-494-4100 



TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 
ELECTED OFFICIALS 

CEMETERY COMMISSION - 3 Yr Term 
1997 Jean R. McCaffrey 

1996 James F. Dolan 

1995 Gerald L. Hardy, CHMN 

CONSTABLE - 3 Yr Term 

1995 William E. Spence 

BOARD OF HEALTH - 3 Yr Term 

1997 Paul E. McCarthy, CHMM 

1996 Peter Dulchinos, CLERK 

1995 Paul J. Canniff, VCHMN 

HOUSING AUTHORITY - 5 Yr Term 

1998 Robert L. Hughes 
1998 Pamela Turnbull 

(Governor Appointed) 

1997 Lynn M. Marcella 

1996 William P. Keohane 

1995 Ruth Delaney 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES - 3 Yr Term 

1997 Jaclyn Dolan Matzkin, SEC 
1997 Nancy Knight, VCHRM 

1996 Elizabeth A. McCarthy, TREAS 
1996 D. Lorraine Lambert 

1996 Lynda Reid Warren, CHRM 
1995 Sarah L. Warner 

1995 John W. Cutter, Jr.*repl 

Susan Koeckhoven ^resigned 8/94 

MODERATOR - 3 Yr Term 

1996 Dennis E. McHugh 



PLANNING BOARD - 3 Yr Term 
1997 Kim J. MacKenzie 
1997 James P. Good, CHMN 
1996 Eugene E. Gilet, CLK 

1996 Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 

1995 James M. Creegan, VCHMN 
1995 John F. McCarthy 

1995 Tracey W. Cody* repl. 

Christine Gleason *resigned 11/94 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE - 3 Yr Term 

1997 Anthony V. Volpe 

1996 Judith B. Mallette 

1996 Mary E. Frantz 

1995 Carl A. Olsson, CHRM 

1995 Wendy Marcks 

SELECTMEN - 3 Yr Term 

1997 William F. Dalton, CLK 
1997 Roger A. Blomgrem, CHRM 

1996 Robert P. Joyce, VCHRM 
1995 Jeffrey A. Brem 

1995 Peter V. Lawlor 

SEWER COMMISSION - 3 Yr Term 

1997 George F. Abely, CLK 

1996 Thomas E. Moran 
1996 Richard J. Day 

1995 John P. Emerson, Jr., CHMN 
1995 Barry B. Balan, VCHMN 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

TOWN MANAGER 

Bernard F. Lynch 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Jean D. Sullivan 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Diane M. Phillips 

Bruce Symms 

Joseph B. Shanahan, Sr. 

BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Anthony F. Zagzoug 

TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St. Hilaire 

DPW DIRECTOR 

James E. Pearson 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Dwight M. Hayward, CHMN 

Beverly A. Koltookian 

Harold I. Matzkin 

John E. Morrison 

Michael McCall 

Charles A. Piper 

Barbara Skaar 

FINANCE DIRECTOR 

Charles F. Mansfield 

FIRE CHIEF 

John E. Parow 

POLICE CHIEF 

Armand J. Caron 

TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR 

Charles F. Mansfield 




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12 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 




(Front Row 1-r) Robert P. Joyce, Vice Chairman; 
Roger A. Blomgren, Chairman; William F. Dalton, Clerk 

(Back Row 1-r) Jeffrey A. Brem; Peter V. Lawlor 



13 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



During 1994, the Board changed as a result of the 
annual Town elections. Selectman William R. Logan 
chose not to seek re-election to dedicate his full efforts in 
the private sector. Bill will be remembered for his 
tireless efforts in working with the business community to 
attract new business to our Town while working to 
maintain a positive environment for those already here. 
The Board also lost Chairman Richard E. DeFreitas due 
to the election. Dick dedicated countless hours in 
working to ensure that matters before the Board were 
sufficiently researched through the use of a 
sub-committee approach to problem solving. Both men 
have earned the respect and gratitude from the Town for 
their valued contributions. The Board welcomed former 
Selectman Roger A. Blomgren and William F. Dalton as 
its newest members. Roger returns to the Board after a 
one year absence and Bill joins as the Town's second 
employee to serve in this capacity. 

The Board reorganized following the election and 
selected Roger A. Blomgren as Chairman, Robert P. 
Joyce, Vice Chairman, William F. Dalton, Clerk, Peter 
V. Lawlor and Jeffrey A. Brem held the fourth and fifth 
seats respectively. 

In settings its goals for the year, the board worked 
collaboratively with the Town Manager, Bernard Lynch 
to establish a set of limited priorities that would allow 
sufficient focus and a greater probability of achieving 
completion. To that end, the Board and Town Manager 
agreed to the commitment, development and issuance of 
the following: 

1 . Five Year Plan 

2. FY96 Budget 

3. Capital Planning Program 

4. Economic Development Program 

5. Library Financing Strategy 

6. In-House Ambulance Feasibility Study 



14 



7. Town/School Resource Sharing Plan 

8. Citizen Relations Program 

9. Expanded Community Service Programs 

10. Central Square Traffic Plan 

Specific details for the above goals may be 
obtained through the Town Manager's Office. 

The Town was also pleased with the results of its 
annual audit. Our auditors, Brown & Barrett, concluded 
that financial management practices employed by the 
Town were satisfactory and that issues raised in prior 
years were or in the process of being remedied. The 
strength of our financial management practices, a strong 
cash position and a sound budget process has enabled the 
Town to retain its favorable A-l bond rating. This comes 
at a time when many cities and towns within the 
Commonwealth are showing declines. Improvements in 
overall management practices were a direct result of the 
efforts of Town Accountant, Jean Sullivan, Treasurer/ 
Tax Collector, Charles Mansfield and their respective 
staffs. 

The Board was also pleased for having the 
opportunity to help select and hire Police Chief Armand 
Caron and Fire Chief Jack Parow. With the addition of 
these excellent Public Service officials, our Town now 
has a complement of managers serving the community 
that is among the best in the State. 

We also want to express our appreciation to State 
Representative Carol Cleven, State Senator Cecile Hicks 
and Congressman Marty Meehan for their continued 
support to us on the monitoring of legislative matters at 
the State and National level that may have an impact on 
our citizens. 

The Board has an excellent, publicly oriented 
support staff that makes the business of being a Selectman 
that much easier. Our thanks go to Judy Carter, Marian 
Currier, Diane Darling, and Jeanne Parziale. 



15 



Lastly, we are fortunate to have hundreds of 
employees and townspeople who help make our Town 
what it is. Without the efforts of those who are 
employees or serve on appointed, volunteer or ad hoc 
committees, the Town could not function the way it does. 
It is in their caring about making Chelmsford better that 
we achieve the excellence in service we receive. Please 
take the time to review the following report in detail. 
This is the one document that best summarizes the many 
contributions made by those who serve our Town. 

Respectfully Submitted, 



Roger A. Blomgrem, Chairman 
Robert P. Joyce, Vice Chairman 
William F. Dalton, Clerk 
Peter V. Lawlor 
Jeffrey A. Brem 



16 



TOWN MANAGER 



The calendar year which ended on December 13, 
1994 can be best described as a continuation of the 
progress which has been made over the past several years 
in bringing fiscal stability and service excellence for the 
Town of Chelmsford. This sense of continued progress is 
marked by several important accomplishments which 
should be seen as the results of ongoing efforts and not as 
aberrations. 

Perhaps the greatest accomplishments were in the 
realm of fiscal affairs. In facing up to the difficult years 
of 1989-1992 the Town has made steady progress in 
living within its means and squeezing every dollar of 
revenue to its maximum value. In 1994, these actions 
along with aggressive collections resulted in a record 
level of "Free Cash" of approximately $1.6 million. 
These funds were used in a carefully planned manner to 
balance the FY95 budget, increase educational funding, 
provide $190,000 in property tax relief, and to build up 
Town reserves by appropriating approximately 50% of 
the Free Cash to our Stabilization Fund. This last action 
brought the fund to its highest level in twelve years. The 
effect of building our reserves will be decreased 
borrowing costs and increased fiscal and service stability 
as the funds are utilized on an as-needed basis during 
uncertain times or as a revolving fund. 

Public safety again occupied a great deal of 
attention during the year with Armand Caron appointed as 
Police Chief and Jack Parow appointed as Fire Chief. 
Both of these individuals have brought new energy and 
enthusiasm to their respective departments. The Police 
Department has been extremely aggressive in obtaining 
state and federal funds with the high point being the 
award of six additional officers through the 1994 Federal 
Crime Bill. The Department is also developing new 
approaches to police work utilizing accepted theories of 
community policing. The Fire Department has proposed 
in-house ambulance service as an expansion of its 



17 



emergency medical services. This proposal is being 
studied and reviewed by a citizen committee with a 
recommendation expected in early 1995. The 

Department, as part of the broader effort to improve its 
medical services, has trained nearly one-third of its 
firefighters as Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs). 

In the area of public works the sewer project 
continued forward with areas in the Westlands being 
sewered. This project will become increasingly important 
with anticipated revisions in the State's rules and 
regulations governing septic systems. The DPW 
continued its efforts in road resurfacing and drainage 
improvements throughout the Town. These infrastructure 
improvements are essential to the community's economic 
condition. A major public works project also began this 
year after several years of planning and engineering with 
sidewalks constructed along Davis, Crooked Spring and 
Richardson Roads. This phased project will provide a 
community resource that all can use, but particularly 
students for walking to school. Lastly, the DPW did an 
outstanding job in dealing with snow related problems in 
early 1994 in one of the worst winters ever recorded. 

1994 also included activities to maximize our 
Community Services functions with increased program 
offerings and improved coordination. The highlight of 
this effort was the well-received Community Newsletter 
which brings together all Chelmsford governmental 
functions in order to educate and inform the citizens that 
we serve. In February 1995, the Community Service 
Council, which coordinates the newsletter, will put 
together a community event called WinterFest which 
hopefully will become an annual event for the 
Townspeople. 

The Town also moved forward on several other 
fronts in 1994 including improved land use management 
capacity through the hiring of Andrew Sheehan who will 
work with Conservation, Board of Appeals and the DPW 
in various infrastructure and community development 
projects. The Town also pushed forward with economic 



18 



development efforts including the production of a 
marketing brochure called Chelmsford: It Works . This 
effort was spearheaded by the Chelmsford Economic 
Development Partnership which is chaired by now former 
Selectman William Logan. Ongoing computerization 
occurred in 1994 with the implementation of a new 
financial software system and a public safety software. 
This latter effort is a crucial step in our long planned 
centralized dispatch with E-911 service. This service will 
be implemented in 1995. 

In addition to achieving certain goals in 1994, we 
also made dramatic progress in looking ahead to the 
future needs of the Town. The Center School reopening 
moved closer to reality with the funding of rehabilitation 
work of nearly $6 million of which 64% will be State 
funded. In 1994 we also made the first formalized 
presentation of a Five Year Plan which outlines 
maintenance of the status quo in services and the resulting 
impact upon capital needs, personnel costs, and other 
services that are experiencing greater demands. As a 
result of this Plan, I will in 1995 attempt to engage the 
citizenry in a Community Dialogue on the future of 
Chelmsford. This effort will seek input on our 
community needs and ideas for change. I urge you to 
become involved in this endeavor. 

With 1994 now behind us and 1995 upon us, I 
want to take this opportunity to thank the many qualified 
and committed employees and volunteers that give so 
much to the Town. In particular, I want to thank the staff 
of outstanding individuals that worked in the Executive 
Office, including Mary Casali, Judy Carter, Marian 
Currier, Diane Darling and Jeanne Parziale. I also want 
to thank the members of the Board of Selectmen for their 
support and direction over the past twelve months 
including Jeffrey Brem, Roger Blomgren, William 
Dalton, Richard DeFreitas, Robert Joyce, Peter Lawlor 
and William Logan. 



19 



Finally, I want to thank the citizens of Chelmsford 
for the opportunity to serve as your Town Manager. I 
will continue to work for you to bring financial stability 
and quality to our municipal government. 

Sincerely, 



Bernard F. Lynch 
Town Manager 




20 



TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St. Hilaire, CMC, CMMC 
Town Clerk 

Elizabeth L. Delaney 
Assistant Town Clerk 

Sandra A. Kilburn 

Janet M. Hart 

Katherine M. Kalicki 



The Town Clerk staff dedicates the following 
space in memory of our fellow employee Elizabeth K. 
Ferreira, Principal Clerk, who passed away April 8, 
1994. 



"She was Liz, Lizzie, Savi. Wife, mother, daughter, 
sister. Our sparkle, our imp, our sense of humor, our 
friend and co-worker. She left her mark on the Town 
Clerk's Office and to all who knew and loved her. It was 
a privilege to have known her. She and her smile will 
truly be missed. " 



21 



TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St. Hilaire, CMC, CMMC 
Town Clerk 

Elizabeth L. Delaney 
Assistant Town Clerk 

Sandra A. Kilburn 

Janet M. Hart 

Katherine M. Kalicki 



Sporting Licenses 
1,043 

Kennel Licenses 
5 

Birth Inc. 
362 



Deaths 

273 



Dog Licenses 
2,750 

Intentions 

232 

Marriages 
233 



NOTE: Any and all Election/Town Meeting 
results/minutes can be found starting on 
page 155). 



22 




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23 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Board of Health Members: 

Paul J. Canniff, Chairman 
Peter Dulchinos, Vice-Chairman 
Paul F. McCarthy, Clerk 

Health Department Personnel: 

Richard J. Day, Director of Public Health 
John P. Emerson, Asst. Director/Health Inspector 
Diana L. Wright, Departmental Assistant 
Judith Dunigan, R.N., Town Nurse 
Eric P. Kaplan, M.D., Town Physician 

Septage and Wastewater Abatement Program 

In 1994 the Septage and Wastewater Abatement 
Program continued its effort to clean up our waterways. 
The Board of Health, with the advent of a central sewer 
system in the Town of Chelmsford, is now embarking on 
certain enforcement activities to insure compliance with 
local by-laws which will insure a safe water supply. Dye 
testing, water sampling and issuance of septic system 
permits will continue in all the non-sewered areas. 

Administration and Management 

Income for various services and permits is listed 
below: 



Percolation Tests-57 


$ 2,850 


Deep Tests-79 


3,950 


Sewage Repair Permits-28 


700 


Sewage Construction Permits-39 


2,450 


Miscellaneous License & Fees 


17.948 




$31,965 



During 1994 six inspections were made at existing 
day care centers; two-hundred one inspections were made 
for Chapter II Housing; eight school inspections; 
six-hundred one complaints received and checked; Camp 
Paul inspections; thirty bathing beaches inspections; three 



24 



International Certificates of Vaccination, restaurants and 
retail food store inspections, one-hundred thirty 
establishments in town inspected twice a year. 

Hazardous Waste and Industrial Wastewater Program 

Richard J. Day (Director of Public Health) was 
reappointed by the Board of Selectmen as the town's 
Hazardous Waste Coordinator and Municipal Coordinator 
to enforce the "Right-to-Know" law for this town. 

The Board of Health held two Household Hazardous 
Waste Collection Days this year which were held on May 
7, 1994 and October 1, 1994. We properly disposed of 
the following quantities of materials: 

1 . 60 barrels of Hazardous Materials 

2. 1 ,000+ Gallons of Automotive Waste Oil 

3. 145 Car Batteries 

New Protocols for the Protection of the Public Health 

"Rabies" - 1994 was another productive year for 
the Board of Health. During this time frame the Board of 
Health implemented, initiated or upgraded protocol to 
control the spread of Rabies. We instituted a number of 
rabies clinics to vaccine the unprotected cat and dog 
population in Town. Dr. Gruber and Dr. Holub ran our 
clinics. 

Communicable Disease Program 

Reports of the following diseases were completed 
during 1994 for the Massachusetts Department of Public 
Health: 

Tuberculosis 2 

Hepatitis B 6 

Hepatitis C 3 

Salmonella 23 

Campylobacter Enteritis 13 

Giardiasis 6 



25 



Tuberculosis Control Program* 7 

Meningitis 1 

Lyme Disease 1 

* Referrals received form the Lowell Chest Clinic and 
Middlesex Community Hospital TB Clinic. 

The testing of persons exposed to tuberculosis and 
those persons whose employment require certification of 
freedom from that disease is another responsibility of the 
Town Nurse. One-hundred Eighty-four Mantoux (TB) 
tests were given to town residents for pre-employment 
and to household contacts of active cases in compliance 
with the Massachusetts Department of Public Health 
regulations. Home visits and telephone calls are made to 
families of active and some inactive tuberculosis cases on 
a periodic basis to insure understanding of the illness and 
that adequate medical follow-up is achieved. Numerous 
medical records are kept and updated on residents who 
have a positive (TB) Mantoux test and are receiving 
medication prophylactically and being following 
radiologically at the Lowell Chest Program and 
Middlesex TB Clinic. When necessary, TB testing is 
done at places of business if employees are exposed to an 
active case of TB. 

Immunization Program 

The Board of Health sponsored two flu clinics this 
year. Thirty-nine persons were immunized with 
pneumonia vaccine and one-thousand two-hundred 
persons were immunized with flu vaccine at clinics. 
Additional doses were given to nursing homes, Adult 
Retarded Citizens, employees, eighteen home visits were 
made to handicapped or house-bound residents and fifty 
doses to McFarlin Manor and Chelmsford Arms 
residents. A total of one-thousand six-hundred fifty doses 
of flu vaccine were administered in town. 



26 



One-hundred sixty immunizations were administered 
to adults and students in compliance with the 
Massachusetts Immunizations Laws and prophylactically 
to residents traveling to underdeveloped countries. 

Hypertension Screening Program 

Blood pressure screenings for residents are held the 
first Thursday of every month from 9:00 to 12:00 at the 
Board of Health, Town Offices. Five-hundred seventeen 
residents attended the screenings. 

Cholesterol Screening Program 

Cholesterol screenings were offered to residents 
several times during the year. A nominal fee was 
charged and the dates were announced in the newspapers 
several weeks prior to the screening. One-hundred 
sixty-two residents attended the screenings. 

Lead Paint Screening Program 

The Board of Health offers lead paint testing for 
children between the ages of nine months and six years. 
Residents may call the Health Department at 250-5243 
and make an appointment with the nurse. Forty children 
were screened for lead paint. 

Other screenings offered by the Board of Health 
include Diabetes and Mammography. Dates of these 
programs will be advertised in advance. 

A Health Fair will be held in conjunction with 
Westford every other year, finances permitting. This 
year's Health Fair is in Westford, Saturday, May 13, 
1995 from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm. All Chelmsford 
residents eighteen years and older are welcome. 



27 



CENTRAL MASSACHUSETTS 
MOSQUITO CONTROL PROJECT 



The Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control 
Project (CMMCP) now provides its services to twenty 
seven cities and towns throughout Middlesex and 
Worcester Counties. The project is pleased to announce 
that the towns of Stow and Blackstone became members 
of the CMMCP as of July 1, 1994. Several other towns 
will be considering joining the project at their spring town 
meetings. This growth helps us achieve regional 
mosquito control. 

The project is headquartered in a modern facility 
located at 111 Otis Street, Northboro, MA. Tours of the 
headquarters or visits to field work sites can be arranged 
by calling the office in advance. 

The project utilizes an Integrated Pest 
Management approach to mosquito control. This type of 
a program blends several methods and techniques with 
expertise, experience, and scientific research to provide 
the member communities with modern environmentally 
sound, cost effective mosquito control. 

Our public education efforts again this year were 
highlighted by the Mosquito Awareness Program offered 
to all elementary schools within the project. Project staff 
meet with students and teachers to discuss mosquito 
biology, mosquito habitat, and what they and their 
families can do to prevent mosquitoes from breeding 
around their homes. The program includes a slide talk 
show, handouts and coloring books, samples of live 
mosquito larvae, and the opportunity for students and 
teachers to ask questions. 

The project's Water Management Programs 
continue to show positive results. By cleaning clogged 
and overgrown waterways, mosquito breeding is reduced, 
wetlands are restored, and water quality is improved. 



28 



This form of mosquito control although labor intensive 
yields great dividends and helps to reduce the dependence 
on pesticides. 

Areas where mosquito larvaes are found are 
treated with BTi mosquito larvicide to prevent their 
emergence. We encourage the public to notify us as to 
any areas they suspect could breed mosquitoes. Field 
crews will investigate all such sites and treat as needed. 

The project strives to handle all mosquito 
problems with water management or larviciding but 
recognizes that there are times when adult mosquito 
spraying is the only viable solution. In such cases 
residential and recreational areas are treated with either 
handheld or pick-up truck mounted sprayers. 

The project's surveillance program monitors adult 
mosquito and larval population density and is the 
backbone for prescribing various control techniques. 

The project's video "Working for You" is 
available to anyone interested in learning more about 
mosquito control and the services provided by the Central 
Massachusetts Mosquito Control Project. 



29 



DEPARTMENT OF 
PUBLIC WORKS 

ENGINEERING DIVISION 

Department Member: 

George LeMasurier, Assistant Town Engineer 

The Engineering Division this year assisted other 
departments with matters relating to drainage, layouts, 
property line determination, trees, grading, tax maps, 
etc.. The Engineering Division reviewed fourteen (14) 
subdivisions and eight (8) site plans for the Planning 
Board. The engineers worked closely with the Planning 
Board in amending their subdivision rules and 
regulations. Engineering inspected new construction on 
twelve (12) streets. Engineering assisted in the layout 
and grading of the handicap ramp at the police station, 
the handicap parking space at the McKay Library, 
parking and handicap walkway at the Old Town Hall, the 
paving of Shore Drive over the Freeman Lake Dam, and 
the septic system repair at the police station. Engineering 
provided the survey, design layout, and the staking for 
striping of the parking lot behind the Town Hall. 
Engineering inspected and prepared cost estimates for the 
re-surfacing of eighteen (18) streets, prepared the 
specifications for the bids, staking, and the inspection of 
6,610 feet of subdrain installation on seven (7) streets. 
The construction of the Middlesex Street Bridge deck 
repair was inspected and approved. The sidewalk 
improvement project consisted of the construction of 
sidewalks on Davis Road, Crooked Spring Road, and 
Richardson Road where layout, inspections, grading, 
drainage analysis, and curb elevations were provided by 
the Division. Engineering also worked with the Russell 
Road abutters, the Conservation and Recreation 
Commissions, and Town Counsel to provide access and 
handicap parking at Varney Beach area. 



30 



HIGHWAY DIVISION 

Department Members: 

John Long, Superintendent 
Roy Costa, Foreman 
Lawrence Ferreira, Foreman 
Marie Burns, Principal Clerk 
Gary Beaulieu, Operator 
Kenneth Burroughs, Laborer 
Robert Dearborn, Driver 
Dennis Greenwood, Operator 
Richard Jensen, Mechanic 
Arthur Newcomb, Grader 
Raymond Maybury, Operator 
Joseph Eriksen, Driver 
Audie Boudreau, Driver 
David Palmer, Driver 
David Eacrett, Driver 
Todd Chase, Driver 
David Irvine, Driver 
Paul Winegar, Driver 

The Highway Division is responsible for the 
regular maintenance of streets, culverts, catch basins and 
manholes, street signs, traffic signs and traffic signals for 
approximately 200 miles of roadway. Additionally, the 
Highway Division clears the streets and public lots of 
snow and ice, and assists other departments with the 
division's equipment and expertise of the crew. 

Streets Re-Surfaced 

Sprague Avenue - Entire 

Carleton Road - Entire 

Byam Road - Entire 

Pinehill Road - Westford Street to Hunt Road 

Abbott Lane - Westford Street to Griffin Road 

Steadman Street - Rt. 3 to Lowell City Line 

Edson Street - Entire 

Marshall Street - Entire 

Parkerville Road - Maple Road to Westford Town Line 

Robin Hill Road - Locust Street to Rt. 27 

Grandview Road - Entire 



31 



Handicapped ramps were installed at the Old 
Town Hall, Police Station and McKay Library. 

All drains in Farms I were reconstructed prior to 
the pavement overlay by the Sewer Commission. 
Subdrains were installed on Sprague Avenue, Horseshoe 
Road, Draycoach Road, Byam Road, Amble Road, Robin 
Hill Road and Grandview Road. 

Sidewalks were constructed on Davis Road, 
Richardson Road and Crooked Spring Road. 

During the winter the Town faced the largest 
amount of snowfall on record in over fifty years. Over 
one hundred inches of snow fell and was handled by the 
dedicated employees and hired contractors who often 
worked extended periods without sleep in order to 
maintain open roads so the emergency vehicles could 
access every property. The men did a terrific job fighting 
19 different storms. The mechanics kept the equipment 
in proper operating condition, with very few extended 
mechanical failures. 

In May, Foreman Roy Costa suffered a massive 
heart attack and has been on extended sick leave to this 
date. We all wish him a speedy recovery and look 
forward to his return. 



32 



PARKS DIVISION 

Department Members: 
Edward Jamros, Groundskeeper 
Eric Newman, Part Time Laborer 

The Parks Division maintains all the parks, traffic 
islands, ballfields, playgrounds, and commons under the 
control of the Town. The grounds are groomed each 
Spring and prepared for the heavy use each area is 
subjected to during the year. The Division employees 
perform an exceptional job each year preparing the Town 
Common area for the annual July 4th celebration. 
Equally important is the job of restoring the damaged 
areas resulting from the activities. 

Special projects this year included the installation 
of underground sprinklers at the Varney Field baseball 
diamond. Special thanks go to the North Chelmsford 
Water District for their cooperation with the connection 
work and their special consideration of water supply. 
Storage facilities and other maintenance projects were 
completed in the Old Town Hall during the winter 
months. Ed Jamros also assisted the Highway Division 
with their snow and ice battles. 

The large flagpole at the Town Common was 
scraped and painted in time for the July 4th festivities. 

Special recognition goes to Dick Codling, Dick 
Burkinshaw, Chelmsford Rotary, Chelmsford Garden 
Club, Stott Landscaping, for their participating in the 
"Adopt-a-Park" program. 



33 



PUBLIC BUILDINGS DIVISION 

Department Members: 

Theodore Godfroy, Superintendent 
Gerald Johnson, Custodian 
David Grimshaw, Custodian 

This year's special projects included: 

The installation of a new rubber roof over the gym 
area of the Town Hall Offices. 

Upgrades to the ramp and railing in the rear of the 
Town Hall to conform with ADA regulations. 

The addition of a service window to the 
Treasurer's Office. 

The installation of a screening fence around the 
dumpsters at the Old Town Hall and Town Hall 
Offices. 

The fabrication and installation of air conditioner 
covers to minimize heat loss during the winter 
months. 

Utilizing the Senior Citizen Program administered 
by Marty Walsh of the Senior Center, the doors and 
frames in the Town Offices common areas were painted. 

Improvement are being made to the Old Town 
Hall to bring the auditorium into compliance with the 
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). 

In September the department suffered the sudden 
and unexpected passing of Head Custodian, Patrick 
Murtagh, a twenty year employee of the Town. Patrick 
will be fondly remembered for his outgoing personality 
and will be missed. The vacated position was filled by 
David Grimshaw. David's experience in the maintenance 
and custodial field, most recently working as a custodian 
with the Chelmsford School system, is an asset to this 
division. 



34 



SEWER DIVISION 

Department Members: 

James Casparro, Inspector 
Joseph Witts, Maintenance Mechanic 
Michael Vosnakis, Maintenance Technician 
Evelyn Newman, Department Assistant 
Jacqueline Sheehy, Principal Clerk 
Gail Loiselle, Part Time Clerk 

The Sewer Division continued to expand again this 
year with the addition of the Brian Road pump station, 
bringing the total number of pump stations to thirteen. 
On-line sewer users have increased by 616 over the past 
year for a total of almost 3,500. 

With new sewer construction continuing to expand 
into more areas of the Town the office staff keeps 
extremely busy preparing and processing the Sewer 
Betterment Assessments, Sewer User bills, the Sewer 
Commission agendas, meeting minutes, contracts, and 
general correspondence. They also process the expense 
vouchers for other DPW Divisions, as well as the 
payrolls. 

With the expected arrival of four (4) new pump 
stations slated for the Spring 1995, the division is 
currently in the process of increasing personnel to handle 
the new influx of hook-ups, billing, operation and 
maintenance, and other duties that grow with new 
additions to the system. 

Thanks go to the Highway and Parks Divisions 
and the three Water Districts for their cooperation and 
assistance during the year. With their help we were able 
to keep the system operating smoothly. Thanks go to the 
Fire and Police Departments for monitoring the pumping 
stations alarm system. Special thanks go to the Sewer 
Commission for their cooperation throughout the year. 



35 



In summary I would like to thank both the clerical 
staff and the various maintenance, mechanical operation 
and supervisory staff members for the efforts displayed 
during a very difficult winter season and throughout the 
remainder of the year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

James E. Pearson, P.E. 
Director of Public Works 



36 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 



Gerald L. Hardy, Chairman 
James F. Dolan 
Jean F. McCaffery 

The Cemetery Commission is pleased to report to 
the citizens of Chelmsford some major accomplishments 
of 1994. 

The Commission continued special restoration 
projects in Forefathers' Burying Ground and Riverside 
Cemetery. In Forefathers', a slate sign was relettered and 
six monuments were restored over the tombs. A Civil 
War veteran's monument, provided by the Veterans 
Administration, was replaced by the department staff. In 
Riverside, fourteen damaged "tablet-style" monuments 
were restored. To continue this work, the Commission is 
actively pursuing grant funding through the Massachusetts 
Historical Commission's Preservation Projects Fund. 

The department initiated an enhanced preventive 
maintenance program for our equipment and vehicles. 
This program will reduce long-term maintenance 
expenses and extend the expected useful life of the 
equipment and vehicles. 

A new flower garden was planted near the main 
entrance to West Chelmsford Cemetery. Our staff also 
cleared and prepared an area adjacent to Section E in 
Heart Pond Cemetery for future development. 

During the past year, a number of longstanding lot 
owner concerns were addressed by a program developed 
by Superintendent John Sousa. Mr. Sousa, using a 
significant background in retail management, applied the 
Total Quality Management concept to cemetery 
operations. This has resulted in public concerns being 



37 



addressed in a more timely manner to the mutual 
satisfaction of the lot owners and the Town. The 
satisfaction of the lot owners and visitors of the Town 
cemeteries remains the Commission's first priority. 

The Commission is pleased to note that numerous 
compliments were received on the maintenance of the six 
cemeteries under our control during the past year. The 
Commission commends the department staff for their 
outstanding efforts. 

The Commission wishes to acknowledge and 
express our thanks to Mrs. Jane Drury for her continuing 
work on the Completion of an inventory of historical 
gravestones in Riverside Cemetery. 

The Commission also thanks the Sewer 
Commission and the Sewer Division of the DPW for their 
assistance in connecting cemetery garage and office 
building to the Town sewer system. 

There were 144 interments during the year. 
Cremation interments totaled 24 and accounted for 17% 
of total interments. 

There were 104 lots sold during the year. This 
represents a 33% increase in lot sales primarily due to 
pre-need sales. There was one incident of vandalism in 
the cemeteries. 

Receipts turned over to the Town in 1994 include: 

Sale of Graves & Lots $15,875 

Interments & Other Fees 51,106 

Foundation Installations 1 1 .470 

TOTAL $78,451 



38 



Cemetery Department Personnel: 

John Sousa, Jr. , Superintendent 
Jorge Caires, Working Foreman 
Kenneth Frazier, Backhoe Operator 
Patrick Caires, Truck Driver 
Eileen Johnson, P.T. Clerk 
Jose Teixeira, Seasonal Landscaper 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Gerald L. Hardy, 
Chairman 



39 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 
ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 



Department Members: 

Jean Sullivan, Town Accountant 

Renee Young, Assistant Town Accountant 

Patricia Tucker, Principal Clerk 

Christine Dowd, Payroll Coordinator 

In FY 1994 implementation of an in-house 
computer system encompassing general ledger, accounts 
payable, and cash receipts was completed. The 
Accounting and Data Processing Departments are 
currently working with the outside software company to 
fine tune these systems to meet the needs of the Town. 

Respectfully Submitted, 



Jean Sullivan 
Town Accountant 



40 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Board Members: 

Diane M. Phillips, MAA, Chairman 
Bruce A. Symmes, CMA, RMA, MAA 
Joseph B. Shanahan, Sr. 

Eric R. Josephson, MAA, Assistant Assessor 
Nancy L. Maher, Administrative Assistant 
Elaine McBride, Principal Clerk 
Elaine Myers, Principal Clerk 

This year the office started the revaluation for 
FY95. It will be the first time that we will be doing most 
of the certification ourselves. Looking at the sales it 
appears that there will be a significant drop in the 
commercial and industrial values. Residential values will 
vary according to sales analysis. Some types of 
residential properties will drop in value, while others will 
go up in value. A decrease in value does not necessarily 
mean that your taxes will go down. When the value goes 
down, the tax rate goes up. There does seem to be an 
upward trend in the market, hopefully things will improve 
by next year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Board of Assessors 



41 



DATA PROCESSING 



Fiscal Year 1994 was a busy one for the Data 
Processing Department. The Accounting/Town, 

IBM/UNIX system has been in operation for about a year 
and is used by the Accounting, Data Processing and 
Treasurer's Department. The Novell network has 
expanded to allow the Sewer Department access to the 
Assessor's database. 

The Police/Fire Department's computer system was 
installed this year into the Central and East Fire Houses. 
The Police have completed their installation. 

A communication server was installed for use by 
all Town employees to access bulletin boards relating to 
their respective departments. The capacity of this server 
will also allow all outside departments to call into the 
Town's network and access data files. 

Also installed was a scanner for use by all 
departments to incorporate pictures, drawings, etc. into 
documentation. 

FY96 goals include the continuing upgrade to the 
Novell System. The Fire Departments (North, South and 
West) installation and connection to the Police/Fire 
System. The Police/Fire System connection to the Town 
Offices via the Accounting/Town's Unix System and or 
the Town's Novell network. Phase III of the 
Accounting/Town's Unix system. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Judy Dunn 

Data Processing Coordinator 



42 



TREASURER/TAX COLLECTOR BRANCH 



Department Members: 

Charles F. Mansfield, Finance Director 

Carol R. Lambert, Assistant Treasurer 

Bettie A. Osborne, Departmental Assistant 

Judith A. Olsson, Part-time, Legal Clerk 

Joan L. Garland, Data Processing Clerk 

Anna M. Griffin, Accounts Payable/Receivable Clerk 

Aided by an improved economy and conservative 
budgeting practices, the Town's financial position has 
improved significantly in the past fiscal year. Property 
taxes provide the majority of revenues and current 
collections have increased in the fiscal year due in part to 
aggressive collection procedures. As of the end of 1994, 
the General Fund balance stood at 5 % of revenues with 
the undesignated portion at 3.8% of revenues. 1994 our 
strengthened financial position enabled the Town to 
transfer $830,000 into the Stabilization Fund for future 
capital projects. 

Respectfully Submitted, 



Charles F. Mansfield 
Finance Director 



43 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



The Fire Department realized an increase in 
emergency responses in 1994 of 7.6% or 242 calls over 
1993. The two major areas of increased activity were in 
actual fires up 22% and emergency medical responses, up 
27 % . Areas of decreased activity were in mutual aid and 
its surrounding communities, down 38%, service calls, 
down 10% and false alarms, down 55%. 

A complete overhaul of the emergency medical 
first response system took place during 1994. 
Twenty-four (24) firefighters were trained to the 
emergency medical technician level and all first response 
vehicles were outfitted with new medical equipment to 
reflect this upgrade in emergency medical care. Fire 
apparatus is now dispatched to all medical calls from the 
nearest station. With this new emergency response 
system, we are able to provide the towns people with an 
E.M.T. level of service in under two (2) minutes. This 
response system is second to none. 

Five (5) semi-automated heart defibrillators were 
purchased for the department through the fund raising 
efforts of the Emblem Club and the Firefighters Union 
Local 1839. All fire department members were trained in 
the use of this life saving machine and one unit was 
placed on each of the five engine companies. This will 
provide for equal distribution throughout the town. 

Deputy Chief Sousa has instituted a new 
firefighter training program in an effort to train all 
department firefighters to the National Standard of 
Firefighter I and II. The program will take two (2) years 
to complete and will train our firefighters to a higher 
standard along with a more consistent manner in 
performing various emergency tasks. 



44 



Budget restraints have forced the alternating 
closures of Engine 3 (Old Westford Road) and Engine 4 
(Riverneck Road) thirty (30) times in the last six (6) 
months of 1994. In addition, the Center Fire Station has 
been forced to run staffing levels from one (1) captain 
and five (5) firefighters down to one (1) captain and two 
(2) firefighters in order to stay within the FY95 budget. 
It is hoped that in FY96 funding will be made available to 
keep staffing levels up and all stations manned. 

The goals for the up coming year are to move and 
combine fire dispatch with the police department 
dispatch, investigate the feasibility of in-house fire 
department based ambulance, and to integrate the newly 
installed "Fire Track" computer system into our 
emergency response system. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager, the 
Board of Selectmen, all other town offices along with the 
members of the Chelmsford Fire Department and my 
office staff for their help and cooperation over the past 
year. 



Respectfully Submitted, 



John E. Parow 
Fire Chief 



45 



DEPARTMENTAL PERSONNEL 

Fire Chief 

John E. Parow 

Deputy Chief 

James A. Sousa 

Captains 

James M. Spinney WM Michael Burke 

James P. Boermeester Charles A. Schramm 

Michael F. Curran 



Walter F. Adley 
Martin Boermeester 
William V. Cady 
David Campbell 
William Campbell 
John Carroll 
Anthony Cincevich 
David Clancy 
Kevin Clarke 
Mark F. Conlin 
James F. Curran 
William Curran 
William Dalton 
John Depalma 
Michael Donoghue 
Bruce Donovan 
Donald Drew 
James J. Durkin 
Jesse Foster 
Ernest Frobese 
David Hadley 
William Hadley 
PaulD. Hayes 
Henry A. Houle 
William Jamer 



Firefighters 

Dennis Keohane 
William Keohane 
Raymond R. Kydd 
Emil Magiera 
Leo F. Manley 
Leo Martin 
Michael McTeague 
Leslie Merrill 
Richard Miller 
Edward J. Nolet 
Kevin O'Brien 
Donald E. Peterson 
Daniel T. Reid 
James F. Reid 
John E. Reid 
Michael Ridlon 
Arthur Rivard 
John Robinson 
Gary Ryan 
George E. Ryan 
Kevin M. Sheehy 
Joseph Spinazola 
Brian Stanton 
J. Daniel Ubele 
Dennis Vargeletis 
Peter Johnson 



Principal Clerk 

Martha A. DeSaulnier 

Senior Clerk 

Patricia A. Britton 

Mechanic 

James Keeley 

Civilian Dispatchers 

David DeFreitas Michael Cassella 

Richard Demers Terrance A. Goode 

William Vaughan Will Amundson 

Timothy Goode 



46 



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47 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I herein respectfully submit for your information 
and review the Annual Report of the Police Department for 
the year 1994. 

At the present time, the Department is made up of 
46 permanent Officers. 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Armand J. Caron 

LIEUTENANTS 

Steven A. Burns Raymond G. McCusker 

Francis X. Roark 

SERGEANTS 

Paul E. Cooper James F. Murphy 

J. Ronald Gamache Timothy F. O'Connor 

Francis P. Kelly E. Michael Rooney 

John O.Walsh 

DEPARTMENT CRIMINAL PROSECUTOR 
LOWELL DISTRICT COURT 

Sergeant Robert M. Burns 

INSPECTORS 

James T. Finnegan Peter C. McGeown 

Jared S. Finnegan Brian F. Mullen 

CRIME PREVENTION OFFICER 

Gail F. Hunter 

D.A.R.E. OFFICER 

Todd D. Ahern 

TRAFFIC DIVISION 

Sgt. Scott R. Ubele 
Richard A. Adams Roland E. Linstad 

Daniel J. Ahern Paul E. Richardson 



48 



PATROL OFFICERS 

Bruce A. Darwin Robert J. Murphy, Jr. 

John J. Donovan Thomas A. Niemaszyk 

Patrick W. Daley Edward F. Quinn 

Kenneth R. Duane John E. Redican 

Philip R. Dube, Jr. Chandler J. Robinson 

Francis J. Goode, Jr. Colin E. Spence 

Richard D. Hallion James M. Spinney, Jr. 

Martin W. Krikorian Michael M. Stott 

Russell H. Linstad Francis P. Teehan 

David F. MacKenzie, Jr. Robert J. Trudel 

John C. McGeown William R. Walsh 
Ernest R. Woessner, Jr. 

FULL-TIME CIVILIAN DISPATCHERS 

William G. Amundson Frederick F. Flynn, Jr. 

Gloria Armstrong Frank C. Lane 

Barbara J. Ducharme Michael L. Taplin 

PART-TIME CIVILIAN DISPATCHERS 

Mary Jo Fitton Laura B. Raffaelo 

PRINCIPAL CLERKS 

Marie K. DiRocco Mary Jane Grant 

Donna Fox 

SENIOR CLERK 

Elizabeth A. Ripaldi 

JUNIOR CLERK 

Margaret E. Greenhalgh 

MATRONS 

Gloria Armstrong Donna Fox 

Barbara J. Ducharme Laura Raffaelo 

Mary Jo Fitton Donna Shaw 

Carol Tabor 



49 



RECEIPTS TURNED OVER TO TOWN 





1993 


1994 


Photocopying Machines $ 


3,047.50 


3,352.00 


Firearms Permits 


3,255.00 


3,780.00 


Bicycle Registrations 


5.00 


1.50 


Firearms Identification Cards 


486.00 


442.00 


Court Fines Revenue 


28,414.00 


27,092.00 


Registry of Motor Vehicles 


79,322.50 


136,749.00 


Photographs 


580.00 


720.00 


Police Details— Service Charge 


51,507.87 


28,003.38 


False Alarm Fees 


5,225.00 


1,300.00 


Alarm Permit Fees 





8,525.00 


Parking Fines 


9,980.00 


14,795.00 


Restitution 


1,245.00 


1,273.00 



Total Receipts Returned 

To The Town: $183,067.87 $226,032.88 



ARRESTS 

1994 

Males Arrested 562 

Females Arrested 106 



Total Arrests 668 



50 



BREAKDOWN OF ARRESTS 







1994 


Adult Arrests 




619 


Juvenile Arrests 




49 


Whites Arrested 




561 


Blacks Arrested 




22 


Asians Arrested 




15 


Unknowns Arrested 




70 


Charges logged against those arrests 




1,218 


CRIMES 


1993 


1994 


Crimes Against Persons 


84 


149 


Crimes Against Property 


145 


186 


Crimes Against Public Order 


182 


883 


DISPOSITION OF CASES 

1993 


1994 


Placed on Probation 


32 


26 


Suspended Sentence/Placed on File 


26 


26 


Placed on File 


6 


11 


Not Guilty Finding 


2 


2 


Dismissed with Probable Cause 


44 


30 



51 



1993 



1994 



Court Costs & Continued Without 
Finding 


4 


34 


Committed to Youth Services 
Board 


1 


7 


Committed to House of Correction, 
Billerica 


23 


34 


Turned Over to Other Courts/ 
Police Departments 


93 


159 



Cases Pending & Continued 
In Court 



124 



879 



Placed in Alcohol Safety Program 

(ASAP) 



11 



MISCELLANEOUS STATISTICS 



19 



Calls Answered by Cruisers 


19,773 


22,012 


Summons Served 


467 


441 


Licenses Suspended/Revoked 


941 


1,184 


Accidents Reports 


1,100 


674 


Fatal Accidents 


8 


3 


Personal Injury Accidents 


336 


170 


Mileage of Cruisers 


432,700 


471,996 


Station Lockups 


411 


667 


Citations Issued 


1,629 


3,634 



52 



Parking Violations Issued 


1993 

506 


1994 

530 


Protective Custody 


50 


92 


Restraining Orders Served 


107 


97 


False Alarms Responded to 
by Cruisers 


1,073 


1,250 



TRAINING AND SCHOOLS ATTENDED 

Patrol Officers Basic Police Academy 7 

Sergeants Basic Training Course 5 

Infrared Breath Test Re-certification Instructor 1 

MP5 Instructor Training 1 

Advanced Law Enforcement Training 

With Older Americans 2 

Commercial Drivers License Instructor Training 1 

Arson Fraud 1 

Traveling Criminals Conference 2 

Identi-Kit School 1 

Crime Prevention Officer School 1 

Drunk Driving Legislation 1 

Street Level Drug Enforcement 1 



53 



Domestic Violence Investigations 2 

Domestic Violence Investigations/ 

Warrantless Searches 2 

Domestic Violence Investigations/ 

Search Warrants 2 

Child Abuse/Exploitation Investigative 
Techniques 

Managing Juvenile Operations 

Use of Oleoresin Capsicum Instructor 

Use of Oleoresin Capsicum 

Contemporary Concepts in Background 
Investigations 

Vehicle Accident Investigations 3 

MISSION STATEMENT AND INITIATIVES 

The Mission of the Chelmsford Police Department is 
centered around 7 goals: 

1. Finalize the restructuring of the Patrol Force and 
Special Services Bureau. This Police Department will 
become more pro-active than reactive, also reducing 
overtime costs to an acceptable level. 

2. Implementing Enhanced 911 along with finalizing and 
implementing central dispatch. This should enable the 
Department to see considerable savings in overtime 
costs for dispatching in both Police and Fire 
Departments. 



54 



3. Forming and implementing a Domestic Violence Unit, 
which is one of our top priorities. This will allow us to 
address some of the most growing concerns in the Town 
of Chelmsford, as well as in the nation. 

4. Implementing a full-time Community Policing Program 
with the information that we've collected, analyzed and 
evaluated in conjunction with our Community Crime 
Survey. This will allow us to address the needs of the 
residents in the business community, thus reducing 
crime and the fear of crime. 

5. Implementing and over-seeing a D.A.R.E. Program in 
the Middle Schools, as a result of obtaining a State 
D.A.R.E. Grant, thus continuing our never-ending fight 
against alcohol and drug abuse. 

6. Continue to upgrade the computer system and form a 
partnership with 10 other communities operating under 
the same computer network. This would enable us to 
share a central repository system for sharing 
investigatory information. 

7. Expand our Crime Prevention Program, thereby 
reducing the number of crimes in this community. 



ACHIEVEMENTS 

The Chelmsford Police Department has realized impressive 
achievements in the past 12 months and are listed as follows: 

1. Nine new Patrol Officers were trained to fill vacancies 
resulting from retirements and lay-offs. This allowed us 
to re-establish valuable positions and formulate a 
5-^nan Traffic Bureau. 



55 



2. The Department received $450,000.00 from a Federally 
funded Crime Bill to be dispensed over a three year 
period, allowing us to add 6 new Patrol Officers. These 
Officers will be used primarily to patrol business and 
residential neighborhoods. 

3. The Department was awarded a State funded 
Community Policing Grant in the amount of $7,457.15. 
This enabled us to fund a community policing crime 
survey, giving us more insight, awareness and 
perception of citizens concerns. 

4. The Department was also awarded a State funded 
Governor's Highway Safety Bureau Grant in the 
amount of $5,000.00, to target O.U.I. (Operating Under 
the Influence) and Speed Enforcement. 

5. A D.A.R.E. Grant in the amount of $17,678.73 was 
received and will be used to fund a full time Drug 
Awareness Education Officer within the Middle 
Schools. 

6. Finalized the last phase of fully computerizing the 
Chelmsford Police Department. 

7. Completed all necessary renovations to the Chelmsford 
Police Department to comply with the A.D.A. 
(American Disabilities Act). 

8. Completed all necessary modifications and renovations 
to the dispatch area for the implementation of 
Enchanced 911. 



56 



GOALS 

OneofthemaingoalsoftheChelmsfordPoliceDepartmenl 
in the next 12 months, will be the centralized dispatch of the 
Police and Fire Departments. This centralized dispatch will set 
the stage for Enchanced 911, which will be operational in the 
Fall of 1995. 

I would like to thank the Town Manager, the Board of 
Selectmen, and all Town Departments for the cooperation they 
have given to the Police Department during the past year. 

I would also like to express my appreciation to all the 
Auxiliary Police for their continued dedication and support and 
to all the Members of the Police Department for the 
professionalism and dedication exhibited during the past 12 
months. 

Respectfully Submitted, 
Chief Armand J. Caron 



57 



AUXILIARY POLICE REPORT 

The Auxiliary Police Department Members 
assisted the Regular Force at a number of events this past 
year, such as Memorial Day Parade, Flag Day 
Ceremonies, Chelmsford High School Graduation 
exercises, July 3rd and 4th festivities, Veteran's Day 
Celebrations, Halloween security for the schools and also 
Thanksgiving football security for the High School. The 
Auxiliary Officers also assisted the regulars at numerous 
motor vehicle accident scenes as well. The Officers of 
the Auxiliary donated a total of 9,450 man hours to the 
Town. Operation Property Check was a great success 
keeping vandalism to a minimum. The statistics were: 

Vacant House Checks 2,700 

School Checks 14,652 

Town Property Checks 16.200 

Total 33,552 

This preventative patrol by the Auxiliary prevents 
malicious destruction to Town property and saves 
property owners thousands of dollars annually. The 
Auxiliary Unit continues to sponsor the Law Enforcement 
Explorers Scout Post #370. Officers of the Auxiliary 
train these young men and women in traffic control, 
search techniques, firearms safety and other related law 
enforcement activities. 

I would like to thank the members of the 
Auxiliary, the Scouts and their families for donating so 
much of their time. Your volunteer assistance continues 
to make Chelmsford a better place to live. 

I would like to thank the Board of Selectmen and 
the Town Manager for their support, the Police Chief, the 
Superior Officers and the Patrol Officers of the Police 
Department for all their assistance and support over the 
past year. 

Respectfully Submitted. 
Lieutenant Raymond G. McCusker 



58 



AUXILIARY ROSTER 

Director-Lieutenant Raymond G. McCusker 
Chelmsford Police Department 



William G. Amundson 
Jeffrey A. Blodgett 
Timothy B. Bourke 
Mark Cianic 
Paul Dean 
Eric Gordon 
Michael A. Houston 
David Irvine 
David M. Leo 
Peter D. LoPilato 



Erik Merrill 
Robert J. Murphy 
Robin Clark Outridge 
Robert M. Outwater 
Bradford Poole 
Kevin Proulx 
Ralph Roscoe 
Craig E. Walsh 
David W. Walsh 
Gary R. White 



59 



OFFICE OF THE DOG OFFICER 
REPORT OF THE DOG OFFICER FOR 1994 




1993 


1994 


Citizen complaints answered 


1,335 


855 


Dogs picked up and taken to pound 


69 


46 


Violation citations issued 


7 


15 


Value of citation fines 


$300.00 


$475.00 


Funds turned into the Town for boarding 

and other fees collected $545.00 


$300.00 


Dead animals picked up from streets 


289 


66 


Stray dogs disposed of 


22 


26 


Dogs returned to owners 


47 


20 


Animal bite reports 


22 


23 


Total miles traveled 


12,573 


12,930 



It is a pleasure to report for 1994, the problem of 
rabid raccoons in the area has been reduced considerably. 
However, all wild animals should still be considered 
dangerous and not kept as pets. 

Two thousand, seven hundred dogs were licensed 
in Town. Overall, dog owners are doing an excellent job 
in keeping their pets under control and healthy. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

Franklin E. Warren 
Animal Control Officer 



60 



INSPECTIONS DEPARTMENT 

The Building Inspections Department has been 
extremely busy during 1994. There were 107 new single 
family dwellings, three commercial buildings, and one - 
110 unit built. A total of 2,891 permits were issued 
which includes permits for single family dwellings, 
additions, renovations, alterations, tenant fit-ups, 
electrical, plumbing and gas permits only. The 1994 
increase of single family dwellings reflects new 
subdivisions and/or cluster housing. 

PERMITS 
# Type Total Fees 

604 Building $161,234.50 

548 Electrical $ 25,742.00 

1 ,739 Plumbing & Gas $33.192.00 

Sub Total $220,168.50 

Plus Certificates of Inspection, 

Yard Sales, Weights & Seals, 

Signs $ 6.555.00 

Total $226,723.50 

I would like to thank Elaine Casey, Senior Clerk, 
Joseph Shaw, Local Inspector, Kenneth Kleynen, 
Plumbing and Gas Inspector, and Dennis Kane, Electrical 
Inspector, for their cooperation, professionalism, and 
expertise. 



Anthony F. Zagzoug 
Inspector of Buildings 



61 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 




(Front row 1-r) Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasurer; 
Lynda Warren, Chairman; Sarah Warner 

(Back row 1-r) D. Lorraine Lambert; John Cutter; 
Jaclyn Matzkin, Secretary; Nancy Knight, Vice-Chairman 



62 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Adams Library and Children's House 
25 Boston Road, Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Library 
Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 



Library Trustees: 

Lynda Warren, Chair 

Nancy Knight, Vice-Chair 

Elizabeth McCarthy, Treasurer 

Jaclyn Matzkin, Secretary 

D. Lorraine Lambert 

Sarah Warner 

*Susan Koeckhoven, resigned 8/2/94 

*John Cutter, appointed 9/26/94 

Circulation and Interlibrary Loan 

During 1994, the Library circulated 352,278 
items. In addition, there was a 66% increase in 
interlibrary loans from 1993 as patrons become more 
familiar with the on-line access to the Merrimack Valley 
Library Network's resources. The total number of 
registered borrowers increased by 1,535 for a total of 
30,634. The steady increase in library use was reflected 
in waiting lists not only for popular items and services. 

Reference Department 

The Reference Department specializes in helping 
residents with their information and research needs, 
answering over 11,000 queries in 1994. The Reference 
staff continued to assist with collection development and 
administered a grant awarded by the State to improve the 
Library's non-fiction collection. The most exciting and 



63 



most challenging new resource of the year was offered by 
library access to various networks, including the Internet, 
which provides answers from places as close as Concord 
and as far away as Saskatchewan. 

Community Service Department 

1994 saw the Library via its Community Services 
Department actively involved in many facets of the 
Community - discovering and filing needs by offering 
informational/educational programming and resources. 
These included programs on computers and job seeking, 
creativity and writing. 

The focus on community became even more 
evident with the Library's October forum, Keeping the 
Peace: A Community Venture. Over 40 participants from 
all facets of the community - the schools, Police, Health 
Department, churches, and media worked on a list of 
ideas for preventing violence and creating more sense of 
community. 

Our Young Writers' Club, partially funded by the 
Chelmsford Cultural Council, has proven to be a popular 
program for middle school students. 

Children's Department 

The year opened with work continuing on 
planning the making of a panel for the NAMES Project 
Quilt. The panel, honoring John Steptoe a popular 
children's author, was completed in early March with the 
participation of Chelmsford High School Art Department 
and students, adult volunteers, and the library community 
children. The panel was hung in the Children's 
Department until October when it was sent to the Boston 
chapter of the NAMES Project to be included in the 
national Quilt. 



64 



Over 700 children participated in the Summer 
Reading Program. 132 story times were held for over 
800 participants. Monthly visits from local daycares, 
preschools, Headstart Programs, scouting groups 
continued throughout the year. 

Anna C. MacKay Library 

An Open House was held at the MacKay Library 
on October 15, to celebrate the public opening of its 
handicapped access. Over sixty five people joined the 
Library Trustees and staff on this special occasion. 

180 children participated in the summer reading 
program and 85 children attended a magic show 
sponsored by the Friends of the Library during December 
vacation week. 

On a sad note, long time library volunteer and 
storyteller, Laura Husted died. She had been telling 
stories to the children of MacKay for over 8 years. 
Friends gave many donations to the book fund to 
commemorate Mrs. Husted's service and her dedication 
to the story time groups. 

Volunteers 

Volunteers worked throughout the year helping the 
staff with shelving, story times, newsletters, and the The 
Handbook of Chelmsford Organizations. Volunteers 
shelved books, assisted with taxes, tutored literacy, 
conducted programs, gardened, maintained equipment, 
filed and typed. 

The Friends' of the Library (Pat DeFrietas, 
President) annual book sale in September was the most 
successful sale to date. With the revenues for the book 
sale, the Friends presented a gift of $20,000 to the 
Library's Endowment Fund and purchased new computer 
equipment for the Library. In addition, the Friends 
continued to supply library museum passes, provide 
programming for all ages, and purchase books on tape. 



65 



Library Building Committee 

The 1993 Library Needs Study outlined major 
building problems which limited and in some cases 
prevented library use - lack of handicapped access, space, 
and parking. In 1994, the Library Building Committee 
planned "the vision" for future library service. In June, 
the Library Building Committee selected the Stubbins 
Associates to develop schematic designs and cost 
estimates for the Adams Library addition. The Stubbins 
Associates, Inc. of Cambridge, is an architectural, 
planning and interior design firm. The project architect is 
C. Ronald Ostberg and the project designer is Philip 
Siebert, a Chelmsford resident. The Committee, staff, 
and designers worked throughout the summer and the 
final plans were presented to the residents in November. 
The Library Trustees and Building Committee will be 
asking approval of these plans in 1995. 

The Year of the Library 

1994 saw the Endowment Committee working to 
establish a foundation on which to build a major fund 
raising campaign in 1995. The Year of the Library is an 
occasion for the celebration of past library services and an 
assessment of what needs to be undertaken as a new 
millennium approaches. The Centennial of the Adams 
Library will be on May 8, 1995. On May 8, 1994, the 
Committee launched "The Year of the Library" with an 
old fashioned turn-of-the-century picnic on the library 
grounds. 

Goals 

In 1995, the Library will continue to provide 
quality collections and services to residents, while 
working to secure approval and funding for the Adams 
Library renovation and expansion. As we look forward 
to an exciting year, special acknowledgment is given to 



66 



the Board of Trustees, the Library Building Committee, 
Endowment Committee, Friends of the Library, the 
library staff, and all our library volunteers and patrons for 
making 1994 a successful year. 

Statistical Reports 

Monies deposited with the Town Treasurer from 
fines, lost materials and fees 18,052 

Circulation 352,278 

Reference questions answered 1 1 ,000+ 

Added materials 9,454 

Personnel 

Director: Mary E. Mahoney 

Head of Reference: Nanette Eichell 

Head of Technical Services: Laura Kulik 

Head of Community Services: Katherine Cryan-Hicks 

Head of Circulation: Linda Robinson 

Head of Children's Library: Cheryl Zani 

Maintenance: John Reslow 



67 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 




(Front Row 1-r) Wendy Marcks, Vice Chairman; 
Carl A. Olsson, Chairman; Dr. Richard H. Moser, 
Supt. of Schools 

(Back Row 1-r) Joshua Freidman, Student Rep.; 
Judith B. Mallette; Mary E. Frantz, Secretary; 
Anthony V. Volpe 



68 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Mr. Carl Olsson began the 1994-95 school year as 
Chairman of the Chelmsford School Committee. In 
August of 1994 Mr. Olsson was forced, due to illness, to 
relinquish his responsibilities to Vice Chair Wendy 
Marcks who has served as Acting Chair of the 
Chelmsford School Committee since that time. Mr. 
Olsson and Mrs. Marcks have been supported by Mrs. 
Mary Frantz, Secretary; and Mrs. Judy Mallette and Mr. 
Tony Volpe, Members at Large. Central administration 
for the school department has included Dr. Richard 
Moser, Superintendent of Schools; Dr. Karen Mazza, our 
newly hired Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and 
Instruction; Mr. Robert Cruickshank, Business Manager; 
Mr. Bernie DiNatale, Director of Educational 
Technology. 

The work of the Chelmsford School Committee 
and the Central Office Management Team since January 
1, 1994 has focused primarily on implementation of two 
major components of the Education Reform Law for 
1993; professional recertification and time and learning 
requirements. 

The State Recertification Program requires all 
teaching and administrative professionals to become 
recertified prior to June 18, 1999. Recertification 
includes one hundred and twenty verifiable hours of 
professional development activities. Each school district 
is required to provide a "no cost" option for its 
employees. The School Committee, administration, and 
staff have participated in several hearings and state-wide 
meetings to discuss the development of the program. We 
look forward to completion of a structured program for 
Chelmsford educators, one that meets State requirements 
and supports the professional growth needs of our 
employees. 



69 



In recent months the work of the Time and 
Learning Commission, a special committee organized by 
the Massachusetts Commissioner of Education, has 
resulted in specific mandates by the State Board to 
increase "structured learning time" for Massachusetts 
students. Implications for Chelmsford Schools include 
the possibility of extending the length of the school day, 
the length of the school year, or restructuring time for 
instruction to account for 900 yearly hours for elementary 
school students and 990 yearly hours for secondary school 
students. At the time of this writing the School 
Committee, School Council members, and staff are 
exploring alternatives to meet State mandates. Final 
recommendations are expected by early spring for 
implementation in September of 1995. 

Again at the time of this writing, the School 
Committee is reviewing a school budget for 1995-96 that 
totals $27,109,778. This budget reflects the projected 
revenue available to the School Department for the next 
school year. While the planned budget represents an 
increase of $840,738 beyond appropriated monies for 
1994-95, several reductions in existing grants result in 
fiscal constraints and potential personnel/program 
reductions for next year. 

Student enrollment in the Chelmsford School 
continues to increase as projected. Our schools grew by 
nearly one hundred students at the beginning of the 
1994-95 school year. An additional one hundred students 
are expected for September of 1995. 

Housing provisions for the increase in our student 
population continues to be a problem. Our elementary 
and middle schools are overcrowded, and our high school 
is experiencing minor growth. Central office is targeted 
to vacate Parker School and move its operation to the 
lower floor of the high school. This move will provide 
space for eighth graders at Parker Middle School and the 
completion of our goal of two 5-8 middle schools in the 
district. Center School remains an option for additional 
classroom space at a future date. 



70 



The Chelmsford School Committee has 
appreciated the on-going efforts of parents, staff and 
community members in supporting the educational 
program for our students. We continue to commit to the 
concept that our children are our future. We are proud of 
our schools and look forward to the completion of a 
successful school year. 



71 



FROM THE PRINCIPAL OF 
CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 



DID YOU KNOW THAT: 

1. Amy Boudrow, a junior, has been selected to the 
National All Eastern Chorus, and will perform in 
Rochester, New York March 30th to April 2, 
1995. 

2. Clewis Kinnett and Jenelle Bryan are State 
Swimming Champions in their respective events. 

3. Laura Federico (Field Hockey) and Dana DiFillip 
(Volleyball) have been selected Coaches of the 
Year for 1994. 

4. Chelmsford High School, one of only 20 schools 
in the State, was chosen as a "Words, Not 
Weapons" school through a state grant, with 
extensive peer mediation training to commence in 
January, 1995. 

5. Samuel Beaubien, Andrew Booth, James 
Chamberlain, Paul Druan, Thomas Gibson, 
Charles McMurrer, Michael Moriarty, and 
Michael Yaukoes have made Eagle Scouts; Gold 
Awards have been earned by Nicole Giroux and 
Jeanne Yu, the highest scouting achievement 
possible for this age group. 

6. Public service efforts at CHS continue to help the 
needy in the form of the Santa Fund, the Winter 
Clothing Drive, and the Can Drive. 



72 



7. The following students have been chosen Globe 
All-Scholastics: 



Football - 

Volleyball - 
Swimming - 



Coach Thomas Caito 
Michael Caito 
Daniel Curran 

Jennifer Mumby 

Jenelle Bryan 
Clewis Kinnett 



73 



FROM THE PRINCIPALS OF THE 
CHELMSFORD MIDDLE SCHOOLS 

MCCARTHY MIDDLE SCHOOL 
PARKER MIDDLE SCHOOL 



The middle schools of Chelmsford are schools in 
transition. This school year (1994-1995) the McCarthy 
Middle School has an enrollment of 1,087 students in 
grades five through eight and Parker Middle School has 
an enrollment of 530 students in grades five through 
seven. This is the first year that grade five has been part 
of a middle school. Next school year both schools will 
contain grades five through eight. McCarthy will have an 
enrollment of about 900 students and Parker will have 
close to 800 students. Over the next few years the 
number of students enrolled in each school will become 
closer. Enrollment projects indicate that the number of 
middle school students will continue to increase over at 
least the next four years. 

While the desire to become less like a traditional 
junior high school has been strong, the process, due 
primarily to significant budget constraints, has been slow. 
The administrators and faculty of both schools as well as 
the district's central office administrators share a common 
belief about what a middle school should be like. This 
belief is synthesized from the Carnegie Commission's 
special report, Turning Points and from current literature 
on effective middle schools. Fundamental to this belief is 
a deep understanding of the development challenges of 
early adolescence. Moreover, this belief was reinforced 
by the work of the Middle Schools Council which was an 
ad hoc committee comprised of teachers, parents, and 
administrators. This committee developed a philosophical 
foundation for the organization and operation of our 
middle schools. The committee completed work on 
"belief" and "therefore" statements that reflect the need 



74 



for a nurturing environment for students, a focus on 
instructional teaming, and the development of educational 
opportunities that mirror the development needs of fifth 
through eight grade students. 

Currently, some variation of "teaming" exist in 
grades 5,6 & 7 and the eighth grade remains 
departmentalized. Common planning time exists in grade 
seven. The teaming concept will be implemented at the 
eighth grade in both schools for the 1995-1996 school 
year. 

The McCarthy and the Parker Schools are 
fortunate to have active support from their P.T.O. groups 
and from their individual school councils. This support is 
buttressed by community representatives serving on our 
school councils and by community businesses who have 
been very generous in support of numerous school 
activities and projects. Our teachers and support 
personnel continue to make an enormous commitment to 
the education and well-being of the students of 
Chelmsford. 



75 



FROM THE OFFICE OF 
STUDENT/COMMUNITY SERVICES 



During 1994, the Office of Student/Community 
Services moved from the Parker School to our new 
location, next to the main office at Chelmsford High 
School . Our new phone number is 25 1 - 1 1 66 . 

Student/Community Services continues to oversee 
all students services K-12 as well as Adult Evening 
Programs, Summer School, After-School Enrichment and 
school-aged Child Care. 

Evening School operates fall, winter and spring 
semesters, offering approximately 300 courses to 
Merrimack Valley residents. Summer School classes also 
offer both remedial and enrichment opportunities to 
almost 500 students. Please look for our brochure in 
August and December. 

Child Care programs are available from 7:00 am 
to 6:00 pm for 50 weeks of the year. 

All programs are offered to the public on a self- 
supporting basis. 



76 



FROM THE GUIDANCE DEPARTMENT 

Post Secondary Education Placements 

In 1994, there were 349 graduates. Of those 
graduates, 323 went on to post-secondary education 
which represents 93 % . 

4 year colleges 282 (81%) 
2 year colleges 34 (10%) 
Technical schools /p.g. _7 ( 2%) 

323(93%) 

In terms of non-educational placements, 14 
students elected employment, seven joined the military, 
three students were foreign exchange students, and two 
students were undecided. 

Advanced Placement Program 

In May of 1994, 138 students took 239 Advanced 
Placement Examinations at Chelmsford High School, with 
71% of the grades falling in the 3-5 range. The program 
grades on a five-point college-level scale: 

5 - extremely well qualified 

4 - well qualified 

3 - qualified 

2 - possibly qualified 

1 - no recommendation 

Generally, AP grades of 4 and 5 are comparable 
to college grades of A, and grades 3 and 2 most 
comparable to college grades of B and C, respectively. 
Many colleges will award a third to a full year of 
placement and credit to successful AP candidates. 



77 



Drop Out Rate 

The drop out rate at Chelmsford High School 
continues to be low. During the 1993-94 academic year, 
CHS had a total student enrollment of 1,480. The 
number of drop outs was 22, which represents a drop out 
rate of 1.4%. 

Required to 
Employment Leave Withdraw Total 

Boys 2 20 22 

Scholastic Aptitude Test Scores (SAT) 

Chelmsford High School average scores for the 
Class of 1994 continue to be higher than the average 
Massachusetts and National scores. In the verbal area, 
Chelmsford's average score was 462, which is 36 points 
higher than the State average (426) and 39 points higher 
than the National average (423). 

In the math area, Chelmsford's average score was 
516, which is 41 points higher than the State average 
(475), and 37 points higher than the National average 
(479). 

Service Study and Career Exploration Program 

In the 1993-94 academic year, 79 students 
enrolled in six Service Study and Career Exploration 
programs. 

The Service Study Program is a voluntary elective 
designed to combine practical experience with the 
students' academic studies as they use their free time to 
pursue an area similar to their chosen field. There is an 
opportunity for students to assist our athletic trainer, and 
there are several programs designed for students who are 
interested in working with special needs children. 



78 



The Career Exploration Program gives a unique 
opportunity to all students to supplement their schedule 
and gain insight and experience as they volunteer to assist 
in our offices, library, science lab and television studio. 

Scheduling for these programs is flexible, and the 
electives may be taken for one semester or the entire 
year. All students are placed in their preferred area and 
credits are distributed according to the number of periods 
they work, their performance and attendance. 

Career Center 

The Career Center is a facility utilized by our 
students and members of the community to research 
colleges, occupations, and vocational schools. Part of 
this research is accomplished through the use of 
computers which give available information on colleges 
(two-year through graduate school), occupations, and 
financial aid. For students who do not know what line of 
endeavor they wish to pursue, there is a specific file 
which will give helpful suggestions. In addition, there is 
an infinite variety of research material available. 

College catalogues, applications, and financial aid 
information as well as registration information for the 
S.A.T. I and S.A.T. II tests are housed in the Career 
Center. A VCR is available with a wide assortment of 
150 tapes in our library. 

The Career Center has an outstanding reputation 
and is well-known. Each year we receive several requests 
from representatives of other high schools who wish to 
visit our Career Center and use it as a model for their 
facility. Also, numerous college representatives visit the 
high school as well as speakers from business, industry, 
colleges and business schools. These speakers give 
informative presentations to various classes. Military 
personnel visit for recruiting purposes and scholarship 
information. 



79 



During the school year, our juniors as well as 
various classes are introduced to the Career Center with 
an orientation presentation. 

For students interested in employment, positions 
on a part-time and permanent basis are posted and 
employment counseling is available. 



80 



FROM THE DIRECTOR OF 
DATA PROCESSING 



The School Department has operated its own 
in-house computer service bureau since 1981. During 
this time all major business and student applications have 
been automated on our own computer systems. The 
"workhorse" for this computerization effort has been a 
Digital VAX/750 and a PDP 11/44 minicomputer. 
Microcomputers are also used at each school for 
administrative and academic applications. 

Many of the computer systems used are over 10 
years old. The hardware and software are approaching 
the end of its cost effective life. Older computer 
technologies are more expensive to maintain. The 
development of software and information systems for the 
town and schools must be focused on maximizing the 
value and utility of information while minimizing the cost 
and effort to the user. 

With these objectives in mind, the school and 
town offices have started to implement LAN's (Local 
Area Networks) at each specific location. The complete 
range of distributed and network computing will be 
utilized to develop an in-house electronic highway in each 
local town and school building. Each school building is 
developing its own LAN to tie together administrative and 
academic computer work stations. A Novell network 
would serve as the arena to share relevant school 
information. Each school would have dial out capability 
and connects to Mass Ed On-Line, Internet, and other 
systems throughout the globe. After each building 
implements its own LAN, a WAN (Wide Area Network) 
will be put in place to tie the schools together. In the 
near future, the WAN can be bridged to various other 
networks in town to share relevant data. This is an 
important phase, since our common financial systems are 
inter-related and require redundancy at both the school 
and the town end. 



81 



Other future involvement will revolve around data 
communications and telecommunications. This electronic 
highway promises to bring the town and schools out of 
the "trailing edge computer technology" mode into the 
real computer business world. 



82 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR ENGLISH 
(GRADES 6 - 8) 

During the last year we completed the evaluation 
of the Reading and Language Arts Departments. We are 
currently examining the recommendations of the RELAX 
Committee and making plans to implement the 
recommendations that were made. 

In an effort to integrate the teaching of writing and 
language study more effectively, the seventh and eighth 
grade language arts teachers are piloting three different 
series to be used in their classes. We hope to make a 
selection before June and to have a new series in place for 
September of 1995. 

Again this year, the middle grades competed in the 
WordMaster competitions. While all levels performed 
well, our seventh graders placed second in the nation! 

We were privileged to bring the Chapter 
Repertory Theater to perform for our students. This 
professional touring company performed several short 
stories which had been adapted for the stage. In 
preparation, students had read all of the works to be 
presented and discussed the works themselves and what 
might be expected in a theatrical presentation of them. A 
variety of follow-up activities enriched the presentation. 
The event was funded by Showboat, our student/faculty 
show. 

Several of our students were published in literary 
magazines which feature writing of middle level 
youngsters. In addition, one of our eighth graders placed 
first in an essay contest sponsored by the Elder Services 
of the Merrimack Valley. 

Finally, our sixth graders had several opportunities 
to see several stage productions as part of a series of field 
trips established by the various teams. The trips proved 
very worthwhile in themselves but also because of the 
follow-up activities developed by staff. 



83 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR ENGLISH 
(GRADES 9 - 12) 



In the academic year 1993-1994 Chelmsford High 
School students continued their record of achievement. 
The AP Examination in English Literature and 
Composition is the ultimate testing experience for high 
school English students, challenging them to read poems 
and literary passages analytically and to write critical or 
analytical essays based on these passages. Students are 
scored on a five point scale, ranging from 5 (extremely 
well qualified) to 1 (no recommendation). In 1994 no 
Chelmsford student scored below 3 (qualified) on this 
exam. In fact, the percentage of students taking the 
English Exam and scoring 5 was higher than that of any 
other discipline tested at CHS. Louise Chen was 
recognized for her excellence in critical writing by 
winning the Bard Award. For the second year Victoria 
Groves met success in the Voice of Democracy speech 
writing contest, placing 6th in the local competition but 
leaping into first place in the regional competition. 

Over 200 ninth graders participated in the National 
Language Arts Olympiad, which measurers skills in 
reading, vocabulary, and grammar and allows our 
students the experience of competing with peers 
nationwide attending both public and private schools. 
Fifteen students were recognized for their excellence in 
this contest, including Pranav Anand, John Gates, Arjun 
Mosurkar, Will Woods, Sam Arnold, Rebecca Bromberg, 
Kerry Gardner, Nora Meenaghan, Amanda Wagemaker, 
Christine Baker, Lauren Comeau, Tim Cormier, Erika 
Darling, Paula Lang worthy, and Jeffrey Needles. 

In this year the English faculty has experienced 
some change and not a few accomplishments. 
Department Head Stephen Meidell was chosen to fill the 
position of retiring John Conrad as Dean of Whittier 
House; however, CHS will not be without a Conrad on its 
faculty. Karin Conrad, herself a graduate of Chelmsford 
High School, joined the English Department in 



84 



September. Mary Donovan, a veteran member of the 
English Department, was selected to fill the role of 
department head. The English curriculum grew with the 
introduction of a team taught Humanities course, 
combining English, social studies, and art. 
Demonstrating that English teachers are able to create as 
well as teach literature, teacher Beverly McCoy published 
her first novel, Threads of Silver, Cords of Gold. It is an 
historical novel set in Lowell in the 1880's. 



85 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 
FOR FINE ARTS 
(GRADES K - 12) 

The Fine Arts Department continued to broaden and 
deepen the art and music experiences of Chelmsford students 
in 1993. 

In the music area of the Fine Arts Department, the 
Town-wide String and Choral Festivals drew capacity crowds 
to the McCarthy Middle School Gymnasium in March and 
May to hear students from grades four through twelve display 
their performing abilities as vocalists and orchestral 
musicians. Each school performed concerts for parents, 
relatives and friends in May and in December of 1993. These 
concerts featured bands, choruses, recorder ensembles, string 
orchestra and short musical and dramatic presentations. The 
high school musical in May once again drew "standing room 
only" crowds to the McCarthy Auditorium and the annual 
"Pops" Concert at the Chelmsford Elks Hall was an 
outstanding display of the culmination of the entire year's 
work. 

The annual "Youth Art Month" exhibition at the Page 
Gallery in the Administration Building had student art work 
from grades one through twelve on display for the entire 
month of March. The monthly exhibitions in the gallery 
continued as well. 

Numerous individual art students were honored 
through selection for the Boston Globe Scholastic Art Show, 
and at Art All-State which was sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Art Educators Association. Many music 
students were selected through rigorous audition processes for 
the All-State, Senior and Junior District Festivals sponsored 
by the Massachusetts Music Educators Association. The large 
number of Chelmsford students selected for these prestigious 
events speaks highly of the strength of the arts education 
programs in our schools. Through the Arts students also learn 
self-discipline and cooperation, skills that will transfer to 
whatever vocation they choose to follow after completing their 
formal education. 



86 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

FOR FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

(GRADES 7 - 12) 

At CHS we finished implementation of our new 
Spanish text, Somos Asi (EMC) in level I, and we 
prepared to integrate the new series into Spanish II, 
which was begun in September. The teachers are very 
enthusiastic about this new text series because it is very 
proficiency based and really encourages students to speak 
from the first day. A new French text, Bienvenue 
(Glencoe), was also adopted and implemented in French I 
classes. This text is also very proficiency based, and the 
French teachers, like their Spanish counterparts, are 
extremely positive about using these updated materials. 

The State framework currently being developed as 
part of the Educational Reform Act really emphasizes the 
importance of all students gaining proficiency in at least 
one language other than English. As part of our goal to 
help students become as proficient as possible, we are 
working toward the establishment of a multi-media 
language laboratory at the high school. The facility will 
enhance the opportunities for students to practice using 
the language, and it will enable teachers to better evaluate 
students' speaking skills. 

As of September, the foreign language curriculum 
was expanded to Parker Middle School. Seventy seventh 
grade students began the study of either Spanish or 
French. Next year the curriculum will include eighth 
grade Spanish and French and the FLEX course. A 
change in text was also made in seventh grade French. 
The middle school teachers conferred to select a text 
Discovering French (D.C. Heath) that is not only 
proficiency based, but one that also appeals to the 
students at this level. 



87 



FROM THE CURRICULUM SPECIALIST 

FOR MATHEMATICS 

(GRADES K - 8) 



The nature of Mathematics is one of 
diversification in curriculum and aptitude. It is the 
mission of the Math Department to assist each student in 
achieving his/her individual potential. We have 
incorporated the use of hands-on math manipulatives and 
alternative assessments in the classroom in all grade 
levels. Students have been introduced to open ended and 
open response questions, Many students are keeping 
Math Portfolios. Chelmsford is participating in The New 
Standards Project, a national pilot which focuses on 
raising standards for all students and Mathematics 
Portfolios. Some of the students' portfolios in grades 4 
and 8 will be submitted for state and national review. 

The University of Chicago Mathematics Project, 
Everyday Mathematics, has been fully implemented in 
grades K-3. Teachers in grades 4, 5, & 6 are piloting 
new materials which address the National Council of 
Teachers of Mathematics Standards. 

Our teachers, in addition to teaching regular 
classes, are actively continuing their education in the 
areas of mainstreaming, updating curriculum, and 
researching new programs through the successful 
In-Service Workshop programs. Many teachers are 
attending portfolio training workshops. Teachers also 
attend various conferences including the National Council 
of Teachers of Mathematics Regional Conference, 
conferences using math manipulatives, cooperative 
learning, heterogeneous grouping, integration, and 
alternative assessment. 

With the emphasis on problem solving, we have 
successfully introduced several math competition 
programs at the Middle School level to challenge all 
students. Approximately 1,200 students compete in the 
Continental Math League and New England Math League 



88 



Contests. The success of our program is evident in the 
accomplishments of several students who achieved perfect 
scores and received recognition for their participation in 
Continental Math League and New England Math 
League. Our seventh grade students placed first in the 
New England Math League Competition for 1994. Our 
results in National testing reinforces our belief that our 
goals are achievable and that our methods are productive. 

This year the Robert McCullough Mathematics 
Award was awarded to Tamara Sebeius. 



89 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

FOR MATHEMATICS 

(GRADES 9 - 12) 

The Chelmsford High School Mathematics 
Department continues to incorporate many of the 
recommendations contained in the Standards Published by 
the National Council of teachers of Mathematics into the 
scope and sequence of our curriculum and teaching 
practices. 

All of our teachers have attended workshops and 
seminars on a variety of topics that include: Integration 
of Technology into the mathematics classroom, 
cooperative learning, alternative assessment techniques, 
inclusion, teaching practical mathematics, and the new 
PS AT/SAT. Joseph Ford and John Remalho volunteered 
to serve on Phase One of the K-12 District-wide 
Mathematics Curriculum Review Committee. The 
committee conducted research on current trends and good 
teaching practices and examined our current practices 
through a needs assessment. This group concluded its 
work by submitting a written report of their findings to 
the Superintendent of Schools and the School Committee. 
There were two major textbook adoptions last year, Holt 
Algebra One was adopted for use in our level three 
Algebra One classes and Calculus Reform was adopted 
for use in our Calculus A. P. classes this year. One of the 
contributing authors of this textbook is Andrew Pasquale, 
a member of our department. 

As usual, the Math, Calculus, and Computer 
League teams enjoyed successful seasons. I would like to 
congratulate and commend their coaches, Richard Olson 
and Joseph Ford for all their hard work and dedication. 

On September 1, 1994, Richard McCaffrey retired 
from his position of Mathematics Teacher at Chelmsford 
High School, I would like to thank him for all of his 
thirty-two years of dedicated service to the Town of 
Chelmsford. He will be greatly missed by all of the 
students and staff of the Chelmsford High School. 



90 



FROM THE READING DEPARTMENT HEAD K-12 

LANGUAGE ARTS COORDINATOR K-5 

CHAPTER I DIRECTOR 

The face of reading instruction has changed in 
many ways, yet the desired outcome remains the same. 
We have come to realize that a fully integrated approach 
to reading, one which includes all the language arts - 
reading, writing, listening, speaking, spelling - allows the 
student to make the connections necessary for strong 
comprehension. The goal of the Reading Department is 
joyful literacy for all. 

The school year 1993-1994 was a busy year for 
the Reading Department. , A curriculum review, 
completed in 1992-1993 in grades 7 and 8, resulted in the 
implementation of a new reading program. The focus is 
always on good literature experiences. 

At the same time, grades Kindergarten through six 
underwent the same process of program review. 
Nationally acclaimed experts in reading/language arts 
provided workshops and seminars. Three large groups of 
teachers volunteered to assist in the curriculum review 
process. Initially, a Reading/English/Language Arts 
Review (RELAX) Committee, was formed to investigate 
current research, look at exemplary programs and conduct 
a needs assessment. Approximately twenty-five school 
staff and parents participated, exploring the vast amount 
of information available. Another group of teachers and 
specialists formed a Basal/Anthology Review (BAR) 
Committee to investigate the current best programs to 
meet the criteria established for the reading program. 
Narrowing the choices down to three programs, 
approximately forty teachers at six schools volunteered to 
be pilot teachers for the remainder of the year. This 
culminated in the recommendation for adoption of a fully 
integrated language arts/reading program which was 
implemented in September of 1994. On-going staff 
development is being provided to support the teachers in 
this endeavor. 



91 



We are pleased to be able to offer supportive 
reading services to our students at Chelmsford High 
School. There are a variety of classes and meeting times 
to fit the needs of the students. Again the focus is on 
literacy, but ultimately strengthening the skills and 
strategies that students utilize in reading. 
Comprehension, rate and vocabulary are stressed in the 
context of reading good literature. These activities are 
tailored to fit the student who is learning English as well 
as the college bound student. We have come to realize 
the value of continued instruction and emphasis in reading 
and that this should not stop at the end of the elementary 
grades. Children learn to read by reading and they 
improve their reading skills by reading more and more. 

All Reading Specialists are certified as such. 
Depending on the school, grade level and needs of the 
students, the Specialist can be involved in 'in-class' 
support, 'pull-out' programs, literacy or book discussion 
groups, tutorials, testing, special projects, consulting with 
classroom teachers and the SPED team and conducting 
in-service meetings with their schools. 

We are fortunate to have the ability to offer a full 
menu of assessment to our students. It is the policy of 
the reading department, at all schools, to do pre and post 
testing for all the students in its program. At the 
beginning of the school year testing is administered for a 
large variety of reasons: one, to screen new students to 
assure proper services are being provided; two, at 
classroom teacher's request to assess the need for more 
specific and comprehensive instruction; three, as a 
follow-up within the reading department for previously 
serviced students - both to confirm the need to continue 
services or to reinforce the decision to discontinue 
services; four, for students for whom it is known that an 
upcoming CORE or reevaluation will be taking place; 
five, at parent request. These results are sent home and 
recommendations are made to parents. This fall the 
Chelmsford Public School Reading Department had the 
opportunity to participate in the standardization of the 
Stanford Diagnostic Reading Test (SDRT 4). 



92 



Chapter I continues to face the challenge of a 
decrease in its allotment for the third year in a row. 
Realizing that the demand for supportive services were 
continuing to increase, a decision to alter the ways in 
which these services would be delivered was made. 
Chapter I and the Reading Specialists are working in 
tandem to meet the needs of students in reading. 
Realizing that early intervention is most effective way to 
prevent problems, it is at the early grades that the 
students are targeted. Responding to what research says 
constitutes best educational practices in reading, good 
literature is at the heart of the program via the interactive 
capabilities of CD-ROM. 

Part of the Grant allocation was devoted to the 
acquisition of Computer Technology, and a CD-ROM 
reading program. The services are provided in the 
Chapter I Reading room which is outfitted with five 
Macintosh computer stations. The materials used for 
instruction are diversified, creative, literature based and 
partly delivered through the use of highly interactive 
computer software. Books are sent home as part of the 
daily routine as home school connections are vital. The 
program is highly individualized for the students. Part of 
the instruction time is spent in a small group situation. 

Chapter I tutors, reading specialists and the 
director attempt to provide a team effort incorporating all 
instructional services. The most important objective of 
Project Independence is to insure continuity between 
classroom instruction and Chapter I instruction. 
Conferences with classroom teachers, parents, and 
Chapter I tutors continue to be a top priority. The 
program is primarily a pull-out model, determined by 
student needs and time constraints. 

We can assess, challenge and attempt to strengthen 
student's reading abilities but, in reality, the most 
important gift any of us can give to a student is the love 
and value of reading. 



93 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR SCIENCE 
(GRADES 5 - 8) 



The major goal of the middle school science 
program is to teach the students how to think critically. 
In order to do this, the curriculum is designed to develop 
organization, listening, note-taking, research, 
experimental, logical thinking and problem solving skills. 
Each program involves a hands on approach to develop 
these skills and to accomplish the goal. 

The science program consists of General Science 
in grade five using the new Smithsonian Science and 
Technology For Children Kits on Electric Circuits and 
Ecosystems and a unit in Oceanography. The sixth grade 
General Science program uses the 1991 Macmillan 
Science In Your World science kit and text curriculum. 
Both Life Science, in grade seventh, and Earth Science, 
in grade eight, use the 1991-1994 D.C. Health programs 
which involve hands on activities written by our science 
staff and D.C. Health. 

Many different outside resources are used to 
enrich the science curriculum. Trips are taken to various 
science sites such as the Museum of Science, Plum 
Island, Owascoag Trail, the Whaling Museum and Blue 
Hills Observatory. The science clubs are involved in the 
Merrimack Water Testing program through the University 
of Massachusetts at Lowell and a project called Space 
Station Moon. The PTO has organized assemblies from 
the Museum of Science and other science resources on 
topics such as lasers, the rain forest, electricity and the 
physical sciences. Also, Hewlett-Packard funding has 
provided us with additional updated science audio-visual 
materials. 

During the 1994-1995 academic year, the science 
teachers, in addition to teaching their classes, have been 
involved in training for the STC Kits, graduate courses, 
revising and updating curricula to meet the new 
standards, planning science field experiences, designing 



94 



new lessons and labs and learning to use new technology. 
Also, they have been participating in in-service programs 
and conference/workshops on such topics as middle 
school education, cooperative learning, inclusion, 
heterogeneous grouping, national and state science 
standards, assessment and science curriculum 
development. 



95 



FROM THE CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 
SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

The past year has been a busy one for the high 
school science department's staff. Cheryl Mamalis, 
Marilyn Steele, and Michael Winn spent two weeks of 
their summer in New York State at the Institute for 
Teacher Development Through Ecology. They and their 
students are now able to participate in national research 
projects via America on Line and the Labnet. Also as a 
result of their efforts we are able to utilize the expertise 
of Dr. David Morimoto, an ecologist at Regis College. 

Cheryl Mamalis and Marilyn Steele have also 
spent a week-end, Friday through Sunday night, at 
Merrimack College participating in a microscale 
chemistry workshop. Microscale laboratory exercises are 
less expensive to run and often require less time to 
complete. We have received positive feed back from the 
students when we have run microscale exercises. 

Michael Tate and Anna Swierzbin, Math 
Department, along with four students, spent two weeks at 
the University of Massachusetts at Lowell with the 
(REMS)2, Regional Electronic Magnet School Re: Science 
and Math Program. As a result Ryan Carter, Ahn Ke, 
Philip Yu and Jenna LaRochelle have chosen to 
investigate the condition of the school pond as their 
common project. The students have the use of the 
Internet in order to assist them in their research. 

The department also ran two three day workshops 
during the summer. These workshops addressed the 
honors chemistry curriculum and the subject of 
integrating the PROSOL V software into the physics 
curriculum. Michael Tate, John Mosto, Bruce Ford, 
Andy Sorenson, Frank Turner, and Ralph Sherwood 
participated in one or both of these workshops. 



96 



Thanks to the efforts of John Mosto, we have been 
given a site license for Theorist, a math applications 
program. As a leader of a pilot site John has offered 
workshops and given individual assistance in the use of 
this valuable applications tool. Mr. Mosto has already 
been successful in writing and implementing a lab that 
will be performed jointly by a physics and math class. 

Because of your continued support we are able to 
continue to offer hands on science courses to the students 
of CHS, 96% of whom are enrolled in a science course. 
We thank you for this support and are looking forward to 
another exciting year. 



97 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

FOR SOCIAL STUDIES 

(GRADES 5 - 8) 



The Social Studies Department has had a 
productive year. The fifth grade teachers were a most 
welcome addition and thanks to some good advance 
planning everything progressed relatively smoothly. All 
grades participated in the National Geography Bee and 
again the winner went to the state finals. The department 
sponsored an interdisciplinary school project to celebrate 
Veterans Day. Songs were sung, essays written, medals 
produced, plays written, signs hung on all hall walls 
celebrating the veterans. The eighth grade is preparing 
for teaming next year. The sixth and seventh grade 
teachers completed their curriculum guides. The year has 
been an active one as the teachers have taken part in 
numerous workshops and attended many conferences. 



98 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD 

FOR SOCIAL STUDIES 

(GRADES 9 - 12) 



The Social Studies Department at the High School 
presently consists of thirteen members who offer a broad 
selection of courses. Students may choose from Political 
Science, World History, United States History, Asian 
Studies, Legal Rights, Economics and Consumer 
Economics, International Relations, Psychology, 
Sociology, the Holocaust, American Studies and Modern 
Problems. Also, we offer advanced placement courses in 
American and European History and American 
Government. 

This year the department is focusing on identifying 
and applying technology in the classroom as well as 
running a school-wide News Quiz Competition. The 
department will be studying the new curriculum 
frameworks for Social Studies (mandated by the new 
Education Reform Act) as a first step in revising the 
curriculum to meet the demands of the new state 
assessment tests. 

In September, our former Department Head, W. 
Allen Thomas, was appointed the new dean of Hawthorne 
House. Bernard Battle became Department Head in July, 
1994. 



99 



FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD FOR 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

(GRADES K-12) 



A number of initiatives were begun and/or 
completed over the past year. As a result of a grant 
received by the Chelmsford Police Department, a DARE 
(Drug Awareness Resistance Education) program will be 
provided to all grade five students. Commissioner of 
Education Robert Antonucci participated in a seventh 
grade health education program organized by Mr. Tanner 
(grade seven health educator). He also planned a seventh 
grade parent program focusing on the "Skills for 
Adolescence" curriculum. ■ Eighth grade students 
continued to be certified in CPR as part of their health 
education class. The annual recertification of school 
nurses and physical education staff were also completed. 
Plans for a recertification program for high school 
students is now under discussion. With the cooperation 
of Harvard Community Health Plan and town nurse Judy 
Dunigan, Mr. Finnegan (grade eight health educator) 
arranged an on-site eighth grade cholesterol screening 
program. The high school health and physical education 
staff developed an interdisciplinary wellness unit for ninth 
grade students. A curriculum review will begin shortly 
for the high school health curriculum focusing in on the 
new State Department of Education curriculum 
frameworks. A Physical Education review will begin this 
summer. The high school students participated in Word 
AIDS Day on December 1st with a PWA (person with 
AIDS) speaker. Many students townwide were 
participants in the Chelmsford Community AIDS Task 
Force World AIDS Day program. 

Through the Drug Free Schools and Communities 
and the Comprehensive Health and Human Services 
Grants various programs and services were provided. 
Peer mediation programs were started at CHS and Parker 
with McCarthy to be trained this year. A substance abuse 
counselor and school psychologist were hired for CHS 
with anticipation of similar positions to be added to the 



100 



middle schools as well as the addition of fifth/sixth grade 
health education specialist. Our membership in Project 
Alliance afforded administrators, counselors, nurses, 
teachers, students, and parents an opportunity to 
participate in a variety of health related workshops 
including sexual harassment and violence prevention 
projects. 

Three programs run annually were completed last 
spring—a staff update workshop on HIV/ AIDS, a sixth 
grade parent program on HIV/AIDS/Maturation, and the 
Chaulk Shock program (simulated drunk driving 
accident). 



101 



FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR FOR 

ATHLETICS 

(GRADES 9-12) 



The Chelmsford High School Athletic Department 
during the 1993-1994 school year fielded 29 Varsity 
Programs, 22 Sub- Varsity Programs, and 3 Seasonal 
Trainer Programs. An overall record from 350 Varsity 
Contests was 221-117-12 with 1,147 Athletes, 19 Team 
Managers and 3 Student Trainers involved in the 
program. The Varsity Boys Cross Country, Football, 
Girls Volleyball, Boys Swimming and Softball Teams 
were Merrimack Valley Conference Champions. Boys 
Cross Country were also Northern Area Champions while 
the Majorettes were the State Champions for 1993-94. 



102 



FROM THE FACILITATOR FOR 

PRACTICAL ARTS 

(GRADES 9-12) 

The Practical Arts Department at CHS consists of 
three unique areas: Business Education, Technology 
Education, and Family and Consumer Education. 

In the area of Business Education a number of 
exciting events took place this past year. 

The Business Ed. Department has been extremely 
fortunate to have been the beneficiary of 18 up-dated 
computers and software. These are state of the art, 
hard-disk drive models that are using the 3.1 Windows 
and version 6.0 Microsoft Word Perfect. At the present 
time, this considered by many to be top of the line 
software for high school students going on for future 
education or into the business world. 

In addition, the Distributive Education Clubs of 
America Program distinguish itself at the National 
Competitions once again. 

Sharing a week of marketing excitement, 
education, culture and opportunity through participation 
in the National DECA 48th Career Development 
Conference in Detroit, Michigan and Windsor, Ontario, 
April 23-26; amongst motivated marketing students and 
professionals throughout the United States and Canada 
were 11 Chelmsford High School Students representing 
Massachusetts. 

Overall Chelmsford achieved high honors for the 
State as well as the local DECA Chapter! Once again, 
Chelmsford DECA showcased their competitive and 
winning spirit throughout the Conference! 

Also the Business Education Department and 
DECA Club was involved in other activities this past 
year, including a basketball game for the Doug Hogan 
Memorial Scholarship Fund, the typing contest for the 



103 



Leukemia Fund as part of the Celebration of Learning, 
Annual Fashion Show, and the High School Store run by 
members of the Senior Citizens Center. 

In the Industrial Technology Program the 
Engineering Drawing course has introduced Computer 
Aided Design into the program (CAD). The software 
was donated by Adra Systems, Two Executive Drive, 
Chelmsford, MA. 

This new system will greatly benefit students who 
are planninjg to attend engineering programs as well as 
other beneficial Technical careers. 

In the Family and Consumer Technology Program 
this year the Chefs course continues to emphasize low fat, 
low sugar, high carbohydrate/fiber cooking. A variety of 
breakfast, lunches and dinners using grains, pastas, fresh 
fruits and vegetables as well as protein sources are 
prepared and served two days a week. Techniques, 
safety, nutrition, cost analysis, meal planning, and 
evaluations take place during the other class days. Math 
skills, social sciences, chemistry, as well as reading and 
writing are integrated into the lessons. 

Working in groups, the students learn the value of 
cooperation. Differing roles, assigning tasks, organizing 
materials, are all part of the 42 minute food lab. 



104 



FROM THE ADMINISTRATOR OF 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 



Massachusetts' Chapter 766 and the Federal 
Government's Public Law 94-142, the Education of 
Handicapped Children Act, were enacted to assure that all 
handicapped children have a free and appropriate 
education to be provided by the local community. 

The Special Education Department in Chelmsford 
is responsible for providing effective programs and 
services for children, ages three through twenty-two, who 
are found to have special needs. 

Part of this responsibility is to assure that each 
handicapped student receives an education designed to 
meet his or her unique learning needs and to receive the 
services in the least restrictive environment. 

As of December 1, 1994, the Special Education 
Department had 944 students registered to receive special 
education services, which represents 18 percent of 
Chelmsford's total school enrollment. 

A staff of seventy-three special education 
personnel develop and implement the individual 
educational plans for these students. For those students 
with severe learning and/or emotional needs, Chelmsford 
provides for placement in private day or residential 
schools as approved by the State Department of 
Education. 

The department has developed and implemented a 
Language Based Resource Room Program at the Byam 
School. This program serves language learning disabled 
students who require an intense program. Students from 
other schools in town requiring the services provided by 
this program also attend this class. 



105 



An Occupational Therapy Sensory Integration 
Program has been put in place in all schools for those 
students requiring such a program. To implement this 
program, the Occupational Therapist received specialized 
training along with the purchase of specialized equipment 
for each school. 

The Early Childhood Team has been working with 
our consultant to develop and implement strategies 
designed for PDD/ Autism spectrum students. These 
strategies are also highly effective for other children to 
better prepare them for formal schooling. 

The Chelmsford Special Education Department 
has a budget of $4,392,489 of which $385,015 is 
provided through grants by the federal government. 

The Special Education Department will continue 
its quest to provide effective and cost efficient programs 
and services for the children we serve. 



106 



NASHOBA VALLEY 
TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

The NVTHS District serves the towns of Chelmsford, 
Groton, Littleton, Pepperell, Shirley, Townsend, and 
Westford. 



District School Committee 


Stratos Dukakis 


Chelmsford 


Charla Boles, CHMN 


Groton 


Irene Machemer 


Townsend 


Doug Morin 


Westford 


Samual Poulten 


Chelmsford 


Susan Can- 


Chelmsford 


Robert Union, SEC 


Westford 


Augustine Kish, VCHMN 


Littleton 


Joan O'Brien 


Westford 


Gary Ricard 


Pepperell 


Alternates 




Thomas Carey 


Chelmsford 


Leo Dunn 


Westford 


Harvey Atkins, Jr. 


Littleton 


Stephen Dunbar 


Townsend 


Marcia Melanson 


Groton 


Heidi Shultz 


Shirley 


School Council 


Nancy Antos 


Parent 


Richard Bye 


Parent 


Joseph Goldstein 


Teacher 


William Lekas 


Teacher 


Cindy Martin 


Parent 


David McLaughlin 


Administ. 


Patrick Meile 


Teacher 


Len Olenchak 


Business 


Matthew Ricard 


Student 


Thomas Ryan 


Teacher 


Sharon Shanahan 


Parent 


Barbara Sherritt 


Parent 


Daniel Toombs 


Community 


Andrea Whalen 


Student 



107 



Admini stration 

Fred H. Green Super-Director 

David McLaughlin Assistant Dir/Princ. 

Victor Kiloski Academic Curr. Coord. 

Paula Page Special Needs Coord. 

Ralph Dumas Business Manager 

MISSION STATEMENT 

The mission of Nashoba Valley Technical High 
School is to provide the highest quality academic and 
technical education possible to prepare our students for 
their future success in a technical world. 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School was 
founded in 1965 by the towns of Chelmsford, Groton, 
Littleton, and Westford to provide an opportunity for 
vocational education for the students of this area. The 
school opened in 1969 with nine vocational areas (shops) 
and an enrollment of 255 students. By 1979, the Nashoba 
District expanded to incorporate the three additional towns 
of Shirley, Pepperell, and Townsend. Having outgrown 
the original facility, Nashoba expanded as well, and 
opened in 1980 with an enrollment of 771 students. 

The Nashoba Valley Technical High School enrollment, 
as of October 1, 1994, is as follows: 



Chelmsford 


101 


Groton 


32 


Littleton 


23 


Pepperell 


96 


Shirley 


68 


Townsend 


72 


Westford 


52 


Tuitioned 


39 


School Choice 


36 


TOTAL 


519 



108 



Nashoba Valley Technical High School is accredited by 
the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. 
and provides it students with on-the-job training, saleable 
skills, a co-op program, a high school diploma, a trade 
certificate, an opportunity for further education, and job 
placement. 

Each year, qualified seniors may elect to take 
advantage of our Cooperative Training Program which 
allows senior students to work in industry or business and 
receive valuable training in their chosen fields as well as 
wages. 

The following programs are offered at Nashoba Valley 
Technical High School. 



Technical Programs 

Auto Body Repair Graphic Arts 

Automotive Technology Horticulture/Landscaping 

Carpentry Machine Tool Technology 

Culinary Arts & Baking Medical Occupations 

Data Processing Metal Fabrications & Weld 

Drafting Technology Painting & Decorating 

Electrical Technology Plumbing & Heating 
Electronics 



Freshmen explore all vocational areas before 
making a final vocational selection mid-way through their 
first year. This exploratory program enables students to 
make realistic choices, reflecting their needs, interests 
and abilities. Students who remain in their selected shops 
for their remaining three years at Nashoba Tech and 
complete required core competencies receive a trade 
certificate in addition to their diploma 

Instruction is divided between the vocational and 
academic areas. Students spend alternating weeks in 
academic and vocational classes. The academic areas 
consist of the following: 



109 



Academic Programs 
MATHEMATICS ENGLISH 



Algebra I, II 
Computation I, II 
Plane Geometry 
Applied Math 1,11 
Business Math 
Trigonometry 
Consumer Math 
Special Education 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
HEALTH EDUCATION 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

Civics 
Geography 
U.S. History 1,11 
Entrepreneurship 
Special Education 



Composition I, II, III, IV 
Literature I,II,III,IV 
Tech Prep 

Applied Commun. I, II 
Special Education 

COMPUTER APPS. 

Keyboard Skills 
Computer Basics 
Computer Apps I, II, III 



SCIENCE 

Applied Biology 
Princ. ofTechn. 1,11 
Applied Chemistry 
Environmental Science 
Environmental Science 
Special Education 



SCHOOL TO WORK TRANSITION 

Supportive services are provided for those students 
entering Nashoba Tech with special needs. Remediation is 
also available for those who require learning on a more 
individual basis. 

To qualify for a diploma from Nashoba Valley 
Technical High School all students must complete- 



Four years of: 

English Composition 
English Literature 
Mathematics 
Physical Education 
Vocational Program 



Three Years of: 

Social Studies 
Science 

Two Years of: 

Health Education 
Computer Applications 



110 



Tech Prep 

The Tech Prep program parallels the College Prep 
course of study and presents an alternative to the general 
education program. It prepares students for high skill 
technical occupations and allows either direct entry into the 
workplace after high school graduation or continuation of 
study which leads to an associate degree in a two year 
college. It presents a rigorous body of knowledge in a 
contextual setting and relates it to personal or social 
situations relevant to the workplace. The Tech Prep 
program integrates academic and occupational subjects, 
placing heavy emphasis on articulation from secondary to 
post secondary education. To date, Nashoba Tech has 
articulation agreements with Middlesex Community 
College, Johnson & Wales University, Essex Agricultural 
and Technological Institute, Wentworth Institute of 
Technology, Franklin Institute, Hesser College, and New 
Hampshire College. 

Athletics 

Athletics, as part of the overall high school 
program, includes the following: 



Baseball 


Basketball 


Cheerleading 


Cross Country 


Football 


Golf 


Ice Hockey 


Soccer 


Softball 


Track & Field 


Wrestling 


Weight Training 



Varsity, junior varsity, and some freshmen teams 
are available for students participation. There are NO 
USER FEES required for any sport, thus insuring that cost 
does not exclude any student. Nashoba also has a no cut 
policy giving more students the opportunity to participate. 



Ill 



Nashoba provides an array of extra curricular 
activities in addition to our athletic program. 

Annual Ski Trip Open House 

Class Activities Sr. Trip/Banquet 

Dances Yearbook 

Field Trips Student Council 

Homecoming Student Against Drunk 

Junior/Senior Prom Driving (SADD) 

Mentor Program Student Mentor Prog. 

National Honor Society Student of the Month 

Recognition 
State Outstanding Student Program 
Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA) 

Adult and Comm unity Education 

Nashoba Valley Technical High School's Adult and 
Community Education Program is open to anyone of high 
school age or over. A variety of evening classes in 
technical, academic, and special interest courses are 
offered. This year approximately 1,500 students will have 
enrolled in our Adult Education Programs. 

Originally founded as a vocational education 
facility, Nashoba Valley Technical High School continues 
to provide the residents of the district an opportunity for 
technical training and education advancement. 

Philosophy 

The philosophy of Nashoba Valley Technical High 
School is to provide an educational facility for residents of 
the district, where they will receive occupational training, 
academic education and cultural enrichment which will 
assist them in developing their potential and contribute to 
their becoming productive members of society. 



112 



Our basic objective is to provide an education for 
all students with skills suitable for immediate employment. 
It is the aim of the school that students become self-reliant, 
responsible citizens, having pride in their vocations, 
showing concern for others and an awareness of the world 
in which they live. 

The school provide the students with academic 
skills necessary for success in pursuing continuing and 
higher education. Students are encouraged to enroll in 
courses necessary for success in higher education. 

Our philosophy provides educational opportunities 
for area adults seeking to change their vocation, to upgrade 
skills in their current field, and/or to pursue recreational 
activities. 

Nashoba Tech provides for the individual concerns, 
abilities, and capabilities of all students by using various 
instructional methods, material, and programs. 

Administration, staff, district residents, advisory 
committees, and students are involved both formally and 
informally in identifying the challenges and changes within 
the industrial technology field. 



113 



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114 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Members: 

Ronald Pare', Chairman 

Harold Organ, Jr. , Vice Chairman 

Eileen M. Duffy 

Robert Kydd 

Gustave Fallgren 

Karen Wharton, Alternate 

Leonard Richards, Alternate 

Karen Karpawich, Alternate 

The Board of Appeals for 1994 had a year on par 
with the previous year. Nineteen-ninety-four (1994) saw 
46 applications filed for either Variances or Special 
Permits. The statistics are as follows: 

Total Granted Denied Withdrawn 



Variance 


33 


20 


12 


1 


Special Permit 


13 


10 


1 


2 


Comprehensive 










Permit 















Total 46 30 13 



The Board wishes to express its gratitude to the 
Board of Health, Sign Advisory Committee, Conservation 
Commission, Planning Board and Board of Selectmen for 
their assistance and cooperation. 



115 



CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 



Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 
Steve Chinetti 
James K. Gifford 
David Marderosian 
Jeffrey W. Stallard 

The Celebrations Committee was very active this 
past year coordinating the 1994 Annual Fourth of July 
Celebration. Special thanks to Chelmsford Lodge of Elks 
No. 2310 for funding and organizing the Annual Parade, 
thanks to Chelmsford Lions Club for funding and 
organizing the Annual Country Fair, Chelmsford Art 
Society for the Arts Festival Fair, Chelmsford 
Community Band, and all volunteers from various Town 
Organizations who participated to make the 27th Annual 
Celebration a huge success. 

Special thanks to the many volunteer hours 
provided by members of Chelmsford Auxiliary Police and 
their Explorers Troop. 

We thank the efforts and assistance received from 
Department Heads and personnel of the Police, Fire, 
Highway, Parks and Public Works Department. 

The Celebration Committee is now in the process 
of planning for the 1995 Fourth of July Celebration. 

Respectfully Submitted, 



Walter R. Hedlund, 
Chairman 



116 



COMMISSION ON DISABILITIES 



Ralph Hickey, Chairman 
Paul Logan, Vice Chairman 
Carol Miller, Treasurer 
Cathy Favreau, Secretary 
Sue Brooks 
Matt Caiazza 
Anne Donahue 
Suzanne Donahue 
Mary St. Hilaire 

In 1994 the Chelmsford Commission on 
Disabilities made significant progress towards our long 
term goal of making all of Chelmsford's public buildings 
and private businesses accessible to all its citizens. In 
July the Board of Selectmen approved a policy that states 
that new common victualer licenses will only be granted 
to businesses that are accessible according to the 
Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) legislation. In 
addition, common victualer license renewals will only be 
granted to businesses who meet access parking 
requirements by November 1, 1994 and who are in full 
compliance by the end of next year. 

The town's transition towards universal access can 
only be done if everyone in the community understands 
access and disability issues. Therefore, the Commission 
sponsored several training seminars with the business 
community and with Town departments in 1994. In 
December, Town Manager Bernard F. Lynch, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, appointed Ralph B. 
Hickey, the Commission Chairman, to the position of 
Chelmsford's ADA coordinator. In this position he will 
be able to better monitor and coordinate the town's 
progress in becoming an accessible community. 

In addition, the Commission continued its work 
monitoring access in town. The Commission began 1994 
with 25 on-going access projects in Chelmsford. In 
addition, 23 new access projects were begun in 1994. 



117 



Out of the 48 access projects worked on during 1994, 17 
were closed. The necessary access modifications were 
made. 25 were progressing. Steps have been taken 
toward improving access. More work, however, needs to 
be done. 6 were closed without access modifications. 



118 



COMMUNITY SERVICE COUNCIL 

Members: 

Flavia Cigliano, Resident 

Kit Harbison, Cultural Council 

Kathy Cryan-Hicks, Library 

Cy Locke, Cable Television 

Holly Rice, Recreation 

Jeff Stallard, Historic Commission 

Marty Walsh, Council on Aging 

The Chelmsford Community Service Council was 
formed by the Town Manager, Bernard Lynch to 
coordinate and expand Chelmsford's recreational and 
cultural opportunities. By improving and expanding the 
delivery of these services we hope to enrich the quality of 
life in the Town of Chelmsford as well as increase our 
sense of community. 

The Chelmsford Community Service Council 
recently delivered over 13,000 copies of the Chelmsford 
Community Newsletter to Chelmsford residents. The 
Chelmsford Community Newsletter was designed to 
increase the awareness of the programs and services that 
Chelmsford offers its citizens. These programs may be 
educational, cultural, recreational or all of the above. In 
addition to being a guide for seasonal activities, the 
Chelmsford Community Newsletter will provide 
information about the how and why of town services to 
better understand government operations. 

WinterFest 1995 was also coordinated by the 
Chelmsford Community Service Council. A full slate of 
both indoor and outdoor activities were provided for the 
entire community. Numerous organizations in town 
sponsored specific events at various locations throughout 
Chelmsford. We hope for WinterFest to become an 
annual town event. 

The Chelmsford Community Service Council 
would like to thank all who supported the Community 
Newsletter and WinterFest event. 



119 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Members: 

Lynn LeMaire, Chairperson 
John Smaldone, Vice Chairperson 
Susan Carter 
Christopher Garrahan 
Bob Greenwood 
David McLachlan 

Nineteen-ninety-four' (1994) was a busy year for 
the Conservation Commission, with 41 filings under the 
Wetlands Protection Act and the Wetlands Bylaw. The 
Commission also witnessed further improvements to the 
reservations, as well as a change in staff. 

The primary responsibility of the Conservation 
Commission is enforcement of the Wetlands Protection 
Act, MGL Ch. 131, s. 40, and the Chelmsford Wetlands 
Bylaw, Article XI of the General Bylaws. The 
Conservation Commission received 19 Notice of Intent 
filings for various projects and held public meetings for 
22 Requests for Determination. The Requests tend to be 
either small low impact projects or requests to determine 
if the Commission has jurisdiction over the project. 
Several enforcement orders were also issued for work in 
violation of the Wetlands Protection Act and Bylaw. All 
in all 1994 was similar to 1993 in the number of wetlands 
applications filed. 

The Conservation Commission is also pleased to 
report continuing progress in the management of our 
Reservations. With the help of the Conservation 
Volunteers and Eagle Scout candidates work on Crooked 
Spring Brook Reservation is almost complete. The trails 
have been improved and cleaned up and two foot bridges 
have been installed where the trails cross streams. The 
Commission also added signs at the Thanksgiving Forest 
and, with the help of the Highway Division of the DPW, 
added a parking area at the Cranberry Bog on Elm Street. 



120 



The Commission also said good-bye to Land Use 
Coordinator Jessica Dion. Jessica left to pursue other 
career interests and was replaced by Andrew Sheehan. 
The Commission also had some membership changes this 
year as John Smaldone filled the seat vacated by Dr. 
John Droescher, and Cheryl Deshaies gave up her seat to 
attend law school. 

Finally, the Commission wishes to thank the 
members of the Conservation Volunteers, our Eagle Scout 
candidates and the other Town Boards and Departments 
for their help in the past year. 



121 



COUNCIL ON AGING 



This past year marked an important period of 
growth and positive development for the Council on 
Aging. There were more program offerings, more 
services, and increased participation in all activities. Our 
Senior Center, which celebrated its fifth anniversary, is a 
bustling example of activity where people can come 
together for educational seminars, exercise classes, 
nutritious lunches, and enjoyable socialization. 

Adult Day Program - provided an enriching and caring 
environment for forty (40) participants. This program is 
designed to assist our more frail elders and operates five 
days a week from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 

Elderly Lunch Program - cooked, delivered and served 
over 70,000 meals throughout the year. Our Congregate 
Lunch Program serves an average of 200 people daily and 
our Meals on Wheels delivers close to 100 meals each 
day to shut-ins. 

Friendly Visitor Program - Thirty-two (32) isolated elders 
were matched up with volunteers who visited them for a 
minimum of one hour a week. 

Fuel & Tax Assistance - for 150 residents. 

Outreach - visited thirty (30) shut-ins each week to bring 
community and regional services to bear on their various 
needs. 

Senior Tax Rebate Program - placed twenty-five (25) 
seniors in municipal departments so that they could get a 
five hundred dollar ($500) rebate off their taxes. 

Transportation - provided close to 10,000 trips so that 
seniors could get to hospitals, day care, Center, medical 
appointments and nutritious lunches. 



122 



Respite Care - assisted sixty-five (65) families in 
obtaining companionship and supervisory care for frail 
elders with over 10,811 hours of service. 

Statistics are a means of conveying quick 
information to the general public, but your Senior Center 
is more than a measurement of services. It is a warm and 
caring agency where people feel welcomed, where they 
can share their lives and where they know they will 
receive the best service possible. It is the result of 
dedicated actions by staff and volunteers who work 
diligently and take great pride in making the Chelmsford 
Senior Center an important and valuable component of 
Town government! 

Special mention must also be given to the "Friends 
of the Senior Center, Inc. " who annually contribute over 
$50,000 towards the upkeep of our building and another 
$13,000 for continuation of social service programs. 

Martin Walsh, Director 
William MacDonald, Chairman 
Charles Pechulis, Vice Chairman 
Lilla Eaton, Clerk 

Members: 

Robert Monaco Walter Cleven 

Arlene Leman Howard Mooney 

Eleanor Woodward Claire Norton 

Rose Arakelian Maureen Evans 
Peter Pedula 



123 



CULTURAL COUNCIL 

Members: 

Susan Carmeris 
Edie Copenhaver 
Judy Ficthenbaum 
Pat Fitzpatrick 
Kit TIarbison 
Jean McCaffery 
Joyce McKenzie 
Nancy Vinkels 

Meetings: 

1st Monday of the Month 

Twice a month during Arts Lottery reviews 

The Chelmsford Cultural Council is comprised of 
interested residents appointed to inform the public, 
qualify applicants and dispense funds allocated by the 
Massachusetts Cultural Council (MCC), a state agency. 
The budget of the MCC is determined on an annual basis 
by the state legislature. The Council's primary purpose is 
to regrant state funds for local, community-based 
programs in the arts, humanities and interpretive sciences. 
Grant decisions are subject to final approval by the MCC. 

In 1994, the Council funded 16 grants totalling 
$12,334. Students in the Chelmsford Public Schools 
directly benefited from $1,950, roughly 16% of total 
funds allocated. 

Accomplishments this year: Produced the Performing 
Arts Series. Represented the Cultural Council on the 
Community Service Council and participated in 
publishing premiere issue of "The Chelmsford 
Community Newsletter" as well as planning activities for 
WinterFest '95. Held the second annual Community 
Input Meeting in March. Hosted "Arts on the Common", 
weekly demonstrations by local artists, during July and 
August. In October the Council sponsored a 
well-attended series of classes in Watercolor, Drawing 
and Basket making for adults at the Old Town Hall 



124 



Cultural Center. October was also proclaimed "Cultural 
Month in Chelmsford" by the Board of Selectmen in 
conjunction with state and federal proclamations. A 
successful "Angels for the Arts" Festival and Auction was 
held on December 3. Proceeds will benefit cultural 
programs in Chelmsford. 

The resignations of Eliane Consalvo and Paul 
Gayzagian were regretfully accepted. Appreciation was 
expressed to Karen Leonard who left the Council after 
serving 6 years. 

New member, Nancy Vinkels was welcomed. 

Future projects included: Community Input Meeting on 
March 6, 1995. Continuation of Performing Arts Series. 
Continued representation on Community Service Council. 
Scheduling a grant-writing workshop to assist prospective 
MCC grants applicants in preparing their applications and 
documentation. Sponsoring a series of town-wide 
cultural events during October 1995 titled "Common 
Threads « Celebrating National Cultural Month in 
Chelmsford". Ongoing evaluation of existing 1-3-5 year 
plan as the Cultural Council continues to assess and 
proactively address the cultural needs of the Town's 
residents. 



125 



OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 



Walter R. Hedlund, Emergency Coordinator 
John Abbott 
Walter J. Adley, Jr. 
J. Bradford Cole 
George R. Dixon 

The Chelmsford Emergency Management Agency 
(CEMA) has been active during the year 1994. All 
volunteers meet the first Monday of the month preparing 
various reports for Federal Emergency Management 
Agency (FEMA) and the Massachusetts Emergency 
Management Agency (MEMA). 

The Emergency Management Coordinator and 
members have spent many volunteer hours at FEMA and 
MEMA seminars on Hazardous Materials and Natural 
Disasters. 

The CEMA personnel wish to thank the Town 
Manager, Board of Selectmen, all Department Heads and 
their personnel for their outstanding cooperation received 
by them during the past year. 

Respectfully Submitted, 



Walter R. Hedlund 
Emergency Coordinator 



126 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



Members: 

D wight Hay ward, Chairman 

Hal Matzkin, Vice Chairman 

Bev Koltookian 

Mike McCall 

John Morrison 

Chuck Piper 

Barbara Skaar 

Susan Olsen, Administrative Assistant 

The Finance Committee is composed of seven members 
who are appointed by the Town Moderator, Dennis 
McHugh, to terms of three years each. The Committee is 
the arm of the Town Meeting. As such it's primary 
mission is to study and make recommendations on articles 
that are considered at town meetings. The Committee 
meets every Tuesday and Thursday from January through 
March to hear, analyze, and discuss departmental budgets 
presented by independent boards and various department 
heads. These budgets form the basis of the Town 
Manager's budget which is considered at the April Town 
Meeting. Based on it's deliberations, the committee makes 
a recommendation to the Town Meeting Representatives on 
each budget line item. Throughout the remainder of the 
year, the Committee meets about twice monthly. 

The Committee also meets with petitioners, proponents 
and other interested parties with respect to warrant articles 
that are to be considered at April and October Town 
Meetings. After due deliberation, the Committee makes 
recommendations to the Town Meeting Representatives on 
these articles. 

The Committee communicates with the Town Meeting 
Representatives and other citizens throughout its warrant 
books which are published for the spring and fall Town 
Meetings. In addition to it's recommendations, the 
Committee includes financial data and other useful 



127 



information in it's report. Susan Olsen, Administrative 
Assistant is responsible for the majority of the work in 
preparing this report. 

Each of the members is a liaison to various town 
departments, committees, and boards on all of their budget 
matters. There is also a FinCom member (John Morrison) 
who is represented on the Capital Planning Committee. 

There are periodic joint quarterly meetings with the 
Selectmen, School Committee, Town Manager and 
Superintendent of Schools to discuss financial matters of 
the Town and specific subjects which are of mutual 
concern to all three committees. 

In October, the Committee attended the Annual 
Meeting of the Association of Town Finance Committees 
which is held in Framingham and consists of a range of 
seminars which vary from "Reorganization" to "Education 
Reform" to "Revenue Sources". The 1992 Chelmsford 
Warrant Book was awarded the Best report of medium size 
Towns at this Annual Meeting. 



128 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



Members: 

Susan Gates, Chairman 
Margaret Dunn, Vice Chairman 
Robert LaPorte 
Brenda Lovering 
Stephen Stowell 

John Alden, Alternate 
Bruce Foucar, Alternate 

Mary Caffelle, Clerk 

The H.D.C. functions as a regulatory commission 
for the benefit of the town. A small area of the town's 
center section is under the Commission's authority. The 
objective of the H.D.C. is to provide an expeditious 
application and review process relative to the physical 
modification to the residences and businesses within the 
District. Regular meetings are held on the first Monday 
of each month at the 1802 Schoolhouse. 

During the past year, the H.D.C. accepted 16 
applications for review; held 3 public hearings and 
waived 13 public hearings. Fifteen Certificates of 
Appropriateness were issued and 1 Certificate of 
Non-Applicability was issued. No applications were 
denied. 

Major accomplishments during the past year 
include study of the Commission's standard of review and 
continuation of the photo documentation project and 
publication of the Newsletter, which has achieved 
recognition throughout the state as a model for other 
commissions. 

The members of the Commission wish to thank 
Hal Linnerud for his dedication as both past Chairman 
and member. 



129 



HOLIDAY DECORATING 
COMMITTEE 



Committee Members: 

Donna A. Johnson, Chairman 

Ellen Donovan, Treasurer 

Linda Emerson 

Jean Kydd 

Carolee Hill 

Jacqueline Wenschel 

Carrie Bacon 

Marie Massota 

Nancy Pohlman 

Gloria Schoen 

Karen Ready 

Departmental Mission Statement: 

The Holiday Decorating Committee is a group of 
volunteers who arrange and implement the Holiday 
Lighting and Prelude Ceremony in Chelmsford Center the 
first Sunday in December. The Committee, with the help 
of several interested individuals and groups, physically 
put up and take down all the lights on the shrubs and trees 
on Chelmsford Common, the Old Town Hall and the 
Chelmsford Business District. In addition to the lighting, 
we also organize musical talent who volunteer their time, 
arrange the hayride and assist "Santa" with the 
more than 500 children who come to see him. 

Budget: 

While the Committee is sanctioned by the Town, 
we receive no funds and work from donations given to us 
by several groups and individuals. We hope to continue 
our efforts in the same manner in 1995. 



130 



Goals and Objectives: 

Our goal in 1995 is to expand our program to 
include an additional hayride to be placed in die business 
district. We feel, if we can fund it, that the waiting 
would shortened and more residents could enjoy the 
event. We were able, with the help and cooperation of 
the Police, Fire and Highway Departments, to close the 
Center this year for the few hours of the event and it was 
well received. We hope to do the same in '95 for the 
safety and enjoyment of the crowds. This year was our 
best ever with approximately 1,500 people attending the 
two hour program. We feel very fortunate to have so 
many residents support our efforts and thank all those 
who give so freely of their time and talents to make this 
once a year event possible. 



Respectfully Submitted, 

Donna A. Johnson 
Chairman 



131 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 



The Chelmsford Housing Authority Board of 
Commissioners realized it goal of providing facility based 
respite care in the Town of Chelmsford. Located on 
Groton Road, this new one story, eight bedroom duplex 
opened in December, 1993 and now provides an array of 
services, previously unavailable. 

In mid-November, 1994 the Chelmsford Housing 
Authority Board Commissioners regretfully accepted the 
resignation of Mary Lisa Royce, Executive Director. Ms. 
Royce had served the Authority for over 14 years. Under 
Ms. Royce' s direction, the Authority more than doubled 
its number of elderly housing units and saw the inception 
of family housing in Chelmsford. The funding for state 
and federal rental assistance programs increased 
dramatically during her tenure. 

In late December, 1994 the Authority announced 
the appointment of David J. Hedison as the new 
Executive Director of the Housing Authority. Mr. 
Hedison had worked for the Authority for the past seven 
summers and had recently completed his M.B.A. from 
the Monterey Institute of International Studies. 

The Authority began a renovation project at 34 
Middlesex Street, N. Chelmsford to replace the existing 
roof. Working closely with the Executive Office of 
Community & Development and the Contractor, Titan 
Roof Company from Chicopee, MA the project was 
initiated in December, 1994. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority programs as 
of December 31, 1994 provided a total of 419 units of 
low income housing: 198 elderly, 199 family, and 22 
handicapped. Four of these programs are funded by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts through the Office of 
Communities and Development under Chapter 667, 
Chapter 705, Chapter 689, and the Massachusetts Rental 
Voucher Program. Chelmsford Arms completed in 1974, 



132 



has 56 regular units and 8 handicapped units. The 
Community residence for the mildly to moderately 
retarded was purchased in 1974 and has 6 units. Six, two 
bedroom condominiums in Pickwick Estates were 
purchased in 1981. McFarlin Manor, completed in 1981, 
has 43 regular units, 3 handicapped units, and a four 
bedroom congregate unit which serves the 
semi-independent elderly. Delaney Terrace, f hushed in 
1990, has 48 units, 3 of which are handicapped and a 
one, 4 bedroom congregate unit for the frail elderly. 
These developments are funded under Chapter 667. 
Under the 705 Family Program, 11 units are scattered 
around Chelmsford. The Chapter 689 program is able to 
serve up to 8 individuals in the facility based respite care 
development located on Groton Road. 

The Section 8 Programs are funded by the Federal 
Government through the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development. The Section 8 Existing Housing 
Program presently has 54 certificates under lease in the 
private market throughout Chelmsford and other 
communities and 134 vouchers under the Section 8 
Voucher Program. In late 1994, the Authority was 
awarded 13 new Vouchers for the Family Self-Sufficiency 
Program. Unfortunately, with the future budgetary cut 
backs, the Federal government may not release the funds 
for these new certificates. 

The Chelmsford Housing Authority fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1994 lists assets at $9,184,627.85 and 
liabilities $9,184,627.85 for all programs. All 
developments are inspected annually by maintenance staff 
and administrative staff. The Authority is especially 
grateful to those organizations which express special 
concern for the Chelmsford Housing residents and to the 
Chelmsford Garden Club for their assistance in the 
beautification of the developments every year. 

Members of the staff include David J. Hedison, 
Executive Director, Linda Dalton, Administrative 
Assistant, Nancy Harvey, Leased Housing Coordinator, 



133 



Richard O'Neil, Part-Time Maintenance Laborer, 
Michael Harrington, Full-Time Grounds Keeper and 
Manuel Mendonca, Full-Time Grounds Keeper. 

Regular Meetings are held at McFarlin Manor, 10 
Wilson Street at 7:30 p.m., on the first Tuesday each 
month. The Annual Meeting is the first Tuesday in May. 
All meetings are open to the public. The Chelmsford 
Housing Authority Board of Commissioners would like to 
thank the residents of Chelmsford and Town Officials for 
their continued support and cooperation. 

Respectfully Submitted, 



Ruth K. Delaney, Chairman 
Robert L. Hughes, Vice Chairman 
William P. Keohane, Treasurer 
Lynn M. Marcella, Assistant Treasurer 
Pamela A. Turnbull, State Appointee 



134 



PERSONNEL BOARD 

Members: 

Will Perry, Chairman 
Angela Cosgrove 
Joe Dyer 
James Sousa 
Charles Tewell 

Jeanne Parziale, Personnel Coordinator 

The Personnel Board meets on the second 
Wednesday of each month at the Town Offices. Special 
work sessions are scheduled as necessary. The Board 
consists of five members (four are appointed by the Town 
Manager and one is elected by non-union employes). 
During the past year Peg Fudge, a Board member 
resigned and was replaced by Charles Tewell who works 
in Human Resources at the Digital Corporation. Also 
Jeanne Parziale, Personnel Coordinator replaced Mary 
Casali in October. 

The Personnel Board reviewed and approved an 
anti-smoking policy and an anti-harrassment policy. 
It also developed and proposed an organization promotion 
procedure. The job evaluation plan is nearing 
completion. Most of the job descriptions have been 
reviewed by the employees and their department 
managers. The Board wishes to express its appreciation 
for the cooperation of those who participated in the job 
evaluation process. 

In its role the Personnel Board supports fair and 
equitable personnel practices, which perpetuates 
Chelmsford's reputation for attracting and retaining 
highly skilled and motivated employees. 



Respectfully Submitted, 
Will Perry, Chairman 

135 



PLANNING BOARD 




(Front row 1-r) Christine Gleason-Clerk; James Good- 
Chairman; Thomas Firth, Jr. 

(Back row 1-r) John McCarthy; James Creegan- 
Vice-Chairman; Kim MacKenzie; Eugene Gilet 



136 



PLANNING BOARD 



Committee Members: 

James P. Good, Chairman 

James M. Creegan, Vice-Chairman 

Christine A. Gleason, Clerk 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 

Eugene E. Gilet 

KimL MacKenzie 

John F. McCarthy 

Rayann E. Miethe, Principal Clerk 

During 1994, the Planning Board has experienced 
many changes. Development took a sharp increase, 
especially in the new home' market. One of the new 
concepts the Board was involved with is the Residential 
Cluster Subdivision. This requires the parcel of land to 
be a minimum of ten acres. This concept was designed to 
maintain more of the natural open space land, while still 
allowing some development as required by the 
Massachusetts General Law. It states that each lot is still 
required to have an acceptable 40,000 sq. ft. parcel. Half 
that parcel or at least 20,000 sq. ft. can be the house lot, 
while the remaining parcel is combined with the other 
surplus lots to make up an area that is considered open 
space. It can never be built upon and must remain in it's 
inherent state. 

The Board has experienced a sharp increase in 
construction and development plans and have been 
involved in some controversial and complex issues. 
Working closely with the Town Engineer and the various 
other Town Boards and Commissions, the Planning Board 
carefully considered all factors to reach the best decision 
for the Town and it's residents. While this may not 
always be the most popular decision, it is based upon 
cautious study and much deliberation. 



137 



Also in 1994, the Planning Board appointed Mr. 
James Creegan to head a committee to review the 
effectiveness of our 10 year old Master Plan. That 
committee meets once a month and plans to present a 
report or a recommendation to the Planning Board on the 
effectiveness of the Master Plan. 

The Board is continuing to have success with 
many of last year goals. They are still making progress 
on having the unapproved streets accepted by the Town or 
at least getting the road work to proceed. They are 
monitoring the road bond situation much closer and 
prompting developers to finish their work in a timely 
manner. 

At the reorganization meeting of 1994, the 
Chelmsford Planning Board elected their new officers. 
Mr. James P. Good was chosen to represent the Board at 
the Middlesex Council of Government. Mr. Kim 
MacKenzie continues to represent the Board on the 
Affordable Housing Committee. Mr. James M. Creegan 
represents the Board on the Traffic and Safety 
Committee. Unfortunately, in November, Ms. Christine 
A. Gleason resigned her position on the Board to move to 
Seattle, Washington to be married. Ms. Gleason was a 
member of the Board since April of 1988. Before that, 
she had served as Assistant to the Planning Board for five 
years. We will all miss her and wish her much luck in 
her future endeavors. On December 5, 1994, the 
Planning Board and the Board of Selectmen, jointly 
appointed Ms. Tracey Wallace Cody to fill the vacant seat 
until the next election in April, 1995. Ms. Cody will be 
a positive asset to the Board because of her experience as 
a Real Estate Lawyer and her lifelong residency in 
Chelmsford. Mr. Eugene E. Gilet was then appointed to 
perform the duties of Clerk for the Board. 

The Planning Board office is open to the public 
now on a full-time basis with office hours 8:30 AM to 
4:30 PM daily. 



138 



When the Planning Board function was created by 
the Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 70, 
its function was to oversee the development of the Town. 
They are also responsible for a careful study of the Town 
resources, keeping in mind the needs and conditions 
required to maintain the health and welfare of the 
citizenship. The Board's primary function is the approval 
of any construction plans for the development of the 
town, both residential an commercial. The Board must 
strictly comply with all Zoning Regulations, Town 
By-Laws, Town Rules and Regulations and any State 
Laws and Mandates. Additional functions include, but 
are not limited to, the subdividing of property, reviewing 
any proposed changes to the Town's regulations and 
by-laws through a public hearing process. The Board is 
responsible for recommendations and reports to Town 
Meeting and producing an official town map. 

A total of twenty-nine (29) meetings and six site 
walks were held. At these meetings, the Board held 
twenty-nine (29) public hearings. Four of these were 
rezoning of land or by-law change issues. The remaining 
twenty-five (25) hearings resulted in thirteen (13) 
subdivisions approved, four (4) preliminary subdivisions 
processed, and eight (8) site plans approved. In addition, 
the Board approved twenty-eight (28) Form A 
Subdivision Control Law Not Required Plans. 



139 



RECREATION COMMISSION 



Members: 

Robert Hayes, Chairman 
Michael Ablove, Vice-Chairman 
Harry Ayotte 
Robert Charpentier 
Paul Murphy 

Holly Rice, Recreation Coordinator 

Like all Town Departments, Recreation again was 
challenged by the budget crunch. Our goal to maintain 
our recreation programs on a self-supporting basis in 
1994 was realized. 

The Commission hired a very competent staff for 
the 1994 Summer season, with Dan Johnson as the 
Summer Director. Dan supervises an excellent program 
servicing children of all ages. 

Registrations for our summer programs were 
slightly higher than 1993, and enabled the summer 
program to remain self-supporting. The only area which 
is not self-supporting is the free swim at Freeman Lake. 
It is necessary to have two lifeguards present seven days a 
week throughout the summer season. 

Our summer program included swimming lessons, 
a water adjustment program for three and four year olds, 
tennis lessons, track and field, basketball, baseball, and 
volleyball camps, and a very successful day camp 
program at Varney park. Recreation again sponsored 
several other not-for-profit sports camps, including field 
hockey, wrestling, football, girl's basketball, youth and 
high school age soccer. 



140 



Registration for all of our summer programs can 
be done at our Annual Activities Fair, held in June. The 
cost of the Activities Fair is absorbed by a grant from 
CADAC (Community Alcohol and Drug Awareness 
Committee). 

The Fourth of July Pre-Parade Race was another 
successful project for 1994. Thanks to continued 
financial support from Sully's Ice Cream, personnel 
supplied by The Courthouse, and help from local runners 
we were able to preserve a long standing Chelmsford 
tradition. 

Our workreation volunteer program was again 
implemented in 1994 and was very helpful. These young 
volunteers helped with beach maintenance, and also 
helped with children in the day camp and many of the 
other summer programs. They did an exceptional job and 
should be commended for their dedication. 

In 1994 the Recreation Department offered several 
new programs during the Winter, Spring, and Fall 
seasons. Some of the successful programs organized for 
the Winter season include the Nutcracker, the Nashoba 
Valley Ski Program, and the New England Patriots. 

The successful programs organized for the Spring 
season include Forever Plaid and the Boston Red Sox. 

The 1994 Fall season was a great success for the 
Recreation Department. The programs planned during 
this past Fall include the baby-sitting course, CPR course, 
Fall Foliage Tour, Santa is Calling, Newport Mansions, 
and the very successful New York City Shopping Trip. 
Several additional programs were planned and proved 
very successful. 

New Commission member Harry Ayotte was 
welcomed. The resignations of Evelyn Newman, Ron 
Zylich, and Jeff Stallard were regretfully accepted. 



141 



The Recreation Department will continue to 
develop programming in response to the growing and 
changing needs of all populations within the Town of 
Chelmsford. Programs organized by the Recreation 
Department will be advertised in the Chelmsford 
Community Newsletter which will be delivered three 
times per year during the months of January, May and 
September. 

The Recreation Commission would like to thank 
all who helped to make 1994 a success. 



142 



SEWER COMMISSION 





(Front row 1-r) Evelyn Newman; John Emerson, 
Chairman 

(Back row 1-r) Barry Balan, Vice Chairman; George 
Abely, Clerk; Richard Day; Thomas Moran 



143 



SEWER COMMISSION 



1994 marked the commencement of construction 
in Phase 3 of the Chelmsford Sewer Project as identified 
in the 1984 Facilities Plan. Phase 3 is the largest phase 
and includes: 

- TheWestlands 

- Freeman Lake Area 

- Westford Street Area 

- North Road Area 

- East Chelmsford; and 

- Heart Pond 

Sewer installation began in the Westlands in April 
of 1994. We experienced a productive construction 
season. We hope to have sewer service available to most 
of the Westlands in the Spring of 1995. 

To date, the Chelmsford Sewer Project has: 

- Installed over 73 miles of main line sewer; 

- Built 14 pump stations; and 

- Serviced 5,616 homes and businesses (50% of the 

town). 

While the Commission is pleased with the overall 
progress of the project, we still remain focused on 
controlling costs. We are pleased to report that the sewer 
project to date, in excess of $45,000,000 of construction, 
has remained within budget. We continue to concentrate 
on maximizing available federal and state financial 
assistance. 

This past year, we worked diligently with the 
town's finance director to develop an overall plan to 
control the impact of the sewer debt on the tax rate. This 
year we implemented a plan whereby we elongated our 
schedule to better utilize the flexibility of short term debt, 



144 



while simultaneously spreading the long term debt more 
thinly over the life of the project. We believe this 
strategy will further reduce the burden of the sewer 
project on the tax rate, without increasing costs. 

In 1994, Town Meeting authorized an extension of 
the life of the Sewer Commission beyond the year 2005. 
The main purpose of this extension was to allow the 
Commission to look more closely at the remaining 3,700 
homes not originally earmarked by the 1984 Facilities 
Plan for municipal sewerage. We need to begin this 
process because of the pending changes to the State 
Sanitary Code (Title 5), which are scheduled to go into 
effect on April 1, 1995. We are most concerned about 
the ramifications for those homeowners who will not be 
able to repair their septic systems to meet the new code 
because of existing limitations on their property. 

Also in 1994, we moved closer to a final 
agreement with the Town of Tyngsborough which will 
open an intermunicipal sewer connection at the 
Tyngsborough/Chelmsford line. The North Chelmsford 
system was designed and constructed in anticipation of 
this Tyngsborough connection. This agreement will mean 
that Tyngsborough will commence payments to 
Chelmsford for Tyngsborough 's share of the downstream 
collection and treatment facilities. In 1994, the 

Commission continued negotiations with developers and 
commercial property owners in the Drum Hill Area to 
extend municipal sewerage to the area. In the summer of 
1994, we developed a carefully conceived plan whereby 
all costs will be shared among the commercial property 
owners in the area, and whereby none of the costs will be 
passed along to the residents of Chelmsford. 



145 



The Commission would like to acknowledge our 
support staff, Evelyn Newman, Jacqueline Sheehy, and 
Gail Loiselle, for their hard work, professionalism and 
patience. Their multifaceted duties are shared by the 
Sewer Division of the Department of Public Works, and 
they are the individuals who interface with the public on a 
daily basis. 



Respectfully submitted, 



CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 



John P. Emerson, Jr. , Chairman 
Barry B. Balan, Vice Chairman 
George F. Abely, Clerk 
Richard J. Day 
Thomas E. Moran 



146 



SOLID WASTE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Members: 

Norman Eisenmann, Chairperson 

Barbara Scavezze, Solid Waste Coordinator 

Allen Beebe 

Catherine Brown (FY94) 

Henry Emmet (FY95) 

Elizabeth Mattson (FY95) 

Robert McCallum 

The Town of Chelmsford contracted for the following 
services for residents, funded by taxes: 

Solid Waste Collection 

Recycling Collection 

biweekly curbside collection for residents 
with curbside solid waste collection 

central drop-off within complexes which 
have dumpsters for solid waste 

Curbside leaf collections, one in spring, two in 
fall 

Yard waste drop-off at Laughton's Nursery in 
Westford, (discontinued July 1) 

Brush drop-off held at Highway Yard, once in fall 

The major accomplishments of the SWAC and Solid 
Waste Coordinator during the past year include: 

Prepared bid specifications for the collection and 
disposal of solid waste, and the collection and 
marketing of recyclables, for contracts to begin 
July 1, 1995. 

Produced and mailed an informational flyer to all 
residents communicating the proper methods, 



147 



timing, and places for disposal of various types of 
recyclable material and solid waste. Also 
prepared this type of information for inclusion in 
the new Community Newsletter. 

Maintained our on-going emphasis on recycling 
and solid waste reduction programs through our 
weekly column in the Chelmsford Independent, 
periodic informational announcements on Cable 
43, and participation in 4th of July activities. 

Continued to staff (along with other volunteers) 
the bimonthly Polystyrene drop-off, which 
expanded beginning in July to include plastics (#1) 
(PETE), #3 (PVC), and #5 (PP), as well as office 
paper, magazines, catalogues, corrugated 
cardboard, chipboard (e.g. cereal boxes) and 
phone books. 

The SWAC goals for the next year include: 

Implement the new 5-year contract for the 
collection and disposal of solid waste, and the 
collection and marketing of recyclables. 

Issue bid specifications to explore a long term 
disposal contract. 

Institute a drop-off for metal items to be recycled 
and furniture and other household goods to be 
reused. 

Increase participation in the recycling program to 
reduce trash disposal costs. 

Continue to keep residents informed of solid waste 
and recycling issues through weekly activities, 
Cable 43 announcements, informational flyers, 
and participation in 4th of July activities. 



148 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and 
residents of the Town of Chelmsford, the annual report of 
activities of the Department of Veterans' Services is 
submitted. 

Chapter 115 of the General Laws of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts provides for mandated 
services and benefits to veterans and their dependents. 
The District Office of the Department of Veterans' 
Services serves the towns of Chelmsford and Westford. 

For FY1994, $101,734 was expended on financial 
and medical assistance to eligible needy veterans, as 
authorized by the State Office of the Commissioner of 
Veterans' Services. Seventy-five percent (75%) of that 
amount is reimbursed to the town by the Commonwealth. 
43 (forty-three) cases were administered benefits through 
this state-mandated program, average 12-20 (twelve to 
twenty) open cases per month. 

As the Veterans Service Officer, federal benefits 
and programs have been administered through the U.S. 
Department of Veterans' Affairs (V.A.). Claims for 
compensation, pensions, medical care, home loans and 
education benefits have accounted for an increase in 
federal benefits cases. In FY94, 25 (twenty-five) claims 
for federal benefits were filed resulting in awards totally 
$7,507.00. 

The District Offices of Veterans' Services 
relocated to Old Town Hall, Chelmsford Center, to better 
accommodate the veterans of both towns in the District, 
Chelmsford and Westford. The Town of Westford shares 
40% (forty percent) of the operating costs of the District 
Office. An unpaid Veterans District Advisory Board 
represents the veterans of the towns. 



149 



In addition to providing assistance to needy 
veterans, Veterans' Services include burial assistance, 
referrals to jobs programs, housing, food and fuel 
assistance. The Director participates with the 

Massachusetts and Middlesex County Veterans Service 
Agents Association, serves as liaison to the Chelmsford- 
Westford Veterans Council, and has been appointed to the 
Commissioner's Housing Advisory Board and the Greater 
Lowell Alzheimer's Association Board of Directors. 

The Department of Veterans' Services has been 
greatly assisted by the membership of the American 
Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, Disable American 
Veterans, and Merrimack Valley Vietnam Veterans of the 
town, and staff and members of the Chelmsford Senior 
Center, the Chelmsford Veterans Memorial Park 
Committee, and the Chelmsford Community Exchange. 

A major goal of 1995 will be to expand the 
availability and access to health care for the town's 
veterans, especially geriatric services to our growing 
elderly veterans population. Outreach to veterans 
suffering from Persian Gulf Syndrome and Agent Orange 
will continue to be of concern. 

The Board of Selectmen and the Town Manager 
have been very supportive of these endeavors and we 
thank you for your efforts of the town's veterans. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

William L. Hahn 

Director 

Department of Veterans' Services 



150 



DISTRICT ADVISORY BOARD 

CHELMSFORD-WESTFORD 
VETERANS' SERVICES 



1995-1996 



Chelmsford 
Harry Silveria 
Paul Douglas 
Anne Jensen 
Arthur Santry 
Walter Hedlund 
Richard Saladino 
Al Sherburne 
Claire Norton 



Westford 
Brian Vaughn 
Wilbert Vaughn 
Roderick Maclellan 
Michael O'Connor 
John Holmes 
Betty Hook 
Jeff Dean 



151 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 
COMMITTEE 



During the year of 1994 the committee did not 
receive any applications for assistance from Veterans of 
World War II. 

Applications for assistance usually come from the 
Veterans' Agent of the Veterans' Benefits Department. 

When assistance is granted it is in the form of material 
grants. No cash payments have been made in the past. 

The fund was established during 1947 and since that 
time many Veterans of World War II have been helped. 
In two more years the Fund will have been in operation 
for fifty years. 

During 1994 a total of $663.24 in interest income was 
received. The fund total has now reached $19,220.29. 

One of our committee members passed away during 
1994. Mr. Robert T. Clough had served as a member for 
quite a long period of time. We do want to acknowledge 
his past willingness to serve. 

Present members; one from each voting precinct, are 
listed as follows: 



PRECINCT: 


1 


Steven E.C. Belkakis, DDS 


2 


Carl Lebedzinski 


3 


James J. Walker 


4 
5 
6 


John J. McNulty 
George F. Waite 
Alfred H. Coburn 


7 
8 
9 


Alan E. Greenhalgh 
Neal C. Stanley 
Lloyd C. Greene, Jr. 



152 



The Committee extends their appreciation to the various 
town officials who have assisted the Committee in the 
past. 

Respectfully Submitted, 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE 

Alfred H. Coburn 
Chairman 



153 



VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 

Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 
and the Town Manager 



January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1994 $18,557.05 

Balance on Hand as of 1/1A1994: 
Add Receipts: 

The MassBank for Savings, Reading MA 
Interest $424.11 

The MassBank for Savings, Reading MA 
Interest $239.13 



Total Interest Received: $663.24 



Balance on Hand as of 12/31/1994: $19,220.29 

ASSETS 

MassBank for Savings, Acct. #911287909 $13,265.12 
MassBank for Savings, Acct. #2055696 $5,995.17 

TotalAssets $19,220.29 

LIABILITIES 

Total Liabilities $ None 



Total Assets, less Liabilities, as of 
December 31, 1994 $19,220.29 



Respectfully Sumitted: 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 

VETERANS ' EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE 

Alfred H. Coburn, Treasurer 

154 



WARRANT FOR ANNUAL 
TOWN ELECTION APRIL 5, 1994 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 
VIZ: 

Precinct 1: 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 

Precinct 2: 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 

Precinct 3: 

Harrington Elementary School Gymnasium 

Precinct 4: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 

Precinct 5: 

Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6: 

Westlands School Cafetorium 

Precinct 7: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 

Precinct 8: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium 

Precinct 9: 

Town Office Building Gymnasium 



155 



On Tuesday, the 5th of April, 1994 being the first 
Tuesday in said month at 10:00 a.m. until 8:00 p.m. for 
the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes for the following officers: 

Two Selectmen for three years; 

One School Committee Member for three years; 

Two Members of Public Library Trustees for three 
years; 

One Member of Board of Health for three years; 

One Member of Board of Health for an unexpired 
two year term; 

Three Planning Board Members for three years; 

One Sewer Commissioner for three years; 

One Cemetery Commissioner for three year. 

and to vote on the following question: 

QUESTION 1 

Shall the Town approve the Charter Amendment proposed 
by the April 26, 1993 Annual Town Meeting summarized 
below? 

Yes 

No 



Summary: If adopted the proposed amendment would 
provide an appeal procedure in the event that a Town 
Meeting fails to attend more than one-half of the Town 
Meeting Sessions held in a calendar year. The text of the 
proposed amendment appeared under Article 11 of the 
April 26, 1993 Annual Town Meeting and was unani- 
mously approved by the Town Meeting Representatives. 



156 



and to bring in their votes for the following: 

Fifty-four Representative Town Meeting members; 
six representatives per precinct for a three year term. 

One representative Town Meeting Member for an 
unexpired two year term in Precinct 5. 

One representative Town Meeting Member for an 
unexpired two year term in Precinct 9. 

The polls will be open from 10:00 a.m. until 8:00 
p.m.; and to meet in the Senior Center, Groton Road 
North Chelmsford, on Monday, the twenty-fifth day of 
April, at 7:30 p.m. in the evening, then and there to act 
upon the following articles, VIZ: 

For complete warrant information see original 
documents on file in the Town Clerk's Office. 



157 



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161 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 25, 1994 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the 
Senior Center by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh at 
7:40 PM, who recognized the presence of a quorum. 
There were 152 Town Meeting Representatives present. 
He went over the various procedures and pointed out the 
fire exits. 

The Moderator then asked for a moment of silence in 
honor of Arthur Bennett, Charles Marderosian, Elizabeth 
Ferreira. These individuals had served the Town in 
various capacities, and had passed away since the October 
meeting. 

Friday, April 29th is Student Government Day at the 
High School. The Moderator explained that the Students 
were in attendance at this meeting and that he would read 
the individual names and offices and when he was done 
reading the Students are to rise in order to have the Town 
Meeting acknowledge them. The Students are as follows: 



State Representative 
Selectmen 



Board of Health 

Police Chief 
Ass't Police Chief 



Mike Costa 

Louie Distasi 
Kerry Ducharme 
Gregory Mara 
Julie McCusker 
Ben Roberts 

Matthew Metivier 
Tricia Metz 
Jennifer Pattison 

Kiat McLaughlin 

Eric Dishman 



162 



School Committee 



State Senator 
Town Manager 
Treasurer/Tax Collector 
Finance Committee 

Supt. of Schools 
Housing Authority 

Council on Aging Director 
DPW/Town Engineer 
Planning Board 

Building Inspector 
Veteran's Agent 
Cemetery Commission 

Town Clerk 
Constable 



Christina Eagan 
Jill Molony 
Erik Olsson 
Kater Petersen 
April Watts 

Andrea Hamwey 

Eric Horndahl 

Ellen McCabe 

Matt Amerson 
Rebecca Deer 
Lynn Hyatt 
Peter Kalpas 

Danielle Demers 

Scott Richard 
Steve Rigazio 
Aaron Robinson 

Christina Tsandikos 

Marti Fonbing 

Jeremy Davis 
Tony Silvia 
Jeff Thompson 

Michael Gavin 

Ali Bisset 

Adam De Young 
Sue Emanouil 
Tammy Rager 

Theresa Daly 

Brendan Ahern 



163 



Board of Assessors Adriano Agostino 

Donata Jerome 
Chris Parke 

Supt. of Streets Charles Hillman 

Wiring Inspector James Rines 

Supt. of Public Bldgs. William Allen 

Library Trustee Rebecca Morse 

Sewer Commission Matthew Caffelle 

Chrissi Crow 
Chad McMurrer 

The Town Meeting Body proceeded to give the 
students a round of applause. 

The Moderator asked permission from the Body to 
allow the following non-residents to speak from time to 
time. These individuals have information concerning 
certain articles which may be necessary to hear. Ken 
DiNisco from DiNisco, Kretsch and Associates an 
architect for the Center School article. Bernie DiNatalie 
Director of Technology and Adam Wasylyshyn, Director 
of Data Processing, may speak on any school articles. 
Robert A. Goober, Project Manager from Weston and 
Sampson Engineering, may speak on any Sewer articles. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

Selectman Robert P. Joyce moved to waive the 
reading of the Constable's return of service and the 
posting of the warrant be waived. Motion carried, 
unanimously, by a show of hands. Selectman Joyce 
moved to waive the reading of the warrant. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 



164 



UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Robert P. Joyce 
moved to hear reports of the Town Officers and 
Committees. Chairman of the Board of Selectman Roger 
Blomgren explained that this has been done at past 
meetings, The State Senator and State Representative 
have been invited by the Board of Selectmen to come to 
the Annual Town Meeting and report on the activities that 
occurred during the year. State Senator Lucile Hicks 
came forward and gave a report of the various bills that 
have passed or are pending. The money raised from the 
revenue taxes on cigarettes and the child support reform 
bill are areas that have benefited Chelmsford greatly. She 
also explained that the local aid deadline of June 1, 1994, 
for any state funding concerning the 64% reimbursement 
from the state for renovations of an Education Facility, 
has been extended to 1995. . Selectmen Blomgren 
announced that State Representative Carol Cleven was 
unable to be at the meeting tonight due to sickness. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Town Manager Bernard L. 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to transfer and 
appropriate from available funds the sum of $300,000.00 
for the purpose of funding Line Item 29 Undistributed 
Expenses - Employee Benefits of the 1994 Fiscal Year 
Budget. 

Bernard Lynch explained that this article concerns the 
employees health insurance. He had estimated a lower 
amount when planning the previous budget, this amount 
was needed to fund the cost, it would come from free 
cash. He made a presentation which showed the amounts 
paid by the various surrounding towns for their 
employees. Questions were asked concerning the 
increased cost. The Town Manger explained that there are 
more retirees this year, plus the early retirement program 
of last year. Also due to the economic constants, many 
spouses of Town Employees were laid off or retired. As 
a result more Town Employees take advantage of being 
under the Town's plan, either as a single or family 
member. The Moderator asked for the Finance 
Committee's recommendation. Chairman Dwight 

Hayward, said that the Finance Committee recommended 



165 



the article. Chairman Roger Blomgren said that the 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Town Manager Bernard L. 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to borrow the sum of 
$6,093,399 for the purpose of renovating the Center 
School for use as an Educational Facility contingent upon 
approval of state funding to reimburse the Town 64% of 
the principal and interest expended on the renovation. 

Bernard Lynch explained that due to this being a 
municipal building it is necessary for him to bring this 
article forward. The School Department has and will 
make a extended presentation stating the purpose of the 
article. Dr Richard Moser, Superintendent of Schools 
came forward and proceeded to explain the article. On 
his statement of need he showed statistics reflecting the 
present enrollment and predictions of future up to the 
year 1999. According to predictions it is expected that 
6,148 students will be enrolled through out the system. 
He gave information showing the present building 
capacity for all the schools, which included the various 
capacity for the Parker, McCarthy and High School. He 
explained the figures shown in the cost of the Center 
School renovating and listed the items that were not 
considered in the original study done in 1993, which said 
that the cost would have been $841,400. -now the 1994 
study reflects the cost of $6,108,399. a difference of 
$5,266,999. 

Dr Moser then asked Ken DiNisco, Architect for the 
firm who has prepared the renovation plans of the school 
to address the body. He explained that the school was 
built in 1955 with twenty four classrooms, administration 
area, bathrooms, teacher's area, health area, cafeteria, on 
lower level. The two story portion consisted of a kitchen, 
cafeteria facing the rear. Since 1981 the building has 
been modified to fit the various needs of the Wang Child 
Care, and the present Lighthouse Private School which 
have occupied the premises. In order to return to the 



166 



public school building from a private school building 
structural changes will have to be made through out the 
building. Classrooms have been made smaller and will 
have to be returned to the original size. A 6,000 square 
foot addition will be constructed to the already well 
constructed 50,000 square foot size building. This would 
hold the additional classrooms that were not required in 
1955. Music rooms, computer rooms, etc. This would 
house an elevator, thus making the building completely 
handicap accessible. An expanded parking area will be 
made. He showed a presentation which reflected the 
costs of the project. The state would be paying 64% or 
$3,899,775. The Town's portion or 36% would be 
$2,193,623. paid. Construction would begin in 1998. If 
this is not applied for by June 1st then there would be no 
guarantee of any state reimbursement. 

School Committee member, Judy Mallette went over 
the restrictions involved. June 1, 1994 is the actual 
deadline for making application in order to receive 64% 
reimbursement. August 30, 1994 notification from 
Department of Education approval. June of 1998 begin 
construction. Building a new school is not an option. The 
State will not fund any other type of reimbursement for 
any other building because the Center School is owned by 
the Town. Also the State requires a fifteen acre site for 
any new school, which, the Town does not have. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained the Bonding 
process. The project would require two bonds. One 
which would be paid for in five years. This would be for 
the architect fees and services that must be paid at the 
beginning of the project in the amount of $350,000. And 
another for the construction costs of $5,750,000., which 
would be paid off in ten years. This is an affordable 
project. The impact on the tax rate for the first year of 
the construction bond would represent roughly 20 cents 
on the tax rate. The architectural bond would be just 
under 2 cents on the tax rate. The ten year time frame 



167 



was chosen even though it is a rapid payment plan, in 
order to maintain the present high bond rating. It is 
estimated that the interest rate will be 6% which is a 
reasonable and conservative figure. 

Numerous questions were asked, and a lengthy 
discussion took place. Judy Mallette again stated that in 
order to be guaranteed a definite 64% reimbursement 
which would include the principal and interest it must be 
done by June 1st. If done after that date then the state 
won't act on the application until 1996, at which time a 
new schedule will be issued for reimbursement at an 
unknown percentage rate. If not done and property is 
sold off, the Town must wait ten years for any type of 
reimbursement for any new or old construction or 
additions. Janet Dubner questioned who maintained the 
building now? Bernard Lynch explained that because it is 
leased through the Town, the Town maintains the 
property. Why was there a difference in the two reports. 
Due to the different requirements being met. The State 
was being more restrictive on the requirements. Sam 
Poulten questioned the lease terms. It was his 
understanding that while the building was being leased 
any renovations had to be temporary because at the end of 
the lease it had to be returned to the original state. 
Bernard Lynch said that as far as he knew this was not in 
the terms. More discussion took place. The Moderator 
asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. 
Chairman Dwight Hayward said that the Finance 
Committee fully recommended the article. Selectman 
Roger Blomgren said that a majority of the Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the article. Jeff Stallard 
requested that the Selectmen poll their votes. Selectmen 
Brem, Lawlor and Joyce were in favor of the article. 
Selectmen Blomgren and Dalton were against the article. 
Robert Hall spoke against the article. Carl Olsson, 
Chairman of the School Committee said that the Board 
has many restrictions due to proposition 2 1/2 and the 
School Mandate bill. More discussion took place. 
Bradford Emerson moved the question. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried. The 
Moderator then asked for a show of hands on the article. 



168 



Cheryl Warshafsky requested a roll call vote. She felt 
that the Representative should be accountable to their 
constituents. The Moderator asked that the following 
tellers come forward and conduct a hand count: 
Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, Jean 
Horgan. Yes 33 a majority of 40 is needed. The motion 
for a roll call is denied. The Moderator then asked for a 
show of hands on the motion. Yes 111 No 36 2/3' s 
required which is 98, the motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Thomas Moran moved to 
withdraw this article. He will re-submit it for the Fall 
Meeting. He had been advised by Town Counsel that the 
wording of the article was in question. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried. The article 
read as follows: That the Town vote to protect and 
preserve the existing Town Common by prohibiting the 
building or placement of any additional structures on this 
important historical land. 

Philip Currier moved to adjourned the meeting until 
Monday May 2, 1994. Due to the lateness of the hour 
and that the next article might be subject to a lengthy 
discussion. The Moderator explained that there is a 
Special Town Meeting posted to be held on Thursday 
April 28th. Philip Currier withdrew his motion to 
adjourn, then asked that the meeting be adjourned to 
Thursday April 28th, 1994 at 7:30 PM at the Senior 
Center. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 
10:50 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Moderator Town Clerk 



169 



WARRANT FOR 

THE SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

APRIL 28, 1994 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the town meeting 
representatives of said Chelmsford to meet in the Senior 
Center, Groton Road, North Chelmsford, on Monday, the 
twenty-eighth day of April, at 7:30 p.m. o'clock in the 
evening, then and there to act upon the following articles, 
VIZ: 

For complete warrant information see original 
documents on file in the Town Clerk's Office. 



170 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
APRIL 28, 1994 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at the 
Senior Center by the Moderator Dennis E. McHugh at 
7:35 PM, who recognized the presence of a quorum. 
There were 149 Town Meeting Representatives present. 

Selectman Robert P. Joyce moved to waive the 
reading of the Constable's return of service and the 
posting of the warrant be waived. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 
Selectman Joyce moved to waive the reading of the 
warrant. Motion carried unanimously, by a show of 
hands. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Thomas Moran moved that the 
Town vote to have the town accountant provide quarterly 
financial reports to all precinct representatives. The 
reports would be structured the same as the annual town 
budget passed at town meeting. This report would be 
provided thirty days after each quarter and would show 
actual spending vs. the budget. 

Thomas Moran explained the article. He felt that this 
would further help and educate the Town Meeting 
Representatives. It shouldn't be more than three pages 
long, have the same format as the budget book. There 
would be no mailing, it would be noted in the local 
newspaper and on cable when it would be available at the 
Town Office Building for pick up. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands on the article. Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $12,500.00 for the purpose of providing Senior 
Citizen Real Estate Tax Payment Vouchers for services 
rendered, pursuant to an agreement to be formulated by 
the Council on Aging and approved by the Town 
Manager. 



171 



Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this 
article should have been on the Annual Town Meeting 
warrant, but due to an oversight it wasn't. This is an 
annual article. Qualified citizens work a certain amount 
of hours and in lieu of payment a voucher is issued and 
applied towards their payment of real estate taxes. The 
program has been a successful one and he asked for 
support of the article. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Selectmen were in favor 
of the article. A 2/3' s vote is required. The Moderator 
attempted to obtain an unanimous vote. The following 
tellers were called forward and a hand count was taken: 
Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Jean Horgan, Lucy 
Simonian. The results Yes 116 No 1, 2/3 's is 78 the 
article carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Peter Lawlor moved 
to defer action on this article until after article 6. 
Selectman Lawlor explained that due to this being a 
petitioned article, more time is needed to obtain further 
information regarding the funding. The Finance 
Committee was in favor of tabling the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion, 
motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Brad Emerson moved to waive 
the reading of the article. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator noted that the main motion reflects changes 
after the petitioner's meeting with the Planning Board. 
Attorney Joseph Shanahan who represents the Russell 
Mill Corporation, which is a local corporation owned and 
operated by the Finnegan and Katz families, who are 
town residents. They are proposing a real estate venture. 
As part of the proposal they are introducing by petition a 
zoning addition. It is not proposing to change the present 
zoning law, but to add a completely new section. To 
afford a alternative means of residential use, specifically 
it would be for senior living and or elder care projects. 
The situation arose about a year ago when Attorney 
Shanahan represented a client who was proposing the 



172 



congregate living facility on Summer Street. It was 160 
plus units that had a common dining room, notions shop, 
barber shop, beauty shop for use of those who lived in the 
building. This is a new concept which started in 
California and has started to become a popular concept on 
this coast. Presently the only way this can be done is 
through the Board of Appeals through the Special Permit 
process, and if approved it continues on to the Planning 
Board for site plan approval. A problem arose with the 
Summer Street project. A suit was filed citing that it 
became a change in land use. A commercial piece of 
property was being used for a residential use. Any 
change such as this cited should come before the Town 
Meeting body for approval first. This litigation was 
resolved on the Summer Street project, however any 
future projects will be facing the same issue. Therefore 
rather then take his clients proposal which is the next 
article, to the Board of Appeals and face possible 
litigation and knowing that the Town Meeting body 
defeated an article last year which would have 
empowered the Board to grant use variances, it was 
decided to draft a new section of the bylaw. He cited that 
the surrounding towns of Bedford, Concord, Carlisle and 
Lexington already have this type of by-law. So the 
information was compiled from these four communities 
and is before the body tonight. As a result meetings with 
the Town Meeting Representatives, Board of Appeals, 
Town Counsel, and the Planning Board, four changes 
have been made to the article. Attorney Shanahan briefly 
went over the four changes. He indicated that the 
Planning Board's recommendation was based on the 
changes to be incorporated into the article, and requested 
that a vote be made on the article with the changes being 
part of the article. Dennis Ready moved to vote the 
article with the changes incorporated. Town Counsel 
James Harrington felt that a vote should be made on the 
article as it appeared in the warrant, then a vote on the 
amendments. He questioned the changes being made, he 
wasn't informed about all four changes, only three, and 
requested more information. The Moderator asked for 
the Finance Committee and Selectmen's recommendation. 
The Finance Committee recommended the article as it 



173 



appeared in the warrant book. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Moderator then explained 
that he now had before him the main motion with the four 
changes incorporated and asked if there was any need for 
further discussion. Town Counsel again questioned the 
changes and wanted to know who initiated the changes 
and for what reason, because he was unaware about the 
Board of Appeals being eliminated from the process. 
Attorney Shanahan explained that he had made the 
changes concerning the Board of Appeals and waiting two 
years to return back to Town Meeting once denied. The 
Planning Board initiated the other two changes. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to 
amend. Motion carried. The article now reads as 
follows: James P. Good moved to amend the proposed 
Zoning By-law entitled "(Sec.) 4900. Senior Living and 
Elder Care Projects" from the form published in 
anticipation of the Planning Board public hearing on April 
13, 1994 and set forth in the Warrant to a form which 
incorporates the recommendations made by the Planning 
Board after its public hearing was closed on April 27, 
1994, and certain other revisions, as set forth on the 
attachment hereto. 

[Sec] 4900. Senior Living and Elder Care Projects 

4910. Purpose. Senior Living and Elder Care Projects 
(SLECP) allow by special permit from the board of 
appeals a greater flexibility in development from the 
pattern otherwise permitted in Chelmsford, provided that 
an application for such use is approved by the Town 
Meeting. It is intended to encourage the preservation of 
open spaces while at the same time allowing a greater 
mixture of buildings, structures and uses with special 
attention given to the concerns of the ill and elderly. 
Attention also shall be given by the planning board as to 
whether site layout, number, type and size of buildings 
and structures constitute a suitable project for the 
neighborhood within which it is to be located and enhance 
the quality of living for the SLECP residents, the 
immediate neighborhood and the Town generally. 



174 



4920. Definitions. 

4921. Nursing/Special Care Project. A project intended 
to provide the care of persons requiring daily 
attention by medical or nursing personnel or for 
reasons of ill health or physical incapacity. 

4922. Hospital Project. A project where sick or injured 
persons are to be given medical and surgical care. 

4923. Congregate Living Project. A project intended to 
provide private or communal lodging for persons 
requiring limited medical attention or supervision 
and who ordinarily are ambulatory. In addition to 
bed space such facilities may include semi-private or 
private food preparation facilities, common dining 
facilities and common semi-private or private bath 
and toilet facilities. 

4924. Independent Living Project. A project intended to 
provide independent dwelling for a retired or elderly 
couple or individual. In addition to bedspace such 
facilities ordinarily would include private toilet, 
bath, food preparation facilities and a private dining 
area. 

4925. Senior or Elder. Two or more persons sharing a 
household the older of whom is 50 years of age or 
over or a single person who is 50 years. 

4930. Standards. 

4931. Minimum Tract Size. Senior Living and Elder 
Care Projects shall be permitted upon a single tract 
in one ownership with definite boundaries 
ascertainable from a recordable deed or record plan 
which has an area of not less than twenty (20) acres, 
inclusive of wetlands and land situated within a 
Floodplain District. 



175 



Existing public or private ways need not constitute 
boundaries of the tract, but the area within such 
ways shall not be counted in determining minimum 
tract size. 

4932. Permissible Density. In a Senior Living or Elder 
Care Project shall not exceed an average of fourteen 
(14) persons per acre, exclusive of wetlands and 
land situated within a Floodplain District and 
Common Open Space required under Section 4837 
of this By-Law. 

4933. Permitted Uses, 
(a) Principal Uses: 

(1) Nursing/Special Care Project; 

(2) Hospital Project 

(3) Congregate Living Project; 

(4) Independent Living Project; 

(5) Day Care Center for senior or elderly persons; 

(6) Facilities for medical, rehabilitative, 
recreational, social and nutritional programs, 
dining rooms, kitchen facilities and laundry 
facilities; and 

(7) Any other uses permitted in a Residential 
District. 

(b) Accessory Uses 

Accessory uses incidental to the principal uses 
indicated above, including the following, provided 
that in all cases such accessory uses shall be for the 
benefit of the SLECP residents and retired or elderly 
persons and shall be limited in size and character 
necessary to serve such persons; 

(1) Limited administrative and professional offices 
which are required for the operation of any of the 
principal or accessory uses; 



17 6 



(2) Lounge, snack bar and related kitchen facilities, 
barber shop, beauty parlor and pharmacy; 

(3) Facilities for the sale of services and 
merchandise; and 

(c) Places of public assembly, including auditorium 
and chapel facilities. 

4934. Frontage and Yard Requirements. The minimum 
frontage for a SLECP tract shall be 150 feet. The 
minimum front yard setback for the tract shall be 
100 feet. The minimum side and rear yard setbacks 
for the tract shall be 40 feet. No parking, building 
or other above ground structure, except for a 
freestanding sign as allowed under Section 3300 of 
this By-Law, shall be located within the front, side 
or rear yard setbacks of the SLECP tract. The 
setbacks, except for road or utility crossings, shall 
provide a continuous landscaped perimeter, provided 
that nothing shall prevent the erection of walls and 
fences. 

4935. Height. The maximum height of any structure 
shall not exceed 35 feet. 

4936. Maximum Coverage. The maximum permitted 
building coverage shall not exceed 15% of the land 
situated outside the Common Open Space and no 
more that 5% of the maximum building coverage 
may be used for accessory structures. 

4937. Common Open Space. 

All land within the SLECP tract which is not 
specifically reserved for the support of the SLECP 
facilities and which is not covered by buildings, 
roads, driveways, parking areas or service areas, or 
which is not set aside as private yards, patios, or 
gardens for residents shall be Common Open Space. 
The area of Common Open Space shall equal at least 
25% of the total area of the SLECP tract and no 



177 



more than 50% of the minimum required Common 
Open Space shall be situated within the wetlands or 
Floodplain District. The Common Open Space shall 
have a shape, dimension, character and location 
suitable to enable its enjoyment and use for 
conservation or agricultural purposes by the 
residents of the SLECP. Provisions shall be made 
so that the Common Open Space is owned by the 
owners of the SLECP. 

In all cases, a perpetual restriction of the type 
described in Chapter 184, Section 31 of the Massachusetts 
General Laws (including future amendments thereto and 
corresponding provisions of future laws) shall be 
recorded in respect to such Common Open Space. Such 
restrictions shall provide that the Common Open Space 
shall be retained in perpetuity for use by the residents in 
the SLECP for the purposes of conservation or 
agriculture. The restriction shall specifically prohibit the 
use of Common Open Space for all-terrain vehicles, 
snowmobiles, motorbikes, motorcycles and similar 
vehicles, except golf carts. it shall prohibit the 
construction of any above ground structures, buildings, 
road and paved areas, except for the construction and 
maintenance of bicycle, equestrian and foot paths or 
similar facilities intended to foster active recreation by the 
residents and a "recreation building" ancillary thereto. 

4938. Parking. Except as provided in this section, all 
parking shall comply to the extent applicable with 
the provisions of Sec 3100. Off-street parking and 
loading. 

(a) Nursing/Special Care or Hospital Project. One 
parking space for every sleeping room for single 
or double occupancy or where not divided into 
such rooms one parking space for each two beds. 

(b) Congregate Living Project. One parking space 
for each 20 beds. 



178 



(c) Independent Living Project. One parking space 
fore each dwelling unit. 

(d) Employees, One Parking space for each three 
employees which can be reasonable expected at 
any one time on the premises. 



(e) Public Assembly. One parking space for each 
four seats of rated capacity in the largest place 
designate for regular use as a place of public 
assembly. 

(f) Visitors. One parking space for each 20 residents 
in the congregate living or independent living 
facilities. 

4939. Procedure for Approval. 

(a) Town Meeting Approval 

(1) Any person who desires a special permit from 
the board of appeals for a SLECP shall first 
present the proposed SLECP to the town 
meeting for approval. 

(i) Presentation. The presentation to the Town 
Meeting shall contain, but not be limited to, the 
following information: 

- the SLECP name (If any); 

- Preliminary site layout, which shall contain the 
boundaries, of the SLECP tract, proposed 
structures, drives, parking, landscaping, 
screening, fences, walls, walks and outdoor 
lighting. 

- Preliminary topography and drainage plan (s); 



17 9 



- Preliminary utility and landscaping plan (s); 

- Preliminary architectural plan (s) 

(ii) Approval. NO SLECP shall be approved by 
the Town Meeting except by a two thirds vote 
of those present and voting. 

(2) No proposed SLECP which has been 
unfavorably acted upon by the town meeting 
shall be considered by the Town Meeting 
within two years after the date of such 
unfavorable action. 

(3) After approval by the Town Meeting, 
including such cases where Town Meeting 
approval has been deemed to have been 
granted, an application shall be submitted to the 
board of appeals for a special permit in 
accordance with all the procedures for approval 
hereinafter set forth. A special permit shall be 
issued only if the board of appeals shall find 
that the plans submitted to it conform 
substantially to the terms of the approval 
granted by the Town Meeting and provided 
further that such permit shall be issued in 
conformance with the provisions of this 
By-Law. the board of appeals may, in its 
discretion, permit minor deviations from the 
preliminary application as approved by the 
Town Meeting so long as it finds that such 
deviations are not substantially inconsistent 
with the Town Meeting approval. 

(b) Application to Board of Appeals. 

After approval by the Town Meeting in 
accordance with Subsection 4939 (a), any 
person who desires a special permit for a 
SLECP shall submit a application in writing in 
such form as the board of appeals may require 
which shall include the following: 



180 



(1) A development statement including a 
petition, a list of parties in interest with 
respect to the SLECP tract, the names and 
specific functions of the development team 
and a site evaluation statement. The 
statement shall set forth the development 
concept in detail, including in tabular form 
the number of facilities, type, estimated 
resident population, size (number of 
bedrooms, floor area) ground coverage, the 
area of the SLECP and Common Open 
Space, specifying the portions of each which 
is situated within wetlands or Floodplain 
District as a percentage of the total area of 
the SLECP tract and a development schedule 



for all site improvements together with 
copies of all proposed instruments, including 
the Common Open Space perpetual 
restriction. 

(2) Development plans bearing the seal of a 
Massachusetts Registered Architect, 
Registered Civil Engineer or similar 
professional as appropriate and consisting 
of: 

(i) Site Plans and Specifications showing all 
site improvements and meeting, to the 
extent applicable, the requirements set 
forth for a Definitive Plan in the 
Subdivision Rules and Regulations of the 
Planning Board and/or Site Plan in 
section 1420 of this By-Law. 

(ii) Site perspective, section, elevations and 
typical floor plans; 



181 



(iii) Detailed plans for disposal of sanitary 
sewer and surface drainage; and 

(iv) Detailed plans for landscaping. 

(3) The Board of Appeals shall, within ten days 
of receipt of an application under Section 
4900, refer the application to the Planning 
Board, Conservation Commission, 
Department of Public Works, Board of 
Health and Building Inspector for written 
reports and recommendations and no 
decisions shall be made until such reports 
are returned or 35 days have elapsed 
following such referral without receipt of 
such reports. 

(4) Planning Board Report and 
Recommendation. 

The Planning Board shall review the 
petition and plans and shall submit in writing 
to the board of appeals its report and 
recommendations relating to the proposed 
development, including at least the 
following: 

(a) An evaluation of the natural terrain of the 
SLECP tract and surrounding areas and 
of the neighborhood in which the tract is 
situated. 

(b) An evaluation of the proposed 
development, including the design and 
use of buildings, roads, utilities, 
drainage, and of the open spaces of 
pedestrian and vehicular circulation of the 
location and adequacy of parking and of 
the provisions for grading, landscaping 
and screening. 



182 



(c) Its opinion as to whether the proposed 
site layout, number, type, size and 
configuration of housing and other 
structures constitute a suitable 
development for the neighborhood within 
which it is located. 

(d) The effect of the proposed layout on the 
town's existing roadways, water supply 
and sewage disposal facilities. 

(e) The statement that the applicant's plans 
comply, as applicable, with the 
Subdivision Rules and Regulations and/or 
site plan review requirements of the 
planning board or, wherever such plans 
do not comply, a statement of the respects 
in which they do not so comply. 

(f) Recommendations for the granting or 
denial of the Special Permit, including 
recommendations for modifications, 
restrictions or requirements to be imposed 
as a condition of granting the Special 
Permit. 

(5) Conservation commission's Report and 
Recommendations . 

The Conservation Commission shall 
review the petition and plans and shall 
submit in writing to the Board its report 
and recommendations upon the degree to 
which the proposed project enhances the 
conservation of significant environmental 
qualities, including at least: 

(a) An evaluation and opinion upon the 
degree to which the project itself affects 
critical environmental areas. 



183 



(b) An evaluation and opinion upon the 
degree to which the Common Open 
Space conserves: 

(i) Critical environmental areas and 
provides a valuable outdoor resource: 

(ii) Enhances the long-term conservation 
of critical environmental areas unique 
natural features, scenic vistas or 
potential for existing farmland; or 

(iii) Provides a valuable addition to the 
open space resources of the Town 

(6) Board of Appeals Grant. 

A Special Permit may be issued under 
this Section only if the board of appeals 
finds that the SLECP conforms to the 
requirements and is in harmony with the 
general purpose and intent of this 
Section, and that the site layout, number, 
type and size of buildings and structures 
constitute a suitable development for the 
neighborhood in the vicinity of the 
SLECP. If a Special permit is granted 
the Board of Appeals may impose as a 
condition thereof that the installation of 
municipal services and construction of 
interior drives within the SLECP shall 
comply, to the extent applicable, with 
the requirements of the Subdivision 
Rules and Regulations of the Planning 
Board, and may require sufficient 
security to ensure such compliance and 
the completion of planned recreational 
facilities and site amenities and may 
impose such additional conditions and 
safeguards as public safety, welfare and 
convenience may require, either as 
recommended by the Planning Board or 



184 



Conservation Commission or upon its 
own initiative. The Board of Appeals 
shall give due consideration to the 
reports of the Planning Board and 
Conservation Commission and if the 
decision of the Board of Appeals differs 
from the recommendations of the 
Planning Board or Conservation 
Commission, the reasons therefor shall 
be stated in writing. 

The Board of Appeals, as a condition of 
a Special Permit issued under Section 
4900, shall impose appropriate 
limitations and safeguards to insure the 
minimum age requirement and maximum 
permissible density shall be maintained 
within the SLECP in perpetuity. Such 
limitations and safeguards may be in the 
form of deed restrictions, resale 
monitoring, requirements for age 
verification of purchasers and/or tenants, 
rent level and condominium fee penalties 
and the like. 

(c) Application to Planning Board. 

After approval by the Town Meeting in 
accordance with Subsection 4930 (a) and 
the issuance of a special permit by the 
Board of Appeals in accordance with 
Subsection 4939 (b), any person 
proposing a SLECP shall then submit 
and application in writing to the Planning 
Board for site plan review and the 
Planning Board shall process and act 
upon said application in accordance with 
the provisions of Section 1400 of the 
by-law. 



185 



AND ADDING A NEW SECTION TO THE 
RESIDENTIAL USED SET FORTH UNDER SECTION 
2300 AS FOLLOWS: 



Residential Uses 



Single Family Dwelling: 

P P P P O O 00000000 

Two Family Dwelling: 

O O P P O O 00000000 

Multifamily Dwelling: 

OOOPBOO 00000000 

Conversion of Dwellings: 

(see sec 2560 OBAPBAOO 00000000 
Boarding Houses: 

OOPOOP OPOOOOOO 
Mobile Home: 

000P(6)000 
Cluster Development: 
PBPBOOOO 00000 000 
Senior Living and 
Elder Care Projects: 
O BABABABABA O BA BA O 000 

A lengthy question and answer period took place. 
David McLachlan, Glenn Thoren, Barbara Scavezze, 
Dean Camerias, George Merrill, Paul Gleason, Chris 
Garrahan, questioned the acreage, the age of 50, 
professional review of the by-law, taxes to be paid if a 
non profit group builds a complex. Bob Morse research 
the other communities where the by-law has been passed 
and shared the information. 95% of the by-law comes 
from the Town of Bedford by-law, which was done for 
one specific project. Some of the sections in theproposed 
article were changed from those passed in the other 
Towns. He felt that the Town should be careful of 
passing a by-law that would allow over building on 
limited acreage. William Dalton felt that the Board of 
Appeals was more qualified than the Representatives 
when it came to reading and understanding the 



186 



information, and that they should be the ones who vote 
and make a recommendation not the Town Meeting Body. 
He asked for Town Counsel's opinion on what would be 
in the best interest of the Town. James Harrington, Town 
Counsel came forward and said that he was troubled by 
the removal of the need to go to any Town Board before 
Town Meeting. He was troubled that he was not asked 
for his review of the by-law, and the fact that the 
Planning Board should be the ones who study, prepare, 
and present to the Body any major zoning by- law, not a 
developer. Samuel Poulten moved to amend the article 
with the wording: To require that Elder Care/Senior 
Living projects first be presented to the Zoning Board and 
Planning Board for their recommendations prior to action 
by Town Meeting. James Sousa cautioned the Body that 
they should concentrate on the by-law, not who was 
going to review any project. If this by-law passes this is 
how the procedure will be followed, regardless who 
recommends whatever. The Moderator asked for the 
Finance Committee's recommendation. The Finance 
Committee recommended the motion to amend. The 
Board of Selectmen also recommended the motion. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion defeated. 
Thomas Welch spoke in favor of the article. Michael 
Sokol moved the question to stop debate. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried. The 
Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation on the article. The Finance Committee 
did not recommend the article. The majority of the Board 
of Selectmen did not recommend the article. James Good 
Chairman of the Planning Board read the Planning 
Board's recommendation. The Planning Board held a 
Public hearing on April 13, 1994 on the above mentioned 
article. At the meeting of April 27, 1994, the Planning 
Board voted (6-1) to recommend an amendment to the 
Town of Chelmsford Zoning by-laws by adding a new 
section under Section 4900 Senior Living and Elder Care 
Projects, as amended. The Planning Board will only 
make this recommendation based on a new provision 
being included. They recommend that under Section 
4939 Procedure for Approval, (b) Grant, the following 
restrictions are added to insure the future availability of 



187 



these units for occupancy by residents 50 years or older, 
be added. The Planning Board recommended the addition 
as follows: 

The Board of Appeals, as a condition of a Special 
permit issued under Section 4900, shall impose 
appropriate limitations and safeguards to insure the 
minimum age retirement and maximum permissible 
density shall be maintained within the SLECP in 
perpetuity. Such limitations and safeguards may be in the 
form of deed restrictions, resale monitoring, requirements 
for age verification of purchases and/or tenants, rent level 
and condominium fee penalties and the like. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the article as 
amended. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Chairman of the Planning 
Board James Good moved that the Town vote to approve 
an Independent Living Project under section 4900 of the 
Zoning By-law to be developed on a parcel of land, 
containing approximately 21.80 acres, situated on the 
easterly side of Mill Road. 

James Good Chairman of the Planning Board, moved 
to with draw this article due to the defeat of the previous 
article. The Finance Committee and the Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the withdrawal. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Selectman Robert Joyce moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire in fee simple the land with the buildings and trees 
thereon by purchase, eminent domain, or otherwise the 
property located at 24 Central Square, Chelmsford , 
Massachusetts, and further described in the deeds 
recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds in Book 992, Page 429 and Book 1018, Page 163; 
for the purpose of providing municipal parking and to see 
if the Town will vote to borrow they sum of $101,000.00 
to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses in 



188 



connection with the acquisition of said land and for 
paying any damages which may be awarded as the result 
of any such taking. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that this 
property is located in Central Square. The Board of 
Selectmen had voted a year ago to remove parking spaces 
in front of the bank. By purchasing or taking the 
property by eminent domain, addition parking can be 
regained for the businesses located in the square. 

A number of Representatives spoke against the article. 
The concern was of taking down the building when it 
could be possibly sold to someone who would be willing 
to refurbish it. There is parking within the area, 
however, there is question about liability. Robert Joyce 
said many of the business people express the need for 
additional parking. Businesses are leaving the square and 
going else where. He asked for support of the article and 
added that the town could float a five year bond and 
install meters to help defray the costs. The Moderator 
asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. The 
Finance Committee was against the article. Chairman 
Dwight Hayward said that the committee felt it was an 
expensive parking lot. The Board of Selectmen voted four 
to one in favor of the article. More discussion took 
place. Henrick Johnson spoke in favor of the article. 
Matthew Doyle moved the question. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
defeated. 

Michael Sokol moved to adjourn the Special Town 
Meeting and the Annual Town Meeting to Monday May 
2, 1994 to the Senior Center at 7:30 PM. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried. The meeting 
adjourned at 10:55 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Moderator Town Clerk 



189 



ADJOURNED SPECIAL 

TOWN MEETING 

MAY 2, 1994 

The Adjourned Special Town Meeting was called to 
order at the Senior Center by the Moderator Dennis E. 
McHugh at 7:35 PM, who recognized the presence of a 
quorum. There were 150 Town Meeting Representatives 
present. 

The Moderator explained that the first order of 
business was to be article three, which had been tabled 
and to be acted upon at the conclusion of article six. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 W. Allen Thomas moved that 
the Town vote to transfer the sum of $5,000.00 from 
available funds from unexpended bonds under Article 13 
of the Annual Town Meeting of 1988 for the purpose of 
preparing plans and specifications for renovating the girls 
locker room facilities at Chelmsford High School to more 
closely reach parity with the boys locker room facilities 
Chelmsford High School, said contracts to be made under 
the supervision of the Athletic Task Force Committee. 

James Moriarty of the Athletic Task Force explained 
the article. When the School was built in 1973 the locker 
rooms were installed, however sometime on or about 
1980, the boys locker room was upgraded. There is a 
definite need for the upgrade. The Task force is asking 
for $5,000.00 at this time in order to make a complete 
study of the total expense. They will present a report 
with figures and plans at the October meeting and at 
which time make a request for the amount of monies 
needed. Town Manager Lynch explained that this was 
going to be a capital planning article, but instead 
withdrew the project for now and will deduct the $5,000. 
from the actual amount when the final figure is 
determined. A numerous amount of questions were 
asked. Michael Sokol moved the question. The 
Moderator asked for the recommendation from the 
Finance Committee. The Finance Committee was in 
favor of the article. The Board of Selectmen supported 



190 



the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on 
the motion to stop debate. Motion carried, unanimously. 
The Moderator then asked for a show of hands on the 
article, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $95,000. 
from Line Item 31, Interest to amend FY94 Budget by 
increasing Line Item 29, Undistributed Expenses. 

Bernard Lynch explained that this amount is for the 
Middlesex County Retirement System. The Finance 
Committee and the Board of Selectmen recommended the 
article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried, unanimously. 

Seeing that there was no further business at hand, the 
Moderator adjourned the Special Town Meeting sine die 
at 8:10 PM. 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting reconvened at 
8:10 PM 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Chairman of the Sewer 
Commission John Emerson Jr moved that the Town vote 
to amend the Chelmsford Home Rule Charter under part 
VIII Transitional Provisions, Section 8-5 (1) Time of 
Taking Effect, by deleting the following: 

(1) The Sewer Commission shall cease to exist and be 
dissolved on January 1, 2005, and all duties, 
powers, functions and assets shall be assigned to 
the department of public works or its successor 
agency. 

and add the following as Part VIII, Section 8-5 (1): 

(1) The Sewer Commission shall cease to exist and be 
dissolved upon completion of the sewer project at 
which time all duties, powers, functions and assets 
shall be assigned to the department of public works 
or its successor agency. 



191 



Chairman of the Sewer Commission, John Emerson 
explained the purpose of the article. The Commission 
felt that they should stay elected and in control until the 
completion of the entire sewer project. To date 43 % of 
the town wide project is completed. Once the project is 
completed over 68% of the Town will be sewered. The 
remaining areas to be sewered include: 

The Westlands, Freeman Lake Area, Westford St. 
Area, North Road Area, East Chelmsford, Hart 
Pond, and approved petitioned areas. 

Any monies for projects have to be requested so far in 
advance of the actual construction of a phase that an 
elected board has more clout on the Federal or State level 
when the time comes for requesting funding. He further 
explained that by being an elected board vs an appointed 
board more accountability is expected by the taxpayers. 
An elected board has control over the fee's etc. An 
appointed Board would not necessarily have this control. 
This would require a question to be put on the April 1995 
Town Ballot. 

A numerous amount of questions were asked. One 
was why not just extend the time period for another five 
or ten years? It was explained that this required a change 
to the charter so it would make more sense to dissolve the 
commission when everything was done rather then have 
to keep coming back amending the charter and putting a 
question on the ballot. The Moderator asked for Finance 
Committee's recommendation. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended four in favor to one absent on the article. 
Many Representatives spoke in favor of the article. State 
Laws are going to become more strict regarding septic 
systems and the need is there to keep the Commission. 
Edward Marshall moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. The Moderator attempted for a vote by 
way of a show of hands, a 2/3 's vote is required, the 



192 



following tellers came forward and conducted a hand 
count: Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, 
Jean Horgan. Yes 126 No 8 2/3' s is 89 the motion 
carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Christopher Garrahan moved 
that the Town vote to amend the General By-laws Article 
XI General Wetland By-Law Section 1. Applications by 
deleting the last sentence of the second paragraph and 
inserting the following in its place: 

"Provided however that the construction of any 
building as defined herein on any lot having an area of 
40,000 square feet or more, shall be prohibited within 
fifty (50) feet of any bank, fresh water wetland, beach, 
flat, marsh, meadow, bog, swamp, bordering on any 
estuary, creek, river, stream, or lake or any land under 
said waters and any parking lot containing 10 or more 
parking spaces on any lot having an area 40,000 square 
feet or more, shall be prohibited within twenty-five (25) 
feet of any bank, fresh water wetland, beach, flat, marsh, 
meadow, bog, swamp, bordering on any estuary, creek, 
river, stream, or lake or any land under said waters." 

The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen 
were in favor of the article. David McLachlan of the 
Conservation Commission, moved to amend the article by 
changing the section which says twenty-five (25) feet to 
read fifty (50) feet of any bank, fresh water wetland etc. 
David McLachlan explained the amendment. Presently a 
parking lot run off is more damaging then a run off from 
a building. Glenn Thoren supported the amendment. 
Robert Joyce asked how the rest of the Conservation 
Commission felt about the amendment. Christopher 
Garrahan said that enforcement may be difficult. John 
Harrington spoke against the amendment. The Moderator 
asked for the Finance Committee's recommendation. The 
Finance Committee was in favor of the amendment. The 
Board of Selectmen supported the amendment. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to 



193 



amend, motion carried. He then asked for a show of 
hands on the article as amended, motion carried and reads 
as follows: 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General 
By-laws Article XI General Wetland By-Law Section 1 
Applications by deleting the last sentence of the second 
paragraph and inserting the following in its place: 

Provided however that the construction of any 
building as defined herein and any parking lot containing 
10 or more parking spaces on any lot having an area of 
40,000 square feet or more, shall be prohibited within 
fifty (50) feet of any bank, fresh waters wetland, beach, 
flat, marsh, meadow, bog, swamp, bordering on any 
estuary creek, river, stream, or lake or any land under 
said waters. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Christopher Garrahan moved 
that the Town vote to amend the General By-laws, Article 
XI General Wetlands By-Law Section 16 Definitions 
subsection (e) by adding the following sentence: 

"The boundary of these wetlands is the line within 
which fifty (50) percent or more of the vegetation consists 
of wetland plant species as set forth in Massachusetts 
General Laws Chapter 131, Section 40 and in situations 
where a dispute exists the line within which the soil 
conditions meet the technical criterion of a hydric soil as 
defined by currently approved Army Corps of Engineers 
delineation manual. 

Christopher Garrahan explained the article. The 
Finance Committee supported the article. The Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
explained that the Town is selling assets that it does not 
need. This article and the following seven is about land 
that is town owned. In order to sell it, the town must 
conform to State Law Chapter 30B and go out for 



194 



competitive bid. This land was taken due to back taxes 
being owed. Christopher Garrahan questioned why the 
land wasn't deeded over to the Town? If the land is 
unbuildable due to being wet then it shouldn't be sold off, 
this is one way that the Town could preserve it's wetlands 
and open space. Robert Hall questioned if it was 
necessary to say minimum bid amount should be stated in 
the article. Town Counsel James Harrington said that it 
could be added. Robert Hall moved to amend the article 
by adding the wording minimum bid. The Finance 
Committee and the Board of Selectmen supported the 
article. William Dalton moved to delete the motion under 
this article and made the following motion: That the 
Board of Selectmen be authorized to transfer management 
and control of a certain parcel of land on 13 Harold 
Street, shown as Lot 24 on Assessor's Map 132 
containing 25,170 square feet more or less and more fully 
described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 6218 Page 66, to the 
Conservation Commission pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 
40 section 8C. that the Town of Chelmsford deed this lot 
control and supervision of the Conservation Commission. 
William Dalton said that this amendment could be applied 
to all the land articles 8 thru 15, if so voted. Robert Hall 
withdrew his motion. The Finance Committee was in 
favor of the amendment. The Board of Selectmen were 
in favor of the amendment. Questions were asked 
concerning who would maintain the property. The owner 
would maintain it. The Town is the owner, so nothing 
would change. Ronald Wetmore speaking as a water 
commissioner, said that the commissioners would be in 
favor of because it would protect the water wells and 
open space. The Moderator asked for a vote on the 
motion to amend. Motion carried. He then asked for a 
show of hands on the main motion, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 William Dalton moved to 
delete the motion under this article and made the 
following motion: That the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to transfer management and control of a 
certain parcel of land on 1 1 Harold Street, shown as Lot 



195 



25 on Assessor's Map 132 containing 29,060 square feet 
more or less and more fully described in a deed recorded 
in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in 
Book 6218 Page 67, to the Conservation Commission 
pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 40 section 8C. The 
Moderator asked for the Finance Committee and Board of 
Selectmen's recommendation. The Finance Committee 
was in favor of the article. The Board of Selectmen were 
in favor of the article. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands on the motion to amend, motion carried. He 
then asked for a show of hands on the article as amended, 
motion carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 William Dalton moved to 
delete the motion under this article and made the 
following motion: That the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to transfer management and control of a 
certain parcel of land on University Lane, Shown as Lot 

26 on Assessor's Map 133 containing 1.5 acres 

more or less and more fully described in a deed recorded 
in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in 
Book 6250 Page 134, to the Conservation Commission 
pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 40 section 8C. The 
Moderator asked for the Finance Committee and Board of 
Selectmen's recommendation. The Finance Committee 
was in favor of the article. The Board of Selectmen were 
in favor of the article. Brad Emerson spoke against the 
article. Christopher Garrahan spoke in favor. Barry 
Balan moved the question. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands on the motion to stop debate. Motion 
carried, unanimously. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands on the motion to amend motion carried. He then 
asked for a show of hands on the article as amended, 
which left the Chair in doubt. The tellers came forward 
and a hand count was taken. Yes 108 No 23 2/3 's is 
87, the motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11 Bernard Lynch explained that 
it was planned to dismiss this article, due to the fact that 
the land abuts Land Trust Land. William Dalton moved 
to delete the motion under this article and made the 
following motion: That the Board of Selectmen be 



196 



authorized to transfer management and control of a 
certain parcel of land on University Lane shown as Lot 45 
on Assessor's Map 133 containing 2.15 acres more or less 
and more fully described in a deed recorded in the 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 6250 
Page 135, to the Conservation Commission pursuant to 
M.G.L. Chapter 40 section 8C. The Moderator asked 
for the Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee was in favor 
of the article. The Board of Selectmen were in favor of 
the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on 
the motion to amend, motion carried. He then asked for 
a show of hands on the article as amended, motion 
carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 William Dalton moved to 
delete the motion under this article and made the 
following motion: That the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to transfer management and control of a 
certain parcel of land on South Row Street, shown as Lot 
25 on Assessor's Map 141 containing 15,000 square feet 
more or less and more fully described in a deed recorded 
in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in 
Book 6250 Page 136, to the Conservation Commission 
pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 40 section 8C. The 
Moderator asked for the Finance Committee and Board of 
Selectmen's recommendation. The Finance Committee 
was in favor of the article. The Board of Selectmen were 
in favor of the article. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands on the motion to amend, motion carried. He 
then asked for a show of hands on the article as amended, 
motion carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 John Emerson questioned if 
this could be an actual building lot. Town Manager 
Bernard Lynch said there was a possibility that it could be 
combined with another lot and become a buildable lot. 
The Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen were 
in favor of the article. Michael Sokol moved the question. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried. He asked for a show of hands on the article. 
Motion carried, unanimously. The article reads as 



197 



follows: Selectman Robert Joyce moved that the Town 
vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to convey in 
accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 30B, for consideration 
to be determined all right, title and interest, if any held 
by the Town, in a certain parcel of land on Dover Street, 
shown as Lot 28 on Assessor's Map 45, containing 5000 
square feet more or less; and more fully described in a 
deed recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds in Book 2153, Page 301 . 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Bernard Lynch explained that 
this land has frontage on Billerica Road and abuts route 
three. It is an unbuildable lot. William Dalton moved to 
delete the motion under this article and made the 
following motion: That the Board of Selectmen be 
authorized to transfer management and control of a 
certain parcel of land on Billerica Road shown as Lot 5 
on Assessor's Map 119 containing 1.26 acres more or less 
and more fully described in a deed recorded in the 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 6761 
Page 165, to the Conservation Commission pursuant to 
M.G.L. Chapter 40 section 8C. The Moderator asked 
for the Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee was in favor 
of the article. The Board of Selectmen were in favor of 
the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on 
the motion to amend, motion carried. He then asked for 
a show of hands on the article as amended, motion 
carried unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 15 Selectman Robert Joyce 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 
30B, for consideration to be determined all right, title and 
interest, if any held by the Town, in a certain parcel of 
land off Second Street shown as Lot 32 on Assessor's 
Map 130, containing 4127 square feet more or less; and 
more fully described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds in Book 6933, Page 38. 



198 



Bernard Lynch explained that this land has an assessed 
value of $26,000. Christopher Garrahan felt it should be 
sold. The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee supported the 
article. The Board of Selectmen were in favor of the 
article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
article. Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Charles Piper moved that the 
Town vote to appoint a committee to consist of one Town 
Meeting Representative from each precinct to be elected 
by the Representatives of that precinct for the purpose of 
conducting a study and preparing a report of 
recommendation to the Town Meeting to increase the 
accountability of Town Meeting Representatives. These 
recommendations may take the form of proposed 
amendments to the General Bylaws or Charter as deemed 
appropriated. The report to be presented at the Fiscal 
1995 Fall Annual Town Meeting. 

Charles Piper explained the article. He gave a 
presentation which showed the various hand counted 
votes taken vs the recorded attendance on the particular 
night. He felt that more accountability should be made. 
A number of questions were asked. The Finance 
Committee was in favor of the article. A majority of the 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the article. Michael 
Sokol spoke against the article. Thomas Moran moved to 
amend the article. By striking the words increase the 
accountability of the Town Meeting Representatives. 
And insert in it's place: Study voting procedure of Town 
Meeting Representatives and make recommendations to 
Town Meeting. A discussion took place. The Finance 
Committee was in favor of the motion to amend. The 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the amendment. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to 
amend, motion carried. More discussion took place. 
Jacob Sartz spoke against the article. Bill Dalton spoke in 
favor of the article. John Emerson moved the question to 
stop debate. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
motion carried. The Moderator then asked for a show of 
hands on the main motion as amended, which left the 



199 



Chair in doubt. The tellers came forward and a hand 
count was taken. Jeff Stallard question if a roll call could 
be taken at this time. The Moderator explained that it 
could not. He further explained that this was due to the 
tellers being in the process of taking a hand count. If at 
the conclusion of the hand count and after the vote is 
read, then the vote could be reconsidered at which time a 
roll call could be taken if so desired. The result of the 
hand count Yes 69 No 65, the motion carried. The 
Article reads as follows: 

Charles Piper moved that the Town vote to 
appoint a committee to consist of one Town Meeting 
Representative from each precinct to be elected by the 
Representatives of that precinct for the purpose of 
conducting a study and preparing a report of 
recommendation to the Town Meeting to study voting 
procedure of Town Meeting Representatives and make 
recommendations to Town Meeting. These 
recommendations may take the form of proposed 
amendments to the General Bylaws or Charteras deemed 
appropriated. The report to be presented at the Fiscal 
1995 Fall Annual Town Meeting. 

Cheryl Warshafsky moved to adjourn the Annual 
Town Meeting until Thursday May 5, 1994 at 7:30 PM at 
the Senior Citizen Center. Motion carried. The meeting 
adjourned at 11:30 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Moderator Town Clerk 



200 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL 

TOWN MEETING 

MAY 5, 1994 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at the Senior Center by the Moderator Dennis E. 
McHugh at 7:35 PM, who recognized the presence of a 
quorum. There were 138 Town Meeting Representatives 
present. 

The Moderator announced that all the Representatives 
were to gather within their precincts and elect among 
them one representative to the Voting Procedure 
Committee, so named by the Moderator. This Committee 
was established under article 16 at the May 2, 1994 
adjourned Annual Meeting. Once a person has been 
elected they are to give the name to the Town Clerk for 
the record. The Members elected to the Voting 
Procedure Committee are as follows: 

Pet 1 Sandra Kilburn (voted 5-9-94 mtg due to lack of 
quorum of Reps present at the time) 

2 George Merrill 

3 Susan Olsen 

4 Jacob Sartz 

5 Steven Mallette 

6 Edward Marshall 

7 Leonard Doolan 

8 Gail Poulten 

9 Alan Pajak 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Selectman Robert Joyce 
moved to waive the reading of the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion, 
motion carried. Town Manager Bernard Lynch said that 
this article is the result of many meetings with the 
Business Community of the Town. The funding for this 
proposed article is derived from the local room occupancy 
tax currently in effect. This article seeks to designate a 
portion of those funds as explained in the article. Douglas 
Houser of the Business Association came forward and 
explained the article. The purpose was to promote The 



201 



Town of Chelmsford. The article would reflect that the 
Town supports its local business establishments, many of 
which are owned by residents of this community. It 
would be a reinvestment into the community. The 
Finance Committee wanted to hear more discussion 
before recommending the article. A majority of the 
Board of Selectmen supported the article. Numerous 
questions were asked. John Harrington explained that 
$2.10 is paid per room per night, which amounts to 
approximately $30,000. a year in room taxes paid to the 
town. The Town Meeting Body would decide each year 
the percentage that could be taken from the fund and 
used. The Business Association would like to promote 
exit 34 off of 495. This is the area where two of the local 
hotels are located and other establishments. He asked for 
support of the article. Ed Cady questioned who would 
expend the funds. The Town Manager explained that 
there would be a five person committee appointed. 
Michael Bahia asked if this would be a annual article. 
The Town Manager said it would be. David McLachlan 
spoke against the article. Matthew Doyle said more 
information should be given. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands. Motion defeated. For 
the record the article read as follows: 

Town Manager Bernard T. Lynch moved to see if the 
Town will vote to petition the Great and General Court of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to adopt Special 
Legislation pertaining to the Town of Chelmsford as 
follows: AN ACT ESTABLISHING A VISITOR 
PROMOTION FUND AND ECONOMIC 

DEVELOPMENT FUND IN THE TOWN OF 
CHELMSFORD. Be it enacted by the Senate and House 
of Representatives in General Court assembled, and by 
the authority of the same, as follows: 

SECTION 1. Notwithstanding the provisions of 
section fifty-three of chapter forty-four of the General 
Laws or any other general or special law to the contrary, 
the Town of Chelmsford is hereby authorized to establish 
in the town treasury a special account to be known as the 



202 



"Visitor Promotion and Economic Development Fund," 
into which account may be deposited certain receipts 
which comprise a portion of the total local room 
occupancy tax received annually by the Town under the 
provisions of section three A of Chapter sixty- four G of 
the General Laws. 

SECTION 2. For the purposes of establishing the 
portion of the local room occupancy tax that may be 
deposited in the Visitor Promotion and Economic 
Development Fund the town is hereby authorize to 
deposit, commencing during the fiscal year nineteen 
hundred and ninety-five, up to twenty-five percent of all 
local room occupancy tax receipts; in fiscal year nineteen 
hundred and ninety-six, up to thirty-five percent of all 
receipts from said tax; in fiscal year nineteen hundred and 
ninety-seven, up to forty-five percent of all receipts from 
said tax; and in each fiscal year subsequent to fiscal year 
nineteen hundred and ninety-seven, up to forty-five 
percent of all local room occupancy tax receipts may be 
deposited in said fund. All interest earned from said fund 
shall be treated as general fund revenue of the town of 
Chelmsford. The exact percentage of funds to be 
designated each fiscal year shall be determined by vote of 
Town Meeting at the spring Annual Town Meeting. 

SECTION 3. There is hereby established in the town 
of Chelmsford a visitor services board consisting of five 
members to be appointed by the Town Manager as 
follows: one member nominated by the Chelmsford 
Business Association, Inc. , one member nominated by the 
Regional Visitors Council, and three members at large. 
If any of the organizations with nominating privileges 
hereunder cease to exist or operate, the Town Manager 
may appoint in place of such nominees individuals 
qualified to serve on said visitor services board as 
appointees at-large. The Town Manager shall fill any 
vacancies in said visitor services board in a like manner. 

SECTION 4. The visitor services board shall 
recommend to the Spring Annual Town Meeting, 
commencing with the nineteen hundred and ninety-five 



203 



spring town meeting, programs and projects that enhance 
the beautification, recreational resources, public safety, 
promotional and marketing activities, events, services, 
and public improvements which are of clear mutual 
interest to the residents and visitors to the Town of 
Chelmsford and which strengthen said town as an 
attractive center for tourism, conventions, and related 
purposes of the visitor industry. The cost of such 
programs shall not exceed the funds available in the 
Visitor Promotion and Economic Development Fund , 
and shall be allocated by vote of the Town Meeting as 
follows: no less than ten percent and no more than forty 
percent of said Visitor Promotion and Economic 
Development Fund shall be used for public improvements 
including beautification, recreational resources, and 
public safety related to the mutual needs of visitors and 
residents with the balance available for promotional 
programs and projects. 

SECTION 5. Upon approval by town meeting of the 
programs, services and other projects set forth under 
section four of this act, the visitor services board with the 
approval of the town manager shall be empowered to 
expend from said special revenue fund for the uses 
authorized by town meeting and may for the purposes of 
this section designate funds to be expended under the 
direction of the Chelmsford department of public works 
or other town agency as applicable; or obtain competitive 
proposals or bids for any services, programs or projects 
to be provided to the town by vendor contracts, all in 
accordance with the requirements of chapter thirty B of 
the General Laws or any other general law governing 
public bidding and procurement as may apply to the 
program or project. Any and all contracts for services, 
programs and projects authorized hereunder shall be 
awarded and executed by the town manager on the 
recommendation of the visitor service board, subject to 
compliance with applicable procurement laws of the 
commonwealth. 



204 



UNDER ARTICLE 18 Mary Franz of the School 
Committee moved that the Town vote to accept the 
provisions of Section 83 of Chapter 71 of the Acts of 
1993, as amended, known as the "Education Reform Act 
of 1993" to provide for an Early Retirement Incentive 
Program for the members of the Massachusetts Teacher's 
Retirement System employed by the Chelmsford Public 
Schools, with said program to include a five year 
additional credit for age, service, or a combination 
thereof and limited to 7 members who have met 
application requirements. 

Robert Cruickshank, Business Manager for the School 
Department presented the article. This is a portion of the 
Education Reform Act that was passed by Legislation in 
1993 and the Town had two years to accept it. It was 
withdrawn last year, and now has come before the body 
for approval. In the long run it would save the Town 
some money and keep teachers who may be laid off next 
year. Originally thirty people had applied for the early 
retirement. However, due to the extreme high cost, only 
seven people will be allowed to take advantage of the it. 
The potential retiree must have twenty years or more 
service with the system. They would be allowed to add 
time to either their years of service, or to their age, or 
combination of both. The potential retirees are chosen by 
certain application requirements. The state will make the 
final choice based on a state wide eligibility list. The 
state contributes half the cost of the retirement incentive. 
The estimated cost to the Town would be $32,000. over 
15 years, for a total cost of $485,000. Teachers pay their 
own retirement. The Town does not contribute any 
monies. The Representatives asked many questions. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. A majority 
of the Board of Selectmen recommended the article. A 
lengthy discussion took place. Ed Cady, Leonard Doolan 
spoke against the article. Sam Poulten spoke in favor. 
Brad Emerson moved the question. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the article, 
which left the Chair in doubt. The Moderator asked for 
the following tellers to come forward and take a hand 



205 



count: Dorothy Frawley, Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, 
Jean Horgan. Michael Sokol called for a roll call vote. 
The Moderator explained that 40 or more representatives 
in favor are needed in order to have a roll call vote. He 
asked for a show of hands of those in favor of having a 
roll call. Result of the hand count was 72, a roll call vote 
was conducted. 

The Moderator went over the procedure for 
conducting a roll call vote. The Town Clerk would call 
every name in each precinct and the representative would 
register a yea or a nea, or abstain. It was decided that yea 
or nea sounded to similar, therefore the response is to be 
yes or no. Mary St. Hilaire, began reading the names of 
the Representatives in precinct 1 through precinct 9, and 
she asked that when a representative's name was called, 
to stand and say their vote. This procedure took between 
15 to 20 minutes. 162 names were called and recorded. 
The Moderator then allowed a one time chance for any 
representative to change their vote. One representative 
did change from a yes to a no. The total count was: Yes 
92, No 43, 27 absent/abstain, the motion carried. Note: 
The actual results are on file in the Town Clerk's Office. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 Selectman Robert Joyce 
moved that the Town vote to accept the following 
mentioned streets, as laid out by the Board of Selectmen 
and shown by their reports duly filed in the office of the 
Town Engineer: 

1. KelshillRoad 

2. Rhum Circle 

3. Minuteman Drive 

4. Doris Drive 

5. Shedd Lane Station 15+25.67 to station 26+59.0 

6. McHugh Farm Lane 

7. Waterford Place 8+29.67 to station 16+12.85 

Providing all the construction of the same meets with the 
requirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to 
the withholding of any remaining bonds until such 
requirements have been met; and to see if the Town will 



206 



vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire any 
and all temporary and/or permanent easements, and any 
property in fee simple, with trees thereon, by purchase, 
eminent domain, or otherwise, for the purpose of 
securing traffic safety and road improvements, and to see 
if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$7.00 to defray all necessary costs, fees and expenses in 
connection with the acquisition of said land and for 
paying any damages which may be awarded as a result of 
any such taking; and to see if the Town will vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen to negotiate and execute 
all necessary and proper contracts and agreements thereto. 

James Pearson, Director of the DPW and Town 
Engineer explained the article. This is a yearly article 
and these streets have meet the Town's building 
requirements and the Town is ready to accept them. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 20 Town Manager Bernard F. 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to transfer and 
appropriate from available funds or transfer and 
appropriate from the 1991 transportation Bond Issue as 
set forth in Chapter 33 of the Acts of 1991, a certain sum 
of money for the purpose of Chapter 90 expenditures. 

The Town Manager moved to dismiss this article. The 
Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen were in 
favor of dismissal. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21 Town Manager Bernard F. 
Lynch, moved that the Town vote to transfer the sum of 
$12,500, from the sale of the Graves and Lots to the 
Cemetery Improvement and Development Fund. 

The Finance supported the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



207 



UNDER ARTICLE 22 Town Manager Bernard F. 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
or transfer from available funds a certain sum of money 
with which to meet bills from previous years. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved to dismiss the 
article. The Finance Committee and the Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of dismissal. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 23 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved to dismiss the article. The Finance 
Committee and the Board of Selectmen were in favor of 
dismissal. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
Motion carried, unanimously. For the record the article 
was as follows: That the . Town vote to accept the 
provisions of Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 44, 
Section 53 D "Recreation and Park Self-Supporting 
Service Revolving Funds". 

UNDER ARTICLE 24 Selectman Robert Joyce 
moved to amend the figure to be $1,000. instead of 
$2,000. The Finance Committee was in favor. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to 
amend, motion carried. He then asked for a show of 
hands on the article as amended, motion carried, 
unanimously. The article reads as follows: 

Bernard Lynch, Town Manager, moved that the Town 
vote to transfer the sum of $1,000 from Conservation fees 
under Wetlands Special Reserve Fund to reduce the 
Conservation Commission Budget Fiscal Year 1995. 

UNDER ARTICLE 25 Chairman of the Sewer 
Commission John Emerson Jr moved that the Town vote 
to transfer $1,000,000.00 from Sewer Betterments, 
Special Revenue, to reduce the exempt portion of debt 
and interest in the Fiscal Year 1995 Budget. 



208 



The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee 
recommendation. The Finance Committee recommended 
the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands on 
the article, Motion carried, unanimously. 

Steve Mallette moved to adjourn the meeting until 
Monday May 9, 1994. Due to the next article being the 
budget he felt that the discussion would be lengthy. The 
Finance Committee was against the motion, because there 
were other articles that could be taken up if so desired. 
Selectman Robert Joyce moved to postpone the article 
until the conclusion of article 30. Steve Mallette 
withdrew his motion to adjourn. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands on the motion to postpone article 26, 
motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 27 Town Manager Bernard F. 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $20,000. for the purpose of funding the sand 
lease approved by the Town under Article 12 of the 1989 
Annual Town Meeting. 

Bernard Lynch explained that this is a yearly item and 
asked for support of the article. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen 
recommended the article. The Moderator asked for a 
vote by way of a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 28 Town Manager Bernard F. 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum $19,000.00 to engage a private accounting firm 
to prepare an audit of all accounts in all departments in 
the Town of Chelmsford. 

The Finance Committee and Board of Selectmen 
supported the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by 
way of a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



209 



UNDER ARTICLE 29 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $150,000.00 to be used as a Reserve Fund at 
the discretion of the Finance Committee, as provided in 
General Laws Chapter 40, Section 6. 

James Sousa questioned if this should be acted upon 
after the budget. Bernard Lynch said this wasn't 
necessary and it could be vote at this time. The Finance 
Committee recommended the article. The Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 30 moved that the Town vote to 
appropriate the sum of $867,000.00 for the following 
capital projects: 



DEPARTMENT ITEM 


BUDGET 


Police 


Four (4) Cruisers 


$ 65,000.00 


School 


Auditorium Remodeling 


$ 30,000.00 


Dept. 


Baseball Field Fencing 


$ 15,000.00 




Water Back-flow Prevention 


$ 12,000.00 




Fire Alarm & Fire Doors 


$ 30,000.00 




Handicap Access 


$ 25,000.00 




Central Office Main Computer 


$150,000.00 




Computer Lab Middle School 


$ 50,000.00 




Lockers McCarthy 


$ 15,000.00 




Floor McCarthy 


$ 40,000.00 




HVAC Replacement 


$ 30,000.00 




Library Furniture 


$ 15,000.00 


Data 


Equipment & Software 


$100,000.00 


Processing 




D.P.W. 


Road Maintenance 


$200,000.00 




Dump truck with Sander 


$ 60,000.00 




One Ton Truck Parks Dept 


$ 30.000.00 




TOTAL 


$867,000.00 



210 



and to borrow the sum of $842,000.00 and transfer the 
sum of $25,000.00 from unexpended bond funds as 
follows: Article 13 of the Annual Town Meeting of 1988 
the sum of $16,000.00; Article 16 of the Annual Town 
Meeting of 1992 the sum of $4,268.00; and Article 28 of 
the Annual Town Meeting of 1993 the sum of $4,732.00 
to fund these obligations. 

The Town Meeting Representatives asked 
questions about the items shown. The Finance 
Committee was in favor of the article. The Selectmen 
were in favor of the article. The Moderator asked for a 
vote on the article by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

Selectman Robert Joyce moved to adjourn the meeting 
until Monday May 9, 1994 at 7:30 PM at the Senior 
Center. Motion carried, unanimously. The meeting 
adjourned at 10:20 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Moderator Town Clerk 



211 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL 

TOWN MEETING 

MAY 9, 1994 

The Adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at the Senior Center by the Moderator Dennis E. 
McHugh at 7:40 PM, who recognized the presence of a 
quorum. There were 146 Town Meeting Representatives 
present. 

The Moderator asked for Precinct One 
Representatives to gather and elect one person to go on 
the Voting Procedure Committee that was established 
under article 16 at the May 2, 1994 Town Meeting. Due 
to not enough representatives being present on May 5th, 
the Moderator made this the first order of business. 
Sandra Kilburn was elected and her name was added to 
the Committee. 

UNDER ARTICLE 26 Town Manager, Bernard 
Lynch explained that there were changes in some of the 
figures and asked that the Representatives note the 
changes. The School Budget's total figure is to be 
$26,069,040.00, instead of $25,869,040.00. Under 
Public Safety, due to the elimination of the Public Safety 
Director position, Personnel Services should be 
$5,187,180. instead of $5,257,180. Under the Sewer 
Division section within the Public Works budget, Offset 
Receipts should be $520,000, instead of $490,000. 
Under Cemetery Department, Expenses, the figure is 
$12,324 from $25,865. The Commissioners agreed to 
supplement the account from their special accounts. He 
then went on with a presentation of the budget. He went 
over the budget process, discussed the revenue and 
expenditure highlights, and concluded with a discussion 
on the trends and spending analysis. Dr Moser, 
Superintendent of Schools came forward and presented 
the School Committee's budget request. The presentation 
consisted of three budgets, and what could be achieved or 
maintained under them. Even though the Town Manager 
has increased the School's budget, Dr Moser felt that an 
additional $100,000. was still needed. The Moderator 



212 



asked if there were any questions, hearing none he went 
on and explained the procedure he was going to use 
concerning the budget. He would read the total figure in 
the grey area of the budget book, then proceeded to read 
the figures within the budget, asking if there was any 
need for discussion or questions. One vote will be taken 
at the conclusion which will be the total money needed to 
be raised and appropriated. 

The Moderator began reading the individual lines and 
figures under Municipal Administration at the Law 
Department a discussion took place. William Dalton 
wanted to know what the expense figure was for. The 
Town Manager explained that this money is used during 
negotiations. The Moderator continued to read through 
the budget asking for any discussion. At the School 
Department a discussion took place. Michael Bahia cited 
personal reasons why he felt that the School was not as 
efficient as it should be. Kit Harbison asked if the figures 
that were presented for enrollment included any new 
children coming from proposed developments within the 
Town? Dr Moser said that they did not. She then 
questioned if all the free cash was gone? Town Manger 
Bernard Lynch said that it was. She wanted to know 
what would happen if the budget passed unbalanced (this 
would happen if the School's budget was increased by 
$100,000). The Town Manager advised against doing 
this. However, if that is how the Representatives vote 
then the money will have to be raised somehow before the 
tax rate is set. John Carson asked where the money 
would come from. Either by way of an over-ride or 
within the Town's side of the budget. John Carson then 
moved that the School Departments budget figure be 
increased by $100,000 for a total figure of 
$26,169,040.00. Selectman Blomgren stated if given ten 
minutes that perhaps the Manager could find the money 
within the present budget. Town Manager Bernard Lynch 
explained that this is not so. The budget process is done 
over the course of many months and $100,000. can not 
be easily found without causing problems within the 
individual departmental budgets. The Moderator asked 
for the Finance Committee's recommendation on the 



213 



motion. Chairman Dwight Hayward said that the 
members present voted two in favor, two against, and two 
abstained, therefor not recommendation could be made. 
The Board of Selectmen were not in favor. A discussion 
took place. Glen Thoren said that the School Department 
needed to have a five year plan, he supported the motion 
to amend. John Emerson spoke against the motion. It 
isn't right to take $100,000. from the municipal side, 
he'd rather see an over-ride. Tom Moran spoke against 
the motion. He reminded the Representatives that when 
he tried to re-open the West Fire Station, he had to show 
where the money would come from within the budget. 
Barry Balan spoke against the motion. Selectman Jeffrey 
Brem explained that the preparing of the budget is a long 
lengthy process, and asked that an unbalanced budget not 
be voted. Michael Sokol asked if the teacher's salaries 
could be frozen. Dr Moser explained that non-union 
personnel already are, however it would require re- 
negotiating the contracts. He was against the motion. 
Janet Dubner questioned if the money could come from 
the other departments? The Town Manager said that if 
the Representatives wanted an unbalanced budget then 
vote it and the problem will be addressed in the fall. Carl 
Olsson, Chairman of the School Committee expressed 
that it would not be fair for the students or staff if a 
budget is not agreed on prior to the fall. It would be 
better to know what the actual figure was going be to 
work with as soon as possible. Michael Sokol moved the 
question. The Moderator asked for a show of hands, 
which left the Chair in doubt. The following tellers came 
forward and a hand count was taken: Dorothy Frawley, 
Patricia Plank, Lucy Simonian, Jean Horgan. The result 
Yes 126 No 11 2/3' s is 91 motion carried to stop debate. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands on John 
Carson's motion, motion defeated. Barry Balan then 
made a motion to end debate and take a vote on the entire 
budget with a R & A figure of $48,855,485. The 
Moderator asked for the teller's to come forward. A 
discussion followed, Barry Balan withdrew his motion. 
Cheryl Warshafsky questioned why teacher positions have 
to be cut, it should be in administration. The Moderator 
continued reading the budget, under Public Safety a 



214 



discussion took place. Dennis Ready question now that 
there is no Public Safety Director and no Deputy Chiefs, 
who will pick up the responsibility. Selectman Blomgren 
explained that the position has been delayed at this time 
and will be examined more closely. Thomas Moran 
questioned if the present budget can handle all Fire 
Stations being opened. The Town Manager explained 
that all five stations will remained open. Jeff Stallard 
question the Police personnel situation. Chief Caron 
explained that three police graduates will be assigned to 
regular patrol as so as possible, thus three more detectives 
will be able to go back to their work. Kathleen Redican 
questioned the money under personnel, does this included 
union raises or would more money be needed. The Town 
Manager said that it's been three years since a increase, 
he may have to come back at a future town meeting 
requesting more money. Tom Moran questioned if all the 
fire stations will be manned? The Town Manager 
explained that periodically one may have to shut down 
due to lack of manning a station, but all stations are to 
remain open. The Moderator continued reading the 
budget, under the Sewer Division of the Public Works 
budget a questioned was raised and answered concerning 
the expenses. The Moderator continued under the 
Community Services the Veteran's Agent, Cheryl 
Warshafsky questioned if the present agent's salary is 
more than what was advertised? The Town Manager was 
not aware of any difference. The Moderator continued 
reading. Under Undistributed Expenses Leonard Doolan 
questioned what was Chapter 32B Insurance. The Town 
Manager said that this is the employee's health insurance. 
John Coppinger questioned what was "out of state" line 
items that appeared in certain budgets. The Town 
Manager explained that this is money used for travel for 
conferences by the department heads. The Moderator 
read the figure of $50,376,485.00 as the gross operating 
budget. He then minus from that $1,000,000. the Sewer 
Betterment Revenue, under article 25, then $520,000. 
which is the Sewer Offset Receipts, and $1000.00 from 
article 24, the Conservation Reserve Fund, for a total 
raise and appropriate figure of $48,855,485. The 



215 



Finance Committee supported the article. The Board of 
Selectmen were in favor of the article. The Moderator 
asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, motion 
carried. The budget is as follows: 

Town Manager Bernard F. Lynch moved that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$48,855,485.00 to defray Town charges for the fiscal 
period July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995. 

MUNICIPAL ADMINISTRATION 

1. Personnel Services $ 983,773. 

2. Expense 387,277. 

3. Out of State 4,500. 

4. Outlay 2,000. 

5. Legal Services .. 20.000. 
TOTAL $ 1,397,550. 

EDUCATION 

CHELMSFORD SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

6. Total Budget $26,069,040. 

NASHOBA VALLEY TECH HIGH SCHOOL 

7. Total Budget $ 590,222. 

PUBLIC SAFETY 

8. Personnel Services $ 5,187,180. 

9. Expense 454,493. 

10. Out of State 3,600. 

11. Outlay 25.500. 
TOTAL $ 5,670,773 

PUBLIC WORKS 

12. Personnel Services $ 1,051,867. 

13. Expense 2,664,407. 

14. Out of State 1,500. 

15. Outlay 0. 

16. Snow and Ice 350.000. 
TOTAL $ 4,067,774. 



216 



SEWER COMMISSION 

17. Expense $ 15,000. 

18. Out of State 2.000. 
TOTAL $ 17,000. 

CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

19. Personnel Services $ 158,304. 

20. Expense 12,325. 

21. Out of State 500. 

22. Outlay 4.000. 
TOTAL $ 175,129. 

COMMUNITY SERVICES 

23. Personnel Services $ 323,408. 

24. Expense 133.337. 
TOTAL $ 456,745. 

LIBRARY 

25. Personnel Services $ 571,508. 

26. Expense 204,879. 

27. Out of State 1.000. 
TOTAL $ 777,387. 

UNDISTRIBUTED EXPENSES 

28. TOTAL $ 5,347,957. 
DEBT & INTEREST 

29. Principal $ 3,833,142. 

30. Interest $ 1,973,766. 
TOTAL $ 5,806,908. 



217 



GROSS OPERATING BUDGET $50,376,485. 

(art 25) Sewer Betterments - 1,000,000. 

Sewer Offset Rec - 520,000. 

(art 24) Conservation Rev - 1.000. 

TOTAL R & A $48,855,485. 



UNDER ARTICLE 31 Selectman Robert Joyce 
moved that the Town vote to instruct the Board of 
Assessors to issue a certain amount of money from Free 
Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained that there 
was no free cash and moved for dismissal. The Finance 
Committee supported the motion to dismiss. The Board 
of Selectmen supported the motion. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, motion carried. 

Selectman Robert Joyce asked for a show of hands of 
the Town Meeting Representatives who were in favor of 
returning to the Senior Center for future meetings. A 
favorable showing was the response. 

John Emerson moved to adjourn the meeting sine die. 
Motion carried, unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 
10:55 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Mary E. St.Hilaire, 

Moderator Town Clerk 



218 






TOWN WARRANT FOR STATE 
PRIMARY ELECTION 
SEPTEMBER 20, 1994 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable of the Town of Chelmsford: 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the Inhabitants of said Town 
who are qualified to vote in Primaries to vote at: 

Precinct 1: 

Town Offices Gymnasium, 50 Billerica Road 

Precinct 2: 

Harrington School Gymnasium, 120 Richardson 
Road 

Precinct 3: 

Harrington School Gymnasium, 120 Richardson 
Road 

Precinct 4: 

Westlands School Cafeteria, 170 Dalton Road 

Precinct 5: 

Byam School Cafeteria, 25 Maple Road 

Precinct 6: 

Westlands School Cafeteria, 170 Dalton Road 

Precinct 7: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium, 
250 North Road 

Precinct 8: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium, 
250 North Road 



219 



Precinct 9: 

Town Offices Gymnasium, 50 Billerica Road 

On Tuesday, the twentieth day of September, 1994 from 
7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose. 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the candidates 
of political parties for the following offices: 

U.S. SENATOR 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
GOVERNOR 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
LT. GOVERNOR 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
SECRETARY 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
TREASURER 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
AUDITOR 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

Fifth Congressional District 
COUNCILLOR 

Third Councillor District 
SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

Fifth Middlesex Senatorial District 
REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

16th Middlesex Representative District 
DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

Northern District 
CLERK OF COURTS 

Middlesex County 
REGISTER OF DEEDS 

Middlesex Northern District 
COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

Middlesex County 

For complete warrant information see original 
documents on file in the Town Clerk's Office. 



220 



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228 



WARRANT FOR 

FALL ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

OCTOBER 17, 1994 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the town meeting 
representatives of said Chelmsford to meet in the Senior 
Center, Groton Road, North Chelmsford, on Monday, the 
seventeenth day of October, at 7:30 p.m. o'clock in the 
evening, then and there to act upon the following articles, 
VIZ: 

For complete warrant information see original 
documents on file in the Town Clerk's Office. 



229 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
OCTOBER 17, 1994 



The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the 
Senior Center at 7:40 PM by the Moderator Dennis E. 
McHugh, who recognized the presence of a quorum. 
There were 148 Town Meeting Representatives present. 

The Moderator went over and explained the Town 
Meeting procedures, and pointed out the emergency exits 
located within the hall. 

The Moderator asked for a moment of silence for two 
people who have recently passed away who were active in 
the Town. Patrick Murtagh, Head Custodian at the Town 
Office Building, and Matthew Whiting who had 
participated in various Town and State elections. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Roger Blomgren 
moved that the Town vote to hear reports of the Town 
Officers and Committees. 

The Town Moderator explained that at the Spring 
meeting a committee was formed under article 16 called 
the Voting Procedural Committee and it was to meet and 
give a report at this meeting. Due to communication and 
scheduling problems between the Moderator and the 
Committee, no meetings have taken place as of yet. He 
apologized for this and requested that all the members 
meet at the end of tonight's meeting and decided on when 
the Committee will meet in order to begin discussions. 

Roger Blomgren, Chairman of the Board of 
Selectman, asked that the Town Meeting Body listen to 
the following speakers concerning the closing of Hanscom 
Air Force Base. The base is located in the neighboring 
town of Bedford and the impact of the closing is going to 
greatly effect Chelmsford economically. 



230 



Mark Provost, Director of Team Hanscom came 
forward and provided information. He explained that the 
base does not deal with airplanes anymore, it is 
responsible for major technology in the fields of medicine 
and science. He explained that there are 551 employees 
from Bedford that live in Chelmsford. They pay real 
estate taxes and support the local businesses with their 
salaries. He urged that people contact the Federal 
Senator and Congressman of this district and make them 
aware of the financial impact this will have on the voters 
in this district. Richard Galloway of Team Hanscom, 
asked if there were any questions at this time, hearing 
none he thanked the body for their time. 

Upon hearing no further reports the Moderator moved 
on. 

Selectman Roger Blomgren moved the reading of the 
Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously, by a 
show of hands. Selectman Blomgren moved that the 
reading of the warrant be waived. It was so voted 
unanimously, by a show of hands. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 John Emerson, Chairman of 
the Sewer Commission, moved that the Town vote to 
authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Sewer 
Commissioners to acquire any and all temporary and/or 
permanent easements, and any property in fee simple with 
the buildings and trees thereon by purchase, eminent 
domain, or otherwise, for the property located in the 
Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, and further 
described and shown on a set of plans entitled "Plan of 
Sewer Easement in Chelmsford, Massachusetts, Freeman 
Lake Area Lateral Sewers October 1994, prepared for the 
Chelmsford Sewer Commission by Richard F. Kaminski 
& Associates, Inc." a copy of which is on file in the 
Office of the Town Engineer and is incorporated herein 
by reference, for the purpose of constructing and 
maintaining sewers, pumping stations, and all other 
appurtenances thereto. 



231 



John Emerson, Chairman of the Sewer Commission 
explained that this was a standard article. It was slated to 
be done six years ago with a agreement by the Town of 
Westford who has chosen not to continue negotiations. 
This project will begin in the Spring. It will include the 
Scotty Hollow Condominiums, due to the number of units 
in the complex the fees collected for the project will 
enable a bigger area then originally intended to be 
sewered. The Finance Committee and the Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Roger Blomgren 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 
30B, for consideration to be determined, all right, title 
and interest, if any held by the Town, in a certain parcel 
of land on Fourth Avenue, shown as Lots 1 1 and 12 on 
Assessor's Map 67, containing 9,720 square feet and 
4,860 square feet more or less respectively and more fully 
described in the Final Judgement of the Land Court dated 
August 24, 1992 and recorded in the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 6218, Page 64 and 
deed recorded in Book 2153, Page 301. 

Bernard Lynch, Town Manager explained that these 
lots have an assessed value of $3,300.00, and $3,700.00. 
The direct abutter's were interested. According to the 
Building Inspector and Conservation Commission they 
were not buildable lots. Tom Christiano asked what was 
then the interest. The Town Manager explained that the 
abutter would like to be able to increase the size of his 
lot. The Finance Committee recommended the article. 
The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Roger Blomgren 
moved that the Town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 
30B, for consideration to be determined, all right, title 
and interest, if any held by the town in a certain parcel of 



232 



land off Twelfth Street, shown as Lots 13 and 16 on 
Assessor's Map 62, containing 6,400 square feet and 
4,020 square feet more or less respectively and more fully 
described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in book 2153, Page 300 and 
Book 2153, Page 301. 

Bernard Lynch, Town Manager explained that 
abutters who own all the property surrounding the lot 
expressed an interest in the lot. They are assessed at 
$3,500.00 and $3,100.00, which is what he would 
recommend as the minimum bid to be. Just like the 
preceding article these are non buildable lots. The 
Finance Committee recommended the article. The Board 
of Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Selectman Roger Blomgren 
moved that the town vote to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to convey in accordance with M.G.L. Chapter 
30B, for consideration to be determined, all right, title 
and interest, if any held by the Town, in a certain parcel 
of land off Groton Road, shown as Lots 35 and 36 on 
Assessor's Map 195, containing 17,800 square feet and 
2.11 acres more or less respectively and more fully 
described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex North 
District Registry of Deeds in Book 2153, Page 302. 

The Town Manager explained that the lots are land 
locked and have an assessed value of $1,900.00 and 
$1,800.00. The Finance Committee and the Board of 
Selectmen recommended the article. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Martin A. Gruber moved that 
the Town vote to amend the General Bylaws Article VI 
Police Regulations by adding the following: 



233 



Section 24 Safety Reflectors 

No person shall walk, run, jog or ride a bicycle 
without having reflectors on their shoes, sneakers or outer 
wear, when on public ways, streets and sidewalks in the 
Town from dusk to dawn. 

Martin Gruber spoke about the article. His intent was 
not to take any rights away from anyone, or create 
revenues from fines. He just wanted to establish public 
awareness and common sense regarding safety. A 
number of questions and concerns were expressed. Scott 
Ubele of the Police Department's Traffic and Safety 
Division, explained that the concept was a good idea, 
however the enforcement was not possible. There is a 
need to make the public aware of the issue and should be 
address. The Finance Committee does not recommend 
the article due to it not being enforceable. The majority 
of the Board of Selectmen recommended the article. John 
Emerson moved to dismiss the article and the Police 
Department make recommendations to the proponent as to 
future action on this proposal. The Finance Committee 
recommended the motion to dismiss. A majority of the 
Board of Selectmen were in favor of the motion. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch, explained that there are major intersections in the 
Town that have shrubs, plantings, fences, etc planted to 
close to the roadways. This results in poor visibility. 
This by-law would address this issue. Other surrounding 
town's have similar by-laws. The Traffic and Safety 
Committee recommended the by-law. Dean Carmeris 
questioned if there is a grandfather clause, who would 
decide that the object should be removed and would there 
be an appeal process. Jim Pearson, Director of the DPW 
and member of the Traffic and Safety Committee, 
explained that the Board of Selectmen and the Traffic and 
Safety Committee would view the site and decide if the 
area in question was a potential hazard and make 
recommendations. Dean Carmeris felt that individual 
cases shouldn't be determined unless a grandfather clause 



234 



be included in the law. A discussion took place. 
Concerns were raised about driveways and fences on 
property which abut public ways. It was explained that 
this issue only pertained to intersection. Michael Sokol 
asked how this could be enforced if there was no 
grandfather clause. Town Counsel James Harrington 
stated that the by-law would be enforceable. Matthew 
Doyle expressed that the article should be re-written and 
include more details. He moved to dismiss the article. 
Selectman Peter Lawlor the Selectmen's Representative to 
the Traffic and Safety Committee asked that the article 
not be dismissed. He cited that the Board is responsible 
for the safety of the Town and it should be voted. The 
Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation on dismissing the article. The Finance 
Committee was against dismissing the article. The Board 
of Selectmen were against dismissing the article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to 
dismiss. This left the Chair in doubt. The following 
tellers came forward and a hand count was taken: 

Patricia Plank, Dorothy Frawley, Jean Horgan, Lucy 
Simonian. The results of the motion to dismiss: Yes 52 
No 79. Motion defeated, the discussion continued. Susan 
Gates proposed that the following wording be added to 
the end of paragraph one: 

Buildings existing as of October 17, 1994 are exempt 
from this by-law. 

The Finance Committee does not support the 
motion to amend. The Board of Selectmen support the 
motion to amend. More discussion took place. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to 
amend. Motion carried. Dean Carmaris spoke against 
the main motion as amended. He felt that even with this 
amendment there is still no actual grandfather clause and 
no process for appeal. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands on the main motion as amended. This left the 
Chair in doubt. The tellers came forward and a hand 
count was conducted. Results Yes 99 No 35 motion 
carried. The article reads as follows: 



235 



Selectman Roger Blomgren moved that the Town vote 
to amend the General By-laws ARTICLE V Streets and 
Sidewalks by adding the following Section 22 Corner 
Clearance: 

Section 22 Corner Clearance 

1. No person owning, possessing or having under his 
control any real estate abutting any intersection of 
streets, shall erect, place, plant or permit or suffer the 
erection, placing or planting or maintenance of 
anything in such a manner that it shall impact safety 
by materially impeding the vision of operators of 
motor vehicles between a height of two and one half 
(2 1/2) and ten (10) feet above the grades of the 
intersecting streets in the area bounded by the street 
lines of said real estate and a line joining points thirty 
(30) feet along said street lines from the point of 
intersection of said street lines. Buildings existing as 
of October 17, 1994 are exempt from this by-law. 

2. Any person who violates this provision and after 
being notified of violation by the Board of Selectmen 
in writing, permits said violation to continue for 30 
days after receipt of notice, may be punished by a fine 
of not more than fifty dollars ($50.00) For the 
purposes of this section, each successive day during 
which any violation is committed or continued shall 
be deemed a separate offense. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8 Selectman Roger Blomgren 
moved that the Town vote to enter into a cooperation 
agreement pursuant to M.G.L. Chapter 166 Section 22E 
with the utility company for the removal and replacement 
of facilities by the Municipality to facilitate the 
depression of overhead utilities in the Center Area and 
further described and shown on a set of plans on file in 
the office of the Town Engineer which is incorporated 
herein by reference. 



236 



Selectman Jeffrey Brem explained the article. He 
made a presentation to the body with slides that showed 
the utility poles as seen now and what the area would 
look like after the removal of the poles. The stretch of 
roadway shown is the Gateway to the Center. It is an 
eyesore that should be corrected. It is an investment for 
the future. The Town of Ayer has just done this. The 
Town could work with the utilities now and the cost 
would be 2% over the next five years. This would be 
added to the utilities bills. He cited the examples 
provided by the companies. The average monthly electric 
bill is $60.00 and phone bill is $30.00, the total cost is 
$90.00 per household. Which would be a average 
increase of $2.00 per month to pay for the project. A 
lengthy discussion took place. Many Representatives 
spoke in favor and against the article. They cited more 
important priorities that needed to be addressed at this 
time, However, many felt that this was an important issue 
that needed to be addressed now while cost factor 
co-operation was available from the utility companies. 
The Finance Committee was not in favor of the article. 
They felt that the over all cost did not merit the actual 
pay back to the town. The majority of the Board of 
Selectmen were not in favor of the article. It was 
suggested that perhaps a future non-binding question 
could be put before the town. John Emerson moved the 
question to stop debate. Motion carried unanimously, by 
a show of hands. The Moderator asked for a show of 
hands on the article, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9 Selectman Roger Blomgren 
moved to amend the General By-laws V Streets and 
Sidewalks Section 29 Pond Street Closing by deleting 
Section 29 which reads as follows: 

Section 29 Pond Street Closing 

1. Pond Street in South Chelmsford shall be closed to 
vehicular traffic from Parkerville Road to a point 
twenty-five (25) feet northerly from the boundary line 



237 



dividing the property of one Blaisdell and the South 
Chelmsford Village Improvement Association 
property, from June 15 to September 15, yearly. 

2. Signs warning all persons of the provisions of this 
By- Law shall be erected at the intersection of Pond 
Street and Parkerville Road and a point twenty-five 
(25) feet northerly from the boundary line dividing the 
property of one Blaisdell and the South Chelmsford 
Improvement Association property. 

3. Any violation of the by-law shall be punished by a 
fine or not more than twenty Dollars ($20.00) for 
each offense. 

And substitute the following Section 29 Pond Street 
Closing 



1. Pond Street shall be closed to vehicular traffic from 
Parkerville Road to a point twenty-five (25) feet 
northerly from the boundary line dividing the property 
of one Blaisdell and the South Chelmsford Village 
Improvement Association property. 

2. Signs warning all persons of the provisions of this 
By-Law shall be erected and Town maintained at the 
intersection of Pond Street and Parkerville Road and a 
point twenty-five (25) feet northerly from the 
boundary line dividing the property of one Blaisdell 
and the South Chelmsford Improvement Association 
property. 

Selectman Roger Blomgren moved to dismiss the 
article. He explained that no representative from the 
South Chelmsford Village Association was available to 
address the article at this time. The Finance Committee 
was in favor of the motion to dismiss. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands on the motion. Motion carried 
unanimously. 



238 



UNDER ARTICLE 10 Selectman William Dalton 
explained the article. He had been asked to bring this 
article to the body because the present zoning by-law does 
not allow revolving barber poles. The barber pole is the 
symbol of barbers and traditionally it was always a 
moving, rotating pole. This would be the only 
amendment to the by-law. He stated that the Sign 
Advisory Committee was in favor of the article, and that 
the Planning Board supported the article as long as they 
could recommend one amendment to the article. 
Selectman Dalton presented the amendment. At the end 
of the first sentence, after the word pillars the following 
wording be added: 

That only registered and licensed barber shops be 
allowed to display a barber pole and that the barber pole 
not exceed 18" in height. 

The Finance Committee did not recommend the article. 
The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 

James Good, Chairman of the Planning Board came 
forth and read the Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board held a public hearing on October 
12, 1994 on the above mentioned article after advertising 
a legal notice in the Chelmsford Independent on 
September 22nd and 29th, 1994 a minimum of 14 days 
before the hearing. A copy of the ad was sent to all 
abutting towns and the appropriated agencies, as required 
in the Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 
5. At that meeting, the proponents, residents and the 
Planning Board discussed the merits of this zoning by-law 
change. The Planning Board voted (4-1) to recommend 
an amendment to the Town of Chelmsford Zoning By- 
laws under ARTICLE III, GENERAL REGULATIONS, 
section 3314 (a) prohibitions, to include the phrase 
"except for traditional illuminated barbershop poles with 
revolving pillars". They have made this 

recommendation contingent upon the inclusion of the 



239 



phrase "exclusive to registered Barbers" to be added at 
the end of the sentence and that the applicant present a 
favorable letter from the Sign Advisory Committee. 

The Moderator asked for a show of hands on the 
motion to amend, motion carried, unanimously. The 
Moderator then asked for a show of hands on the main 
motion as amended. This left the Chair in doubt. The 
tellers came forward and a hand count was taken: Yes 
114 No 10 2/3' s is 82 the motion carried and the article 
reads as follows: 

William Dalton moved that the Town vote to amend the 
Zoning By-law under III GENERAL REGULATIONS 
SECTION 3314 (a) Prohibition as follows: 

Delete the existing Section 3314 (a) Prohibitions as 
follows: 

(a) No moving, animated, revolving, moving light, or 
flashing sign or sign elements shall be permitted. No 
pennants, streamers, advertising flags, spinners, or 
similar devices shall be permitted. 

And substitute the following Section 3314 (a) 

(a) No moving, animated, revolving, moving light, or 
flashing sign or sign elements shall be permitted, 
except for traditional illuminated barber shop poles 
with revolving pillars. That only registered and 
licensed barber shops be allowed to display a barber 
pole and that the barber pole not exceed 18" in height. 
No pennants, streamers, advertising flags, spinners, 
or similar devices shall be permitted. 

The Moderator made a point of order. He had a 
conflict with the following article and was stepping down 
as Moderator at this time. Town Counsel James 
Harrington would preside over the meeting during this 
article. 



240 



UNDER ARTICLE 11 Attorney James Geary 
representing the Radisson Hotel explained that the Hotel 
would like to be able to offer rental of vehicles. Due to 
their building being in the CD district zone, this use is 
not allowed. This use is allowed in the CB and the other 
hotel located in town is in this zone. His clients wanted to 
be compatible with their competition. There was a 
separate building located on the lot which would house 
the operation. A discussion took place regarding the 
parking and the amount of the vehicles this would entail. 
Attorney Geary said that there would be twenty-two cars 
and five trucks. The excise tax would be payable to the 
Town of Chelmsford. John Wilder questioned how it was 
done in the past. Attorney Geary explained that there 
was an office located in the Hotel whose service was 
offered only to patrons of the Hotel. Now the Hotel 
wants to extend the service which would go beyond the 
requirements of the zoning law, which is why this article 
is before the body. The Finance Committee 
recommended the article. The Board of Selectmen could 
not recommend due to having a 2-2 vote. 

James Good of the Planning Board came forward and 
read the Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board held a public hearing on 
September 28 1994 on the above mentioned article after 
advertising a legal notice in the Chelmsford Independent 
on September 1st and 8th, 1994, which meets the 
minimum of 14 days before the hearing. A copy of the 
ad was sent to all abutting towns and the appropriated 
agencies, as required in the Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 40 A, Section 5. At that meeting, the proponents, 
residents and the Planning Board discussed the merits of 
this zoning by-law change. It is the opinion of the 
Planning Board that the Motor Vehicle Rental Use as 
described in the legal ad is currently an appropriate and 
an accessory use for the CD zone. Therefore, in keeping 
consistent with the general intent of the Zoning By-laws 
for continuity in the development of the community, The 
Planning Board voted (3-2) to recommend this Zoning 
By-law Change to the Town of Chelmsford. 



241 



David McLachlan asked for defeat of the article. He 
cited creeping of business. Michael Sockol moved the 
question to stop debate. The Acting Moderator asked for 
a show of hands on the motion, motion carried, 
unanimously. The Acting Moderator asked for show of 
hands on the article. This left the Chair in doubt. The 
tellers came forward and a hand count was conducted: 
Yes 95 No 39 2/3' s is 89 motion carried, the article 
reads as follows: 

James Good moved that the Town vote to amend the 
existing Town of Chelmsford Zoning By-laws, Section 
2300 Use -Regulations Schedule - Business Uses - Motor 
Vehicle Rentals - by authorizing such business use in a 
General Commercial District (CD) under a Special Permit 
for exception from the Planning Board as provided for in 
Section 1500. 

Moderator Dennis McHugh returned to the podium. 

Due to a Special Town Meeting already scheduled and 
because of the hour, Selectman Blomgren moved to 
adjourn the meeting to Monday October 24, 1994, 7:30 
PM, at the Senior Center on Groton Road. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. He made a few announcements. He asked 
that the Representatives clean up their tables. Also 
absentee ballots for the November 8th State Election were 
now available in the Town Clerk's Office. Halloween 
Trick and Treat Hours would be Sunday October 30th 
from 5 PM to 8PM. The Town Meeting adjourned at 
10:45 PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Moderator Town Clerk 



242 



WARRANT FOR 

SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

OCTOBER 24, 1994 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford. 

Greetings: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the town meeting 
representatives of said Chelmsford to meet in the Senior 
Center, Groton Road, North Chelmsford, on Monday, the 
twenty-fourth day of October, at 7:30 p.m. o'clock in the 
evening, then and there to act upon the following articles, 
VIZ: 

For complete warrant information see original 
documents on file in the Town Clerk's Office. 



243 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
OCTOBER 24, 1994 



The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at the 
Senior Center at 7:30 PM by the Moderator Dennis E. 
McHugh, who recognized the presence of a quorum. 
There were 142 Town Meeting Representatives present. 
He announced that the Board of Selectmen will hold a 
Tax Classification hearing on November 7th at 7:30 PM 
at the Town Office Building. The Moderator explained 
that there was a Special Town Meeting posted to begin at 
7:30 PM therefore he was going to adjourn the Annual 
Town Meeting at this time and take up the posted Special. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
OCTOBER 24, 1994 



Selectman Roger Blomgren moved the reading of the 
Constable's return of service and the posting of the 
warrant be waived. It was so voted, unanimously, by a 
show of hands. Selectman Blomgren moved that the 
reading of the warrant be waived. It was so voted 
unanimously, by a show of hands. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1 Selectman Roger Blomgren 
moved that the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford 
Home Rule Charter under Part III Elected Town Officers 
Section 3-1 (a) Elective Offices to include Assessor, 
Town Clerk, Treasurer Collector and Board of Appeals. 

Selectman Roger Blomgren explained that a public 
hearing had been held on October 18th concerning the 
proposed charter changes. Since last year a Charter 
review sub committee had been formed. The members 
were Selectman Lawlor and Selectman Joyce, who heard 
suggested charter changes. Some of the areas addressed 
during the meetings were: the loss of balance of power, 
Town Manager to strong, more power should be given to 



244 



the Board of Selectmen and not to the Town Manager, to 
many appointed officials and not enough elected officials, 
one person should not be able to appoint the Finance 
Committee. The following articles are a result of the 
feedback addressed from the sub committee meetings. If 
passed then these articles must be voted on as a ballot 
questions next April. The Board of Selectman worked 
closely with Town Counsel in order to make certain that 
the proposed changes addressed within the articles were 
handled correctly. 

Selectman Blomgren proceeded to explain the purpose 
of article 1. He gave a presentation and explained the 
responsibilities that each position held. The Conservation 
Commission was not to be addressed. This Commission 
must be an appointed Board according to State law. He 
said that as of tonight's meeting the majority of the Board 
of Selectmen recommended the motion due to the 
elimination of the Conservation Commission. He asked if 
there were any questions. Barbara Ward questioned if 
there has been any problems within these positions if not 
then why change the process. Selectman Lawlor 
explained that no problems were cited, just that the 
general conception that elected officials are closer to the 
public than appointed officials. Cheryl Warshafsky 
questioned what if just certain positions could be elected, 
could this be addressed in this article. Town Counsel 
James Harrington explained that there is a motion by 
Glenn Thoren to divide the question. This would allow 
the individual positions to be brought up and voted on 
separately on whether to be appointed or elected. The 
Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee felt that the 
positions should stay appointed by the Manager. The 
majority of the Board of Selectmen were in favor of the 
article. Edward Marshall spoke against the amendment 
and the article. He said that the Town Manager appoints 
these positions subject to the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen. He is accountable to the Board of Selectmen. 
Therefore, he must be allowed to appoint departmental 
heads/managers, which makes him accountable. He is 
responsible for their actions. The ability to get elected 



245 



does not qualify a person for a position. The voter's do 
not necessarily know or understand what specific duties 
or responsibilities are required for a position. He did 
question, however, why the Board of Appeals, which is a 
policy making Board, is not appointed by the Board of 
Selectmen, instead of the Town Manager, regardless it 
definitely shouldn't be an elected board. Glenn Thoren 
explained that the voters should be able to have a choice 
on whether or not these positions should be elected ones. 
John Emerson questioned how could the article be 
dismissed if it was divided. The Moderator explained 
that if that is his intent then he should vote against 
dividing the question. If it passes to divide the question 
then each position would be voted on individually for 
dismissal. The Finance Committee opposes dividing the 
question. The Board of Selectmen are against dismissal 
of the article. The Moderator asked for a show of hands 
on the motion to divide the questions. Motion defeated. 
James Doukszewicz, who was a former elected official 
who became appointed under the Charter and has since 
left to work in the private sector spoke against electing 
these positions, and urged for defeat of the article. Brad 
Emerson moved the question to stop debate. This left the 
Chair in doubt, the following tellers came forward and a 
hand count was taken, Patricia Plank, Dorothy Frawley, 
Jean Horgan, Lucy Simonian. Result of the hand count: 
Yes 111 No 7, 79 is 2/3 's motion carried. The 
Moderator asked for show of hands on the article, motion 
defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2 Selectman Roger Blomgren 
moved that the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford 
Home Rule Charter under Part III, Section 3-2 (c), Board 
of Selectmen Appointment Powers, by deleting the 
following: 

"(c) Appointing Powers 

The Board of Selectmen shall appoint a Town 
Manager, a Town Counsel, a Town Accountant, and a 
Board of Registrars of Voters (but not including the Town 



246 



Clerk). The Board of Selectmen shall also appoint such 
other multiple member bodies as may be provided by 
by-law. " 

and add the following as Part III, Section 3-2 (c): 

"(c) the Board of Selectmen shall appoint a Town 
Manager, a Town Counsel, a Town Accountant, and a 
Board of Registrars of Voters (but not including the 
Town Clerk). The Board of Selectmen shall also 
appoint such policy advisory committees as they deem 
necessary, and such other multiple member bodies as 
may be provided by by-law. " 

Selectman Blomgren explained that presently the Town 
Manager has sole responsibility for appointing all other 
officials and committees except those mentioned above. 
The Manager appoints the committee's who are to advise 
the Board of Selectmen, such as: Solid Waste Advisory, 
Economic Development Advisory, Municipal Building 
Advisory, This is the third time that this has come up. 
Liz Marshall questioned the wording. She said that the 
Selectmen vote whether or not to accept the Town 
Manager's recommendation when an appointment is made 
to a committee. David McLachlan wanted to know what 
this article would accomplish. Selectman Robert Joyce 
explained that the word "policy" is the key word. 
Henrick Johnson spoke against the article. Glenn Thoren 
explained that the Selectmen want the opportunity to be 
able to make their own appointments to a committee that 
is formed to study and advise them on certain issues. 
More discussion took place. Barry Balan questioned if 
multiple committee's will be formed. Barbara Scavezze 
who is presently a member of the Solid Waste Committee 
wanted to know if this was the case, which committee 
would be responsible for reporting information, and then 
who will make the final decision when the time comes. 
The Finance Committee didn't approve of the wording in 
the article. The Board of Selectmen supported the article. 
The Moderator began to ask for a vote by way of a show 
of hands, Jeffrey Stallard requested a roll call vote be 
taken. The by-law requires that 40 Town Meeting 



247 



Representatives must be in favor of conducting a roll call. 
The tellers came forward and a hand count was taken, 76 
Representatives voted in favor. 

The Moderator explained the process that would 
take place. The Town Clerk would read each name 
alphabetically within each of the nine precincts. Mary 
St.Hilaire read each of the 162 Representatives names 
beginning with precinct 1 and recorded their votes as Yes 
No or absent. The process took 15 minutes. The 
Moderator then allowed a one time chance for any 
representative to change their vote. One representative in 
precinct 6 did change from an absent to a no vote. The 
total count was : Yes 69 No 73, 20 absent/abstain. The 
motion was defeated. Note: The actual results are on file 
in the Town Clerk's Office. 

Michael Sockol requested that a time limit for 
questions and answers be set at ten minutes. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the suggestion, 
which was defeated. 

The Town Moderator stepped aside for this article. Town 
Counsel James Harrington took over the meeting. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3 Selectman Roger Blomgren 
moved that the Town vote to amend the Chelmsford 
Home Rule Charter under Part III, Elected Town Officers 
Section 3-4 Town Moderator (b) Powers and Duties by 
deleting the third sentence of subsection (b) which reads 
as follows: 

The Moderator shall appoint a Finance Committee as 
provided by bylaw. 

and further amend the Chelmsford Home Rule Charter 
under Part II Legislative Branch/Representative Town 
Meeting Section 2-12 Procedures (d) Establishment of 
Committees by adding the following paragraph: 

"The Town Meeting Members shall appoint a Finance 
Committee as provided by bylaw. " 



248 



The action of Town Meeting under this Article shall 
be contingent upon an affirmative vote on a motion under 
Article 4 of this Warrant establishing a by-law for 
appointment of a Finance Committee. Failure of an 
affirmative vote on the motion under Article 4 shall 
render this vote a nullity. 

Selectman Blomgren spoke about the article. It was 
felt that this committee is often used as a stepping stone 
to go onto other offices. Barry Balan said that the 
Moderator does a fine job appointing these positions. 
Cheryl Warshafsky spoke in favor of the article, voters 
should be able to decide on who should appoint the 
members to the Finance Committee. Selectman Lawlor 
spoke against the article. The Finance Committee did not 
recommend the article. The majority of the Board of 
Selectman recommended the article. The Acting 
Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion defeated. 

Dennis McHugh returned to the podium as the 
Moderator. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4 Selectman Roger Blomgren 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-laws 
Article III Town Officers SECTION I FINANCE 
COMMITTEE, by deleting Section 1 in its entirety which 
reads as follows: 

SECTION 1 FINANCE COMMITTEE - The Town 
Moderator shall appoint a Finance Committee which shall 
be composed of seven (7) members; each of whom shall 
serve for a term of not more than three (3) years from the 
date of appointment. 

and insert the following SECTION 1 FINANCE 
COMMITTEE: 

SECTION 1 Finance Committee - The Town Meeting 
Members shall appoint a Finance Committee composed of 
one member for each precinct in the Town with each 
precinct voting and appointing one member to said 



249 



committee. The Town Meeting Members shall vote by 
precinct at the Annual Spring Town Meeting and the 
person receiving a majority vote of the Town Meeting 
Members present and voting within each precinct shall be 
appointed for a three year term commencing August 1st 
of the year of appointment. The Precinct Meeting shall 
require a quorum of fifty percent of the Town Meeting 
Members in each precinct to vote on the appointment . 
The Finance Committee member shall not be required to 
be a Town Meeting Member but shall reside within the 
precinct voting on the appointment. 

The validity of this amendment shall be contingent 
upon a valid amendment to the Chelmsford Home Rule 
Charter under article 3 of this Warrant. 

Selectman Blomgren moved to dismiss the article. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 Selectman Roger Blomgren 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-laws 
Article II Town Meeting Section 4 Procedures Subsection 
4.17 by deleting said subsection which reads as follows: 

4. 17 ROLL CALL BALLOT - A main motion on any 
article shall be voted upon by roll call ballot if forty (40) 
town meeting representatives so vote as the end of debate 
of that main motion and before a motion under the next 
article. 

and substituting in its place the following: 

4.17 ROLL CALL BALLOT - A main motion on any 
article shall be voted upon by roll call ballot if eighteen 
(18) town meeting representatives so vote as the end of 
debate of that main motion and before a motion under the 
next article. 

Selectman Blomgren spoke about the article. The 
Finance Committee and the Board of Selectmen were in 
favor of the article. David McLachlan felt that the Body 



250 



should wait until the Committee that was formed in the 
Spring (Voting Procedure Committee) reports it's 
findings. He was a member of the original rules 
committee and at that time it was felt that 40 
Representatives requesting a roll call vote was sufficient. 
The Town Meeting Representatives approved of this 
number also and voted it as a by-law. John Emerson 
spoke in favor of the article. He felt that it would keep 
everyone present until the end of the night. Cheryl 
Warshafsky spoke in favor citing more accountability. 
John Carson spoke against the article. The Moderator 
asked for a show of hands, motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6 Selectman Roger Blomgren 
moved that the Town vote to appoint a committee to 
consist of one Town Meeting Representative from each 
precinct to be elected by the Representatives of that 
precinct for the purpose of conducting a study and 
preparing a report of recommendations to the Town 
Meeting to review the current parliamentary procedures. 
Theses recommendations may take the form of proposed 
amendments to the General Bylaws or Charter as deemed 
appropriate. The report to be presented at the 1995 
Annual Spring Town Meeting. 

Selectman Blomgren spoke about the article. 
Michael Sockol asked what was the difference from the 
proposed committee and the committee that was voted in 
the spring, (The Voting Procedure Committee). The 
Moderator read the minutes of article 16 of the May 2, 
1994 Spring Town Meeting. A discussion took place. 
Selectman Blomgren suggested that perhaps the duties 
requested between the two articles could be combined, 
and the committee that was formed in the Spring would 
undertake it. Susan Olsen moved to amend the article by 
deleting the last sentence and add then those currently 
serving on the Rules Committee be delegated this task and 
the report be presented at the Fall Annual Town Meeting. 
Edward Marshall who was a member of the Committee 
was not in favor the amendment. Their purpose was to 
study and report on the one issue of voting procedures, 
and that is all they should do. Sandra Kilburn also a 



251 



member of the committee said that was the only item she 
was going to participate in, if anything else was to be 
done then she would resign. Barry Balan suggested that 
perhaps the Selectmen should remove the article and 
bring it back at the Spring Meeting. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands on the motion to amend, motion 
defeated. More discussion took place under the main 
motion. Dennis Ready spoke against the article. The 
Moderator asked for vote by way of a show of hands, 
motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7 Selectman Roger Blomgren 
moved that the Town vote to amend the General By-Laws 
Article IV Financial Regulation Section 4 Capital 
Planning Committee by deleting the first sentence that 
reads as follows: 

A committee to be known as the Capital Planning shall be 
established and shall be composed of the following 
committee members: The Town Accountant (non-voting 
member), the Town Treasurer, one (1) member 
designated by the School Committee, one (1) member 
designated by the Finance Committee, one (1) member 
designated by the Board of Library Trustee, and two (2) 
citizens of the Town of Chelmsford to be appointed by 
the Board of Selectmen who are neither a municipal 
employee of the Town or an elected or appointed Town 
Official except that they may be Town Meeting 
Members. 

and substitute the following in its place: 

A committee to be known as the Capital Planning shall be 
established and shall be composed of the following 
committee members: The Town Accountant (non-voting 
member), the Town Treasurer, one (1) member of the 
Board of Selectmen, one (1) member designated by the 
School Committee, one (1) member designated by the 
Finance Committee, one (1) member designated by the 
Board of Library Trustee, and two (2) citizens of the 
Town of Chelmsford to be appointed by the Board of 



252 



Selectmen who are neither a municipal employee of the 
Town or an elected or appointed Town Official except 
that they may be Town Meeting Members. 

Selectman Blomgren explained why the Board of 
Selectmen felt that a member of their Board should be on 
the committee. A discussion took place. The Finance 
Committee was against the article. The Board of 
Selectmen were in favor. The Moderator asked for a vote 
by way of a show of hands, motion defeated. 

George Ripsom moved for re-consideration of Article 
2. The Finance Committee did not recommended the 
motion for reconsideration. The majority of the Board of 
Selectmen were not in favor of the motion. Cheryl 
Warshafsky spoke in favor of the motion. Michael 
Sockol moved the question to stop debate. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands on the motion to 
stop debate, motion carried. The Moderator asked for a 
show of hands on the motion to reconsider, motion 
defeated. 

At this time seeing that there was no further business, 
Michael Sockol moved to adjourn the Special Town 
Meeting at 10:25 PM in order to reconvene the 
Adjourned Annual Town Meeting. The Moderator asked 
for a show of hands, motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12 James Good moved that the 
town vote to amend the existing Town of Chelmsford 
Zoning Map by removing the following described 
properties on the southerly side of Mill road (also known 
as Russell Mill Road) from Public District (P) and placing 
said properties in a Residential B District (RB) 

PARCEL I 

The property described in a deed to Merrimack 
Education Center, Inc., dated January 3, 1978 and 
recorded with the Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds in Book 2284, Page 545. Said property contains 



253 



1.73 acres more or less. This property is also identified 
as 101 Mill Road and shown as Map 142, Lot 66 on the 
records of the Town of Chelmsford Board of Assessors. 

PARCEL II 

The easterly portion of the property described in a 
deed to Lloyd C. Green, Jr., dated May 19, 1954 and 
recorded with the Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds in Book 1255, Page 573. This property is also 
identified as a portion of 99 Mill Road and shown as the 
easterly portion of Map 141, Lot 1 on the records of the 
Town of Chelmsford Board of Assessors. 

The Moderator asked for the Finance Committee's 
recommendation. The Finance Committee supported the 
article, D wight Hay ward explained that this was 
clarification of a zoning district line that had been 
inadvertently rezoned during the 1986 master plan update. 
The Board of Selectmen recommended the article. 

James Good, Chairman of the Planning Board came 
forth and read the Board's recommendation: 

The Planning Board held a public hearing on October 
12, 1994 on the above mentioned article after advertising 
a legal notice in the Chelmsford Independent on 
September 22nd and 29th, 1994 a minimum of 14 days 
before the hearing. A copy of the ad was sent to all 
abutting towns and the appropriated agencies, as required 
in the Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 40A, Section 
5. At that meeting, the proponents, residents and the 
Planning Board discussed the merits of this zoning by-law 
change. It is the opinion of the Planning Board that the 
area on Mill Road that was described in the legal ad is 
currently incorrectly zoned. Therefore, in keeping 
consistent with the general intent of the Zoning By- laws 
for continuity in the development of the community, the 
Planning Board voted (5-0) to recommend an amendment 



254 



to the Town of Chelmsford Zoning Map to remove the 
property on 99 Mill Road and 101 Mill Road (P) Public 
and place all of said property in a (RB) Residential (B) 
District. 

The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a show of 
hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to establish a Special 
Revenue Fund to set aside Special Education 
reimbursements form the medicaid system. 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch explained the article. 
The School Committee in the Spring session gave a 
presentation regarding their budget operation. Some of 
the money they anticipated to receive was to come from 
the Federal Government through the medicaid program. 
This was the reimbursement of the costs associated with 
special education. The money has not yet arrived, but 
once it does it needs to be segregated, which is the 
purpose of this article, to set up a Special Revenue 
Account Fund. The Finance Committee was in favor of 
the article. The Board of Selectmen are in favor of the 
article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved to transfer a certain sum of money from 
Medicaid Special Education Reimbursements, Special 
Revenue, to amend the Fiscal Year 1995 Budget 
contained within the 1994 Annual Town Meeting 26, 
Line Item, 6, Chelmsford School Department. 

Bernard Lynch moved to dismiss this article. He had 
explained in the previous article that because the funding 
has yet to arrive from the Federal Government there is no 
money to transfer at this time. The Finance Committee 
and the Board of Selectmen were in favor of dismissing 
the article. The Moderator asked for a vote by way of a 
show of hands, motion carried, unanimously. 



255 



UNDER ARTICLE 15 Town Manager Lynch 
explained the purpose of the article. He said that as part 
of the School Department's Comprehensive Budget Plan 
presented at the past spring meeting, a certain sum of 
money was to be saved and carried over to FY 1995. 
Due to a the requirement of State law this is no longer an 
option. It has been generated to free cash. $112,000.00 
needs to be transferred in order for the School 
Department to maintain their budget and level of 
operation as presented in the spring. John Carson asked 
Dr Moser, Superintendent of Schools to update the body 
on what has happened to the schools since the School 
Committee didn't receive their requested funding from 
the Town. Dr Moser explained that 112 additional 
students were added to the roles. The re-organization 
process that was required due to lack of funding went 
well. However, the results are larger classrooms in the 
Kindergarten through fourth grade classrooms. 86 more 
students were added in these areas. If the Town was to 
budget him the additional $100,000.00, which was 
requested in the spring, then the pressing need for 
supporting the increase in class size could be addressed. 
Eight more class room aides could be added, additional 
guidance counselors in the high school area, and 
instrumental music could continue. This would be a one 
time expenditure. John Carson asked Bernard Lynch 
where this additional money could come from. The Town 
Manager explained that the money from free cash, in 
which $190,000 was money being returned from the Solid 
Waste Program due to funding from the override question 
in 1992 could be dispersed differently within the 
remaining articles, if so voted. Example, if the Body 
wanted to take the amount from article 16 and apply it 
towards this article that would be an avenue. Discussion 
took place. The Finance Committee supported the 
article. The Board of Selectmen supported the article. 
John Carson moved to amend the figure to read 
$200,000.00 and explained that the money would come 
from article 16. More discussion took place. A number 
of Representatives spoke in favor of the increase. The 
Finance Committee did not recommend the amended 
figure. The Board of Selectmen were against the 



256 



increase. John Coppinger asked what the anticipated tax 
increase would be on a average $150,000.00 home when 
the tax rate was set for this year. The Town Manager 
explained that the figures are still being worked on but an 
anticipated increase could be between $150.00 to 
$180.00. Cheryl Warshafsky asked what was the amount 
that the average household would receive back if the 
$190,000.00 was used to reduce the tax rate. The Town 
Manager explained that based on an $160,000.00 
assessment that each household would receive $15.00 or 
$20.00 per household if the free cash amount stayed at 
$250,000.00. Cheryl Warshafsky felt that this would be 
an good investment for the Town and supported the 
amendment to increase the amount given to the School 
Budget. Michael Sockol spoke in favor citing that now 
was the time to spend the money, it wasn't feasible last 
April when it wasn't available. Barry Balan spoke 
against the increase. He felt that the School Department 
should be given the $112,000.00 because that was what 
they were budgeted for, but they should be live within 
their budget like all the other departments do. George 
Merrill spoke against the motion to amend. More 
discussion took place. Henrick Johnson moved the 
question to stop debate. The Moderator asked for a show 
of hands, motion carried, unanimously. He then asked 
for a show of hands on the motion to amend the figure to 
read $200,000.00. Motion carried. The Moderator then 
asked for a show of hands on the main motion as 
amended, motion carried. The article reads as follows: 

Town Manager Bernard Lynch moved that the town 
vote to transfer the sum of $200,000.00 from Line Item 
28 Undistributed Expenses to Line Item 6 Chelmsford 
School Department. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16 Town Manger Bernard Lynch 
moved that the Town vote to reduce the sum raised and 
appropriated under Article 26 of the Annual Spring Town 
Meeting in May 1994 by $88,000 and amend the 1995 
Budget by decreasing Line Item 28 Undistributed 
Expenses by said sum. 



257 



The Town Manager moved to dismiss this article. The 
Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion carried, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $35,512.00 with which to meet bills from 
previous years. 

The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved that the town vote to transfer and 
appropriate from Free Cash the sum of $826,600.00 to 
the Stabilization Fund. 

The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved that the town vote to instruct the Board of 
Assessors to issue the sum of $190,000.00 from Free 
Cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax rate. 

The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 20 Town Manager Bernard 
Lynch moved that the Town vote to instruct the Board of 
Assessors to issue the sum of $578,918.00 from Free 
Cash in the Treasury to balance the FY 95 budget. 

The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. 

The Town Manager announced that the quarterly 
financial reports required by Town Meeting vote, were 
available tonight at the back of the hall, and will also be 
at the Town Office Building. 



258 



The Moderator asked that the Representatives cleanup 
their tables after the meeting adjourns. 

Seeing that there was no further business at hand, 
Michael McCall moved to adjourn the Town Meeting. 
The Moderator asked for a show of hands, motion 
carried, unanimously. The meeting adjourned at 11:10 
PM. 



Dennis E. McHugh, Mary E. St.Hilaire, 
Moderator Town Clerk 



259 



TOWN WARRANT FOR 

STATE ELECTION 

NOVEMBER 8, 1994 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable of the Town of Chelmsford: 

Greeting: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby 
required to notify and warn the Inhabitants of said Town 
who are qualified to vote in State Elections to vote at: 

Precinct 1: 

Town Office Gymnasium, 50 Billerica Road 

Precinct I.- 
Harrington School Gymnasium, 120 Richardson 
Road 

Precinct 3: 

Harrington School Gymnasium, 120 Richardson 
Road 

Precinct 4: 

Westlands School Cafeteria, 170 Dalton Road 

Precinct 5: 

Byam School Cafeteria, 25 Maple Road 

Precinct 6: 

Westlands School Cafeteria, 170 Dalton Road 

Precinct 7: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium, 
250 North Road 

Precinct 8: 

McCarthy Middle School, Small Gymnasium, 
250 North Road 



260 



Precinct 9: 

Town Offices Gymnasium, 50 Billerica Road 

On Tuesday, the eight day of November, 1994 from 7:00 
a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purpose. 

1) To cast their votes in the State Election for the 
candidates of political parties for the following offices: 

U.S. SENATOR 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
GOVERNOR 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
LT. GOVERNOR 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
SECRETARY 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
TREASURER 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
AUDITOR 

FOR THE COMMONWEALTH 
REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 

Fifth Congressional District 
COUNCILLOR 

Third Councillor District 
SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT 

Fifth Middlesex Senatorial District 
REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 

16th Middlesex Representative District 
DISTRICT ATTORNEY 

Northern District 
CLERK OF COURTS 

Middlesex County 
REGISTER OF DEEDS 

Middlesex Northern District 
COUNTY COMMISSIONER 

Middlesex County 



261 



2) To Vote on the following Questions: 

#1 - Regulating Spending on Ballot Question Campaigns 

#2 - Seat Belt Law 

#3 - Changing the Law Regarding Student Fees 

#4 - Term Limits 

#5 - Opening of Retail Stores on Sunday Mornings 
and Certain Holidays 

#6 - Graduated Income Tax 

#7 - Personal Income Tax Changes 

#8 - State Highway Fund Changes 

#9 - Prohibiting Rent Control 

For complete warrant information see original 
documents on file in the Town Clerk's Office. 



262 



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OFFICE OF THE TOWN MANAGER 

TOWN OFFICES 

SO BILLERICA ROAD 

CHELMSFORD, MA 01824-3193 

CITIZENS ACTIVITY RECORD 
"GOOD GOVERNMENT STARTS WITH YOU" 

If you are interested in serving on an appointed town committee, please till out ibis form and mail to: Office of the Town 
Manager. Town Offices. SO BUlenca Road. Chelmsford. MA 01824-3193. The filling out of this form in no way assures 
appointment. All committee vacancies will be filled by citizens deemed most qualified to serve in a particular capacity. 



HOME PHONE: 1 ) BUSINESS PHONE: (_ 

A0ORESS: 



AMOUNT OF TIME AVAILABLE: 



INTEREST IN WHAT TOWN COMMITTEE: 



PRESENT BUSINESS AFFILIATION AND WORK: 



BUSINESS EXPERIENCE: 



EDUCATION OR SPECIAL TRAINING: 



DATE APPOINTED TOWN OFFICES HELD TERM EXPIRED 



REMARKS: 



FORM AVAILABLE AT TOWN MANAGER'S OFFICE 



269 



INDEX 

Page 

Application for Appointment to 

Town Committees 269 

Appointed Town Officials 7 

Balance Sheet 1 1 

Board of Appeals 115 

Board of Health 24 

Board of Registrars 23 

Board of Selectmen 13 

Celebrations Committee 116 

Cemetery Commission 37 

Central Mass. Mosquito Control District 28 

C ommis sion on Disabilities 117 

Community Service Council 119 

Conservation Commission 120 

Council on Aging 122 

Cultural Council 124 
Department of Public Works 

- Engineering Division 30 

- Highway Division 31 

- Parks Division 33 

- Public Buildings Division 34 

- Sewer Division 35 
Dog Officer 60 
Elected Officials 5 
Emergency Management 126 
Finance Committee 127 
Finance Department 

- Accounting 40 

- Assessors 41 

- Data Processing 42 

- Treasurer 43 
Fire Department 44 
General Information 1 
Historical District Commission 129 
Holiday Decorating Committee 130 
Housing Authority 132 
Inspections Department 61 
Nashoba Valley Technical High School 107 
Personnel Board 135 
Planning Board 136 
Police Department 48 
Police Auxiliary 58 
Public Libraries 62 
Recreation Commission 140 
Sewer Commission 143 



INDEX 

Page 

School Committee 68 

- Principal-High School 72 

- Principal-McCarthy Middle School 74 

- Student/Community Services 76 

- Guidance Department 77 

- Data Processing 81 

- English Department - 6-8 83 

- English Department - 9-12 84 

- Fine Arts Department 86 

- Foreign Languages Department - 7-12 87 

- Mathematics Department - K-8 88 

- Mathematics Department - 9-12 90 

- Reading Department - K-12 91 

- Science Department - 5-8 94 

- Science Department 96 

- Social Studies Department - 5-8 98 

- Social Studies Department - 9-12 99 

- Health & Physical Education 100 

- Athletics 102 

- Practical Arts - 9-12 103 

- Special Education 105 
Solid Waste Advisory Committee 147 
Town Clerk 21 
Town Meetings and Elections 

- Warrant for Annual Town Election - April 5, 1994 155 

- Results of Annual Town Election - April 5, 1994 158 

- Annual Town Meeting Minutes - April 25, 1994 162 

- Warrant for Special Town Election - April 28 , 1 994 1 70 

- Special Town Meeting Minutes - April 28, 1994 171 

- Adjourned Special Town Meeting Minutes - May 2, 1994 190 

- Adjourned Town Meeting Minutes - May 5, 1994 201 

- Adjourned Town Meeting Minutes - May 9, 1994 212 

- Warrant for State Primary Election - September 20, 1994 219 

- Results of State Primary Election - September 20, 1994 221 

- Warrant for Fall Annual Town Meeting - October 17, 1994 229 

- Annual Town Meeting Minutes - October 17, 1994 230 

- Warrant for Special Town Meeting - October 24, 1994 243 

- Adjourned Annual Town Mtg Minutes - October 24, 1994 244 

- Special Town Meeting Minutes - October 24, 1994 244 

- Warrant for State Election - November 8, 1994 260 

- Results of State Election - November 8, 1994 263 
Town Directory 2 
Town Manager 17 
Town Meeting Representative Members 8 
Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 152 
Veterans' Services 149 



CHELMSFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1480 0076 4593 7 



r~ 



For Reference 

Not to be taken 
from this library 



v. 



"Disabled individuals requiring auxiliary aides to fully 
benefit from the Town of Chelmsford's programs should 
contact the Personnel Coordinator at 250-5201. It is 
necessary to give the request at least one week in 
advance. "